Text: William Doyle Hull II, “Part V, Chapter II,” A Canon of the Critical Works of Edgar Allan Poe (1941) , pp. 626-693


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


[page 626:]

[[Chapter II: Commentary on the Critical Writings in the Broadway Journal]]
 
Volume II: July 12, 1845, through January 3, 1846

Poe now is editor-in-chief of the Broadway Journal. Watson, as before, has charge of the musical department. There is nothing to suggest that Poe had an assistant of any sort in the office except Crane, the office boy who ran errands and wrapped and addressed the magazines. None of the reviews are long, and the number of very short notices — mere announcements of one or two lines — is considerably larger even than in the first volume. On the basis of the set-up in the office, a method for dealing with these brief notices may be adopted with some safety. Except in the presence of contradictory evidence, all of the notices in this section of the journal may be assumed to be Poe’s in varying degrees of definiteness. There is the possibility, though slight I think, that Watson or even some outside friend was called on for help occasionally when Poe was swamped with work, or when he was ill or absent from the office. Should such a case exist, however, it is unlikely that Poe should have asked for one or more of these short notices which could be tossed off almost perfunctorily at top speed with only a hasty glance at the book for a basis. Indeed, a great many of these notices merely call attention to the title, printed in full, as an indication of the nature of the book. This method, then, will be adopted in treating these brief notices: the mere listing of those that present in themselves no suggestive evidence will automatically place them in the canon as probably Poe’s; the quoting from those that have in themselves evidence which, though not finally conclusive, corroborates that of the office set-up will [page 627:] automatically place them in the canon as Poe’s, though not with an asterisk. Only the longer notices and those short ones containing evidence of a more definite sort will need comment.

JULY 12, 1845.

* 124. THE COMING OF THE MAMMOTH — THE FUNERAL OF TIME, AND OTHER POEMS. BY HENRY B. HIRST.

Griswold printed in his edition of the “Literati” a previously unpublished Poe criticism of Hirst. This article uses material from the Journal review: H, XIII, 209, 11.8-22, is a condensation with many verbal parallels of H, XII, 1.26, 106, to 1.14, 167.

In the Journal review one finds Poe’s often stated feeling about the use of allegory:

‘The Burial of Eros’ is a very effective allegorical poem — but all allegories are oontemptible — at least the only trio which are not contemptible (The Pilgrim’s Progress and the Fairy queen) are admired in despite of themselves (as allegories) and in the direct ratio of the possibility of keeping the allegorical meaning out of sight (BJ, II, 9) .

In the Godey’s review of Hawthorne Poe wrote of Pilgrim’s Progress:

. . . the pleasure derivable from it, in any sense, will be found to be in the direct ratio of the reader’s capacity to smother its true purpose, in the direct ratio of his ability to keep the allegory out of sight . . . (GLB, XXXV, 254; H, XIII, 149) .

Mabbott has a pertinent comment on a copy of Hirst’s poems with annotations believed to be in Poe’s hand:

I believe most, probably all, of the markings in the volume come from Poe’s pencil — and that he used the volume in preparing his review for ‘Broadway Journal’ of July 12, 1845, in which he quotes a great many of the passages marked.(1)

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with some marginal notes by Ingram. [page 628:]

125. TALES. BY EDGAR A. POE.

The notice lists the contents, remarking that these twelve tales are selected from seventy of similar length.

No particular arrangement has been made in the selection. The stories published in the volumes before us, are neither better nor worse in general, than the remainder of the seventy. In the composition of the whole series, variety of subject and manner, especially diversity of invention, were the objects held in view. Of course the objects are lost sight of, and must necessarily be sacrificed in any mere selection of twelve tales from seventy (BJ, I, 10) .

Poe wrote Anthon in June, 1844, in respect to the tales: “Variety has been one of my chief aims“.(1) The descriptive rather than the critical approach is in itself strong evidence. I have no doubt that Poe is the author.

There follow six very brief notices, perfunctory announcements; all of them probably Poe’s.

(?) 126. A SYSTEM OF LATIN VERSIFICATION. BY CHARLES ANTHON.

(?) 127. THE TRIALS OF MARGARET LINDSAY. BY JOHN WILSON.

(?) 128. THE FORRESTERS. BY PROFESSOR WILSON.

(?) 129. THE MODERN BRITISH ESSAYISTS.

(?) 130. REPUBLICATION OF THE LONDON, EDINBURGH, FOREIGN AND WESTMINSTER QUARTERLY REVIEWS. NO. 176.

(?) 131. THE LONDON LANCET FOR JULY.

* 132. THE MAGAZINES.

. . . a discriminative review of Mr. Griswold’s ‘Poets and Poetry of England’ by Mr. Whipple, undoubtedly one of our finest critics (BJ, II, 10) .

In “About Critics and Criticism” Poe wrote:

Our most analytic, if not altogether our best critic, (Mr. Whipple, perhaps, excepted,) is Mr. William A. Jones . . . (GM, XXXVI, ???; H, XIII, 193) . [page 629:]

One finds, again, in the Journal article: “We are truly delighted to find him so keenly appreciatory of the magnificent genius of Tennyson” (BJ, II, 10) . Poe’s early recognition and appreciation of Tennyson is well known. In “About Critics and Criticism” he wrote: “I have read nothing finer in its way than his (Whipple’s) eulogy on Tennyson” (GM, XXXVI, ???; H, XIII, 193) . This eulogy is in the Graham’s review of Griswold, for which here, in the Journal article, Poe praises Whipple. William Wallace, the Kentucky poet whom Poe later pushed skyward, is here given a fat puff.

The last magazine to “be noticed in this column is the Knickerbocker: here is evidence enough that Briggs has departed. All the notices of this periodical in volume 1 are his. Clarke was a friend of his. Clarke was not a friend of Poe’s:

. . . neither man nor devil can dissuade its editor from a monthly farrago of types so small as to be nearly invisible, and so stupid as to make us wish it were quite so . . . In three lines devoted to the ‘Broadway Journal’ intended to be complimentary, we believe, although we sincerely hope not, he makes use of what he supposes to be a French proverb, and writes it chacun a son gout, taking great pains to place a grave accent on the verb, mistaking it for the preposition, and complimenting the hard c with a cedilla. ‘Within the compass of the same three lines, he talks about a nil admirari critic . . . We certainly do not admire Mr. Clarke — nor his wig — but the true English of the Latin phrase is ‘to wonder at nothing‘, and we plead guilty to having wondered at nothing since we have found the Knickerbocker sinking day by day in the public opinion in despite of the brilliant abilities and thoroughly liberal education of Mr. Lewis Gaylord Clarke (BJ, II, 11) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

JULY 19, 1845.

* 133. ALFRED TENNYSON.

We do not know when we have seen in any American or British Journal an article we have so much admired, or one with whose opinions we have so [page 630:] thoroughly accorded, as with a late review, by Mr. Whipple, of Mr. Griswold’s ‘Poets and Poetry of the Nineteenth Century’ . . . The injustice done in America to the magnificent genius of Tennyson. is one of the worst sins for which the country has to answer (BJ, II, 26) .

The rest of the article is quoted from Whipple. The reference back to the “Magazines” of the preceding week and the verbal parallel give the notice to Poe.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with marginal lining.

* 134. THE AGE OF ELIZABETH. BY WILLIAM HAZLITT.

Here Poe says of Hazlitt:

. . . in almost every point, except the vivida vis of glowing fancy, we look upon him as the inferior of Macaulay — a man who, if he has not written the best criticisms ever penned, has at least shown the capacity to write them; but we would rank him next to Macaulay, and very far before Leigh Hunt, who was a dexterous but unanalytical, and somewhat confused prosodist . . . Upon the whole he (Hazlitt) is singularly vivid, forceful, acute, discriminative, and suggestive . . . His judgment is never for one minute to be depended upon in any connected or consecutive series of opinions. He is often profound — but his profundity is invariably detailed or particular (BJ, II, 28) .

A month later, reviewing Hazlitt’s Characters of Shakspeare, he wrote:

He is emphatically a critic, brilliant, epigrammatic, startling, paradoxical, and suggestive, rather than accurate, luminous, or profound . . . At all points, except perhaps, in fancy, he is superior to Leigh Hunt, whom nevertheless he remarkably resembles. It is folly to compare him with Macaulay, for there is scarcely a single point of approximation, and Macaulay is by much the greater man. The author of ‘The Lays of Ancient Rome’ has an intellect so well balanced and so thoroughly proportioned, as to appear, in the eyes of the multitude, much smaller than it really is. He needs a few foibles to purchase him eclat. No::, take away the innumerable follies of Hunt and Hazlitt, and we should have the anomaly of findin them more diminutive than we fancy them while the foibles remain. Nevertheless, they are men of genius still (BJ, II, 89) . [page 631:]

It is clear that both notices are from the same hand — Poe’s. In the first he uses a phrase which he often used: les moutons des Panurge. The diction and rhythm is Poe’s:

Works were required of a piquancy to render them at once popular (for . . . the immediate and extensive sale of the Library was indispensable) and at the same time, of a gravity which would enable them to make their way as volumes not only sufficiently wall gotten up, but of a sufficiently standard character to warrant their preservation in our book-cases (BJ, II, 28) .

A paragraph from the second gives strong corroboration:

In all commentary upon Shakspeare, there has been a radical error, never yet mentioned. It is the error of attempting to expand his characters — to account for their actions -to reconcile their inconsistencies — not as if they were the coinage of a human brain, but as if they had been actual existences upon earth. We talk of Hamlet the man, instead of Hamlet the dramatis persona — of Hamlet the God, in place of Hamlet -tha a spears created. If Hamlet had really lived, and if the tragedy were an accurate record of his deeds, from this record (with some trouble) we might, it is true, reconcile his inconsistencies and settle to our satisfaction his true character, But the task becomes the purest absurdity when we deal only with a phantom. It is not (then) the inconsistencies of the acting man which we have as a subject of discussion — (although we proceed as if it were, and thus inevitably err,) but the whims and vacillations — the conflicting energies and indolences of the poet. It seems to us little less than a miracle, that this obvious point should have been overlooked (BJ, II, 89) .

The August 16 review, “Characters“, is signed “P” in the Whitman copy; both of these may be given Poe definitely.

135. ORTHCPHONY. BY JAMES E. MURDOCH.

There are some passages, (relating chiefly to metre) , with which we totally disagree, and of which we may take an opportunity: of speaking more fully hereafter — but in general the book appears to us remarkably accurate and valuable (BJ, II, 28) .

156. A DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. BY ALEXANDER REID. [page 632:]

Thirdly, there is a vocabulary of the roots of English words, by which the accurate purport of them is discoverable — a very important improvement . . . As a text book for schools the volume cannot fail of being useful (BJ, II, 28) .

(?) 137. A HISTORY OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCHES IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK. BY HENRY M. ONDERDONK.

138. THE DRAMA.

“Marginalia“, Graham’s [[???]] reproduces exactly, excepting for three or four stylistic alterations, a passage here: H, XVI, 1.24, 109, to 1.24, 110, from H, XII, 1.11, 186, to 1.9, 187. The “Literati” article on Mrs. Howatt, Godoy’s, June, 1846, borrows also from here: H, XV, 31.11.25-30, exact from H, XII, 118, 11.6-11; XV, 1.33, 31, to 1.5, 32, with slight stylistic changes from XII, 1.33, 187, to 1.5, 188; XV, 32, 11.6-20, from XII, 187, 11.14-28, with the last sentence in the Journal transferred to a higher position, reworded with two words omitted and two added. Poe writes here: “The writer of this article is himself the son of an actress” (BJ, II, 29; H, XII, 186) .

Signed “P‘” in the Whitman copy.

JULY 26, 1845.

* 139. A CHAUNT OF LIFE, AND OTHER POEMS. BY REV. RALPH HOYT. PART II.

In the “Literati” article on Hoyt one finds:

Of the previous issue, one entitled ‘Old’ had so many peculiar excellences that I copied the whole of it, although quite long, in the “Broadway Journal’ (GLB, XXXV, 268; H, XV, 37) .

This review copies the whole poem. The “Literati” article is a rewriting of the Journal review, save for the last paragraph, which is a personal description. The section beginning with the sentence I have quoted is, except for stylistic variations exact from the [page 633:] earlier review: H, XV, 1.8, 37, to 1.12, 38, from H, XII, 195, 11.4-19.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

There follow three brief notices which I quote entire.

140. THE MYSTERIES OF BERLIN. PART VII.

This is a very weak and absurd imitation, or rather exaggeration of all the most reprehensible features of ‘The Mysteries of Paris’ (BJ, II, 40-1) .

141. THIS ROMAN PONTIFF, OR A SKETCH OF THE LIVES OF THE SUMREME HEADS OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.

A pamphlet of great interest. Its title so rally explains its design that we need say little about it. The work is well translated from the French (BJ, II, 41) .

142. TWO LETTERS ON SLAVERY. BY J. H. HAMMOND.

A nervously written pamphlet, the design of which is to show that slavery is an inevitable condition of human society (BJ, II, 41) .

143. THE DRAMA.

This column also Poe plundered for his “Literati” article on Mrs. Mowatt: H, XV, 1.26, 30, to 1.20, 31, exact from H, XII; 191, 11.2-30, with the exception of two or three stylistic changes and the insertion of one line.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

AUGUST 2, 1845.

144. THE LOST PLEIAD: AND OTHER ‘OEW. BY T. H. CHIVERS.

Dr. Chivers wrote Poe about this review of his poems on September 9, 1845:

My poems have been spoken of in the very highest terms in this state, by all who have seen them. Several papers have republished your notice, with also remarks an their merits, of the most flattering nature, at the same time that you were spoken of in the highest terms.(1) [page 634:]

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

TALES FROM THE GERMAN OF HEINRICH ZSCHOKKE. BY PARKE GODWIN.

The review begins:

The soil of the country, as far as its literature , is concerned, is undergoing a remarkable culture. Every variety of implement is at work upon it; ploughing, hoeing, harrowing, besprinkling, and beshowering it, after the most wonderful fashion. We hope the crop may be answerable to these anxious preliminaries; among which, as one of the most hopeful, is to be counted Herr Zachokke — whom we have in various tales of humor, sentiment and wisdom, in the collection before us (BJ, II, 56) .

This loose demi-rhapsody is not Poe’s. Nor is the opinion of Zsehokke his. In the Journal for May 24 And June 14 he noticed Zachokke: in both he stressed, the popularity of the men, and in the notice of Veronica added:

. . . popular in America, to an extent which neither his intrinsic merit nor his foreign reputation would appear to justify (BJ, I, 379) .

The present reviewer writes that the opening piece furnishes

a key-note to the author and his method of composition. Several of the tales are intended to exhibit the conventions, false usages, defeats, and mal-practices of society under the direct light of nature . . . The other tales are of various character and merit; — all of a popular cast, and with a sprinkling of the better salt of human nature, to savor the reader’s humanity (BJ, II, 56) .

This is the complete extent of the criticism; there is no demonstration of “the method of composition“. The rest of the rather long review is given over to retelling certain tales. I feel sure that this is not Poe’s. Whose it may be I cannot guess. It could not be strange for Poe, with his many duties, to accept or even ask for a review to fill space. [page 635:]

* 145. THE FORTUNE HUNTER. BY MRS. ANNA CORA MOWAT T.

We have received this novel at too late a period to do more then mention it this week, and make an extract from its pages. Hereafter we shall do it that full justice which is demanded by the celebrity and varied talent of its fair author (BJ, II, 56; H, XII, 207) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

* 146. PROSE AND VERSE. BY THOMAS HOOD. PART I.

In the Journal for August 9 Poe has a review of Hood which begins:

Of this number of the Library(1) we said a few words last week — but Hood was far too remarkable a man to be passed over in so cursory a manner (BJ, II, 71; H, XII, 213) .

The later review is Poe’s beyond question; so, then, is this.

(?) 147. PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE WORLD. BY JOHN FROST.

148. THE GODOLPHIN ARABIAN. BY EUGENE SUE.

It is in Sue’s best manner — full of pathos and in all respects excellent, without being intense (BJ, II, 157) .

149. PRAISE AND PRINCIPLE.

The story is really admirable — equal to Sandford and Norton — and somewhat resembling it in general tone and manner (BJ, II, 57) .

150. THE WANDERING JEW. BY EUGENE SUE. NO. XV.

Here is a vast amount of reading matter furnished for three cents. The story proceeds with interest (BJ, II, 57) .

(?) 151. MRS. CAUDLE’S CURTAIN LECTURES.

(?) 152. BLACKWOOD’S EDINBURGH MAGAZINE. NO. CCCLVII. [page 636:]

(?) 153. THE BREACH OF PROMISE.

(?) 154. LIFE IN DALECRALIS. BY FREDERIKA BREMER.

It is peculiarly wild sand entertaining (BJ, II, 57) .

(?) 155. THE TREASURY OF HISTORY. NO. VII.

* 156. THE DRAMA.

In taking leave of Mrs. Mowatt for the present, we have only again to record our opinion that . . . (BJ, II, 60; H, XII, 211) .

And the opinion recorded is a summary in paraphrase of sections of the two preceding Drama columns which were later reproduced in “Literati” and Marginalia“.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

* 157. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Largely composed of scissor — work, this column has little of critical import save an announcement that Judge Conrad, whom Poe reviewed in Graham’s and in the Evening Mirror, is writing another drama: “‘Aylmere’ was well received, and has much merit” (BJ, II, 61) ; and a paragraph on Thomas:

As a biographical sketcher Mr. Thomas is unsurpassed; and he has kindly promised us a succession of such papers as the one now published (BJ, II, 62) .

On September 29, 1845, Thomas wrote Poe:

I see you have published two of my sketches (Randolph-Wirt) — I observed them kindly noticed . . .(1)

This comment in the “Miscellany” is the only reference in Volume II of the Journal, or in Volume I, for that matter, for Thomas. The evidence is conclusive. [page 637:]

AUGUST 9, 1845.

* 158. PROSE AND VERSE. BY THOMAS HOOD. PART I.

That we may be more clearly understood on this head, we will venture to quote a few passages of definition which were used by ourselves on a former occasion — while commention on the prose style of Mr. Willis . . . (BJ, II, 71; H, XII, 216) .

Poe then quotes verbatim from the January 18 Broadway Journal article, H, XII, 1.3, 37, to 1.15, 40. Harrison does not reprint the passage. A large section of it Poe used later in the “Literati” sketch of Willis.

“Marginalia“, Messenger, September, 1849, reproduces part of this review: H, XVI, 177, 11.3-27, exact with a few stylistic changes from H, XII, 21d, 11.4-27; XVI, 1.28, 177, to 1.26, 178, exact with a few stylistic alterations from XIV, 1.15, 215, to 1.14, 216. The last paragraph in “marginalia” is a welding of XII, 216, 11.18-21, and 217, 11.304 and 8-13.

Signed “P” in the ‘Whitman copy.

159. ETTORE FIER MOSCA. BY MASSINO D‘AZEGLIO.

Poe wrote in “Editorial Miscellany” for August 16:

In our notice last week, of ‘The Medics series of Italian Prose(2) we spoke inadvertently, thus: — ‘The present enterprise extends, we believe, no farther than to the Italian Romance‘. Here we were mistaken. The design is far more comprehensive. It will include many historical and other works of value (BJ, II, 94) .

In the “Miscellany” for August 23 Poe has:

A late number of ‘The New York Mirror’ contains a very fulsome ‘Resume’ (sic) of “The Challenge of Barletta.(3) This ‘Resume’ (what is a resume?) is written much in the manner of Mr. Lester,(4) whom it [page 638:] compliments with great warmth, and no doubt (in Mr. Lester’s opinion) with great justice. We are quite astonished, however, to find so respectable a journal as ‘The Mirror’ degrading itself to the admission of obvious puffs from the pens of ‘Correspondents‘. The article in question has the following passages . . . We are the ‘certain critic’ here alluded to. The phrase ‘autorial comment’ (sic) as quoted by Mr. Lester’s friend or self; is a falsehood — one of his 50,000. We defy him to show us in our critique anything resembling what he unblushingly attributes to us. The ‘muddy idea’ is then only his own — and we never knew hi-i to have one that was not. But will he be so good as to translate for the readers of ‘The Mirror’ the phrase n‘est pas — and at the same time inform us who is the Mr. McCauley to whom he attributes so much rigmarole about historical romance?

As regards the impossibility of not reading Mr. Lester’s stupid book through, the only impossibility in our case, and in all that we have heard of, has been to refrain from throwing the thing out of the window after being sickened to death by the Preface (BJ, II, 109) .

In the review Poe accuses the novel of being

defective in having little of what we understand by the ‘autorial comment’ — that which adds so deed a charm to the novels of Scott, of Bulwer, or of D‘Israeli — more especially to the works of Godwin and Brockden Brown . . . The narrative proceeds, as if to narrate were the author’s sole business. The interest of mere incident, is all (BJ, II, 74-5) .

In the Graham’s reviews of Night and Morning and Joseph Rushbrook, Poe talked at length about “autorial comment” and novels whose life was mere incident.(1)

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

160. A CYCLOPAEDIA OF SEVERAL THOUSAND PRACTICAL RECEIPTS, etc. BY ARNOLD JAMES COWLEY.

We give in full the comprehensive title of this work, as the best mode of explaining its design (BJ, II, 75) .

(?) 161. THE PARTING SPIRIT’S ADDRESS TO HIS MOTHER. BY WILLIAM EDWARD WYATT. [page 639:]

(?) 162. LETTERS FROM ITALY. BY J. T. HEADLEY.

This is a work to be read. Of books generally it is said, that one is fine, another artistical, another elegant, another vigorous: but the peculiar property of this book of Mr. Headley’s is, that it is written to be read. He carries you along just as a man of animated gestures, quick eye, and earnest utterance takes you with him in the recital of a story or a sketch of character. Mr. Headley is an observer of great quickness; he sees at once and seizes all that suits his purpose . . . These are perhaps more literally First Impressions of Travel than any ever published . . . by relying merely on his own honest spontaneous impressions, he makes old things look new, and by steaming along, in true American style, through and over guide-books, itineraries, Eustace, Forsyth and company, he attains a merit analogous to that of high invention in imaginative writing. And although this spirit carries him at times too far, it gives constant freshness to his record; merging faults of style and expression in the hurry of description and the eagerness with which he constantly presents the results of his observations to the reader . . . We are now and then taken aback, we confess, by an assertion of so broad and comprehensive a nature as to sweep the field of criticism and statement from end to end . . . There are not a few passages tersely rendered, and, when he chooses, no one can be more pointed and descriptive in epithet than the author of these letters (BJ, II, 75) .

Poe’s opinion of Headley expressed several years later is in a different tone:

Mr. Headley belongs to that numerous class of authors, who must be read to be understood, and who, for that reason, very seldom are as thoroughly comprehended as they should be . . . (he) is the Autocrat of all the Quacks. In saying this, we beg not to be misunderstood. We mean no disparagement to Mr. Headley. We admire that gentleman himself (SLM, XVI, 609-70; H, XIII, 203, 208) .

In the Journal for December 27, however, Poe expressed in a review of Headley’s The Alps and the Rhine much the point of view of the August 5 notice:

This is one of the most entertaining books yet issued in the American series. The vivacity and brilliant fancy of Headley throw a charm over all of his descriptions — a charm that has all the effect of novelty — if indeed it is not. A marked peculiarity of the author is the Irishy abandon or neck-or-nothingness of his manner. He writes as if he held it a sin to keep us waiting a moment — either for grammar or any thing else . . . But [page 640:] all this is hypercriticism: — the book is an admirable book, and Mr. Headley is an admirable man (BJ, II, 387) .

The earlier notice ends in much the same vein,

Find whatever fault we may with his, doubt his facts, denounce his grammer [[grammar]], grow angry over his prejudices, we cannot fail to read whatever he writes, and rising superior to our necessities as reviewers, read on to the end (BJ, II, 75) .

This is, I think, Poe’s.

* 163. HUNT’S MERCHANTS’ (sic) MAGAZINE. AUGUST.

. . . a pregnant example of what may be effected by combined talent and energy. The work is undoubtedly the best property of its kind in America . . . The present article is not more remarkable for the lucidity and profundity of its views, than for the vigor, simplicity, and general excellence of its style (BJ, II, 75) .

In a November 8 notice of this periodical, which is definitely Poe’s, one finds:

Of the editor of ‘The Merchant’s Magazine’ we have more than once expressed our opinion — that he is one of the most remarkable men of his day (BJ, II, 275) .

The August 9 notice commends Hunt highly for his enterprise: “The Merchant’s Magazine was created, and is now owned, edited, and conducted generally by Mr. Hunt alone” (BJ, II, 76) . The evidence is strong enough to give Poe the notice with an asterisk.

(?) 164. GODEY’S LADY’S BOOK FOR AUGUST.

* 165. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

We thank the New York Correspondent of the Cincinnati Courier for his good opinion, although given cum grano salis — but we would thank him at the same time to stick to the truth. He is right only in the proportion of one word in ten (BJ, II, 79) .

So begins Poe’s reply to the account of the “flare-up” in the Journal office, which has been quoted already in the first chapter of this section.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy. [page 641:]

AUGUST 16, 1845.

* 168. GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE FOR AUGUST.

Lowed wrote Briggs on August 21, 1845:

In the last B. J. he (Poe) has accused me of plagiarism and misquoted Wordsworth to sustain his charge. ‘Armour rustling on the walls, On the blood of Clifford calls‘, he quotes, italicising rustling as the point of resemblance. The word is really ‘rusting’ — you will find the passage in Wordsworth’s ’Song sung at Brougham Castle‘, &c. My metaphor was drawn from some old Greek or Roman story which was in my mind a which Poe, who makes such a scholar of himself ought to have known . . . Any one who had ever read the whole of Wordsworth’s poem would see that there was no resemblance between the two passages.(1)

In the notice Poe wrote:

Mr. Lowell’s poem, ‘To the Future‘, has a noble commencement, and is altogether a noble composition — although in the last stanza is a plagiarism — e.g. . . . This is Mr. L’s — but Wordsworth has either the following lines, or something resembling them — for we quote altogether from memory . . . Except in its versification er. Lowell has by no means improved the idea of Wordsworth — although ’self-clanging’ has great force (BJ, II, 88) .

Poe does not italicize ‘rustling’ nor refer to it in any way. This same article points out a plagiarism in a Longfellow poem.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

(?) 167. THE AMERICAN REVIEW FOR AUGUST.

(?) 168. THE DEMOCRATIC REVIEW.

(?) 169. THE LONDON FOREIGN QUARTERLY.

* 170. THE CHARACTERS OF SHAKESPEARE. BY WILLIAM HAZLITT.

For proof that this is Poe’s see pages 5-6 of this chapter.

The other notices for this week are all short. [page 642:]

(?) 171. THE SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER FOR AUGUST.

(?) 172. THE FARMER’S LIBRARY AND MONTHLY JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE. EDITED BY JOHN S. SKINNER.

(?) 173. THE LOWELL OFFERING.

174. HARPER’ S ILLUMINATED AND PICTORIAL BIBLE. NO. 35.

The small cuts are without exception excellent, send many of them are not only admirable as mere specimens of wood engraving, but, as designs, belong to the highest class of art . . . The heads of the prophets are full, of force and character. There is evidently no falling off in any portion of this enterprise (BJ, II, 89) .

175. THE DUTY OF AMERICAN WOMEN TO THEIR COUNTRY.

This volume is put forth anonymously, and has no preface . . . It may be, however, the work of Mrs. Kirkland. At all events it is the work of some woman of very bold and vigorous intellect possibly of Mrs. Child or Miss Fuller. Its propositions speak for themselves. The design is to . . . The work is lucidly, earnestly, and vigorously written; and we recommend it to all readers sufficiently unprejudiced not to mistake ardor for folly — the enthusiastic for the visionary (BJ, II, 90) .

176. ESSAYS. BY JOHN ABERCROMBIE.

Of course we shall not say a word in commendation of the truly great author of ‘The Intellectual Powers’ (BJ, II, 90) .

177. THE CROCK OF GOLD. BY MARTIN FARQUHAR TUPPER.

Mr. Willis, in one of his late Letters to the ‘Mirror‘, has said a good deal which may serve to excite interest in Martin Farquahar Tupper. The only point about which the author of ‘Melanie‘(1) is deceived is the age of the author. Mr. Tupper, we believe, is a much older man then Mr. W. supposes him. His talents, however, are scarcely overrated. ‘The Crock of Gold’ is a simple, picturesque story . . . The style is terse, succinct, and often sketchy. The narrative is skillfully managed, and frequently rises into what the critics now and then call ‘power’ . . . (BJ, II, 90) . [page 643:]

178. TRAVELS IN NORTH AMERICA. BY CHARLES LYELL.

A work full of the most authentic information, and acute remark . . . We feel that we need say little about this volume — for it will be purchased and read by all who wish to keep up with the science of the day, or who have any claim, even, to be regarded as ‘general readers’ (BJ, II, 90) .

179. THE WANDERING JEW. BY EUGENE SUE. NO. XVI.

(?) 180. THE LONDON QUARTERLY REVIEW.

(?) 181. A CHANCE MEDLEY OF LIGHT MATTER. BY COLLEY GRATTAN.

(?) 182. PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE NORLD. BY JOHN FROST. NO. VII.

* 183. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

In alluding to an article, by ourselves, contained in the latter Magazine,(1) the Gazette says in substance: ‘Mr. Poe, however, is one of those who can never find any thing to admire in any thing written by Mr. Longfellow‘. How this is doing us the grossest injustice — and this no one better knows than the inditor of the accusation (BJ, II, 93) .

For fifty-two lines Poe explains his attitude toward Longfellow and justifies his criticisms.

The PROOF READER of the August number of Godey has made us say of Mr. Lowell’s ‘Conversations’ what indeed we should be very sorry to say, vizi: . . . By the omission of a dash, this pare-graph was made part and parcel of our commentary on Mr. Lowell , to whom it had no reference whatever (BJ, II, 95) .(2)

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with marginal notes by Mrs. Whitman.

AUGUST 23, 1845.

* 184. THE POETICAL WRITINGS OF MRS. ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH.

In Godey’s for December, 1846, Poe published a second and longer review of Mrs. Oakes Smith. That review, dealing mainly with “The Sinless Child” is only an elaboration of this. Though there is no actual quoting from the Journal review — the two were perhaps [page 644:] too close in time to allow even Poe to use that method of composition — they coincide exactly in point of view. Here: “‘The Sinless Child’ . . . was originally published in the ’Southern Literary Messenger‘, where it attracted much notice . . . (BJ, II, 103; H, XII, 228) ; in Godey’s: “‘‘The Sinless Child’ was originally published in the ’Southern Literary Messenger‘, where it at once attracted much attention . . .” (GLB, ???,???; H, XIII, 78) . Both conclude that the conception is “original, but somewhat forced”; the execution effective in parts, but the conduct feeble; the denouement “obscure and inconsequential“. The episode of “The Stepmother” is the finest in the poem; it is quoted in full in both reviews. The parallels throughout are not verbal, but nonetheless striking. The Journal review ends with quoting Mrs. Smith’s “The Water” and Longfellow’s “Rain in Summer“, from the August number of Graham’s:

If this is not a plagiarism, and a very bold one, on the part of Professor Longfellow, will any body be kind enough to tell us what it is? (BJ, II, 103; H, XII, 233) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

* 185. PROSE AND VERSE. BY THOMAS HOOD. PART II.

Week before last we had some general comments on Hood’s genius and peculiarities, and gave a detailed account of the contents of Part I of his writings, as republished in the ‘Library of Choice Reading’ . . . Its effect arises from the grotesquerie reach, in our previous article, we referred to the vivid Fancy of the author, impelled by hypochondrissis (BJ, II, 104; H, XII, 234) .

The August 9 review of Hood, which has been conclusively showmen to be Poe’s, has:

In the genius of Hood is the result of vivid Fancy impelled, or controlled — certainly tinctured, at all points, by hypochondriasis (BJ, II, 72; H, XII, 217) . [page 645:]

The “Poetic Principle“, H, XIV, 287, 11.25-28, paraphrases three lines here, H, XII, 234, 11.16-19.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with marginal lineations.

* 186. DASHES AT LIFE WITH A FREE PENCIL. BY N. P. WILLIS.

We have so frequently spoken in the warmest terms of admiration, of the brilliant and versatile abilities of Mr. Willis, that there is really nothing left for us to say . . . We look upon Mr. Willis as one of the truest men of letters in America. About him there is no particle of pretence. His works show his fine genius as it is. They convey the man. Whatever idea is gleaned of him through his books, will be confirmed upon personal acquaintance . . . (BJ, II, 104; H, XII, 234-5) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

187. THE LONE STAR. BY I. WILLMER DALLAM.

We have not read this novel so carefully as we could wish — but shall do so and speak of it hereafter. Some na“sages are written with power. I. Willmer Dallam is perhaps a nom de plume (BJ, II, I04) .

188. HARPER’S ILLUMINATED AND NEW PICTORIAL BIBLE. NO. 30.

This work proceeds with undiminished spirit. We repeat that it is by far the best Bible ever published in America. (BJ, II, 104) .

In the August 16 notice of this work Poe wrote.

Upon the whole it is the most magnificent Bible ever put to press (BJ, II, 90) .

(?) 189. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

This is the column which contains the reply to an attack, in the Mirror on Poe’s review of Ettore Fiamoresca, which has already been quoted in part.(1) That Poe is the writer is clear enough. There is here, also, a notice of McHenry’s death which is a virtual [page 646:] paraphrase of the “Autography” article on the author of The Antediluvians.(1) Emphasizing also Poe’s authorship is a paragraph on Hawthorne beginning “During a recent visit to Boston” (BJ, II, 119-20; H, XII, 235-6) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

AUGUST 30, 1845.

190. PROSE AND VERSE. BY THOMAS HOOD. PART II.

Of this number of the library we said a few words in our last, but we shall be pardons for referring to it again . . . Had we seen this piece before penning our first notice of Hood, we should have had much hesitation in speaking of Fancy and Fantasy as his predominant features (BJ, II, 119-20; H, XII, 235-6) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

191. THE INDICATOR AND COMPANION. BY LEIGH HUNT. PART II.

I am convinced that this is Poe’s. The evidence of style and approach would be sufficient; however, one finds here, though stated more baldly, the attitude in the April 19 Poe review of Hunt and the Journal reviews of Hazlitt.(3)

This volume contains some two or three papers which are worth preserving — which have in them the elements of life — and which will leave a definite end perhaps a permanent impression upon every one who reads them . . . The tone is not that of a bold genius uttering vigorous things carelessly and inconsiderately, with contempt or neglect of method or completeness, but rather that of a naturally immethodical and inaccurate intellect, making; a certain air of ruggedness and insouciance the means of exalting the commonplace into the semblance of originality and strength. Hunt has written many agreeable papers, but no great ones. His points will bear no steady examination . . . As a [page 647:] critic he is merely saucy, or lackadaisical, or falsely enthusiastic, or at best pointedly conceited. His judgment is not worth a rush . . . In this condition we require repose — which is the antipode of the style of And since for the ennuye he has insufficient stimulus, it is clear that as an author he is fit for very little, if really for anything at all (BJ, II, 120-1; H, XII, 237-8) .

192. INTRODUCTORY LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY. BY THOMAS ARNOLD.

We take it for granted that there are few of our readers unacquainted with the great celebrity of these Lectures, or with the high estimation in which they are held by the historical scholars of Europe. We feel called upon, therefore, to say only a few words of the book (BJ, II, 121) .

193. A TREATISE ON DOMESTIC ECONOMY. BY MISS CATHERINE E. BEECHER.

This volume is so well known, and so thoroughly appreciated, that we need only call attention to the issue of an improved edition (BJ, II, 121) .

* 194. SIMMS’ MAGAZINE FOR AUGUST.

As a matter of course we find Mr. Simms agreeing with ourselves, “The Democratic Review‘, and in fact with all the unprejudiced critics of the country, in condemning, nearly altogether, the very mediocre poems of Mr. Lord (BJ, II, 121) .

Poe reviewed Lord’s poems in the May 24 Broadway Journal; this notice, therefore, may go into the canon with an asterisk.

195. HARPER’S ILLUMINATED AND ILLUSTRATED SHAKSPEARE. NOS. 63-64.

It is difficult to avoid enthusiasm while speaking of these admirable plates. The edition should be in the hands of every one who reads — or sees (BJ, II, 121) .

196. THE MISSION. BY CAPT. MARAYATT (sic) .

Captain Marryatt is not surpassed by any writer of this age in the faculty of interesting the youthful mind. These two neat duodecimos are full of entertainment . . . (BJ, II, 12I) .

Though Poe had nothing but contempt for Marryatt considered as an artist or even a serious writer, as light reading, as popular [page 648:] reading, he always admitted his interest.(1)

197. THE ABBEY OF INNISMOYLE.

The story is quite celebrated. It is full not only of romantic but of religious interest (BJ, II, 121) .

198. THE FLORENTINE HISTORIES. BY NICCOLO MACHIAVELLI.

Neither ‘The Florentine Histories’ nor Niccolo Machiavelli need be commended by us. The author of ‘The Prince’ was a man of profound thought, of great sagacity, of indomitable will . . . He has been grossly maligned, not because misunderstood in himself, but in his relations to his age and countrymen. The ‘Florentine Histories’ show his great powers — but not in their clearest light (BJ, II, 121-2) .

199. A LATIN GRAMMAR. BY JAMES ROSS. EDITED BY N. C. BROOKS.

. . . some important improvements of which we may take occasion to speak more fully hereafter: — as also of his . . .

200. FIRST LESSONS IN LATIN.

In the Journal for October 4, Poe noticed at more length the Grammar. The notice ends with the quotation of a letter and this comment: “Of the ‘Latin Lessons’ here alluded to, we spoke in a previous number” (BJ, II, 192) .

All three of these notices, I believe, are Poe’s.

(?) 201. THE HISTORY OF THE VOLUNTEERS OF 1782. BY THOMAS McNEVIN.

(?) 202. THE TREASURY OF HISTORY.

(?) 203. BLACKWOOD’S MAGAZINE.

204. GODEY’S LADY’S BOOK.

Mr. Simms has a Mesmeric sketch, rather overstrained . . . Mr. Godey maintains and will maintain his ground (BJ, II, 122) . [page 649:]

205. THE EDINBURGH REVIEW FOR JULY.

‘The Vestiges of Creation’ is slashingly condemned. The reviewer says . . . These opinions are just. The ‘Vestiges’ is merely a well-written and very suggestive romance; — but bad English does not look well in a quarterly, and ‘hurts our better feelings’ (BJ, II, 122) .

(?) 206. AN ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY. NOS. IX & X.

207. COSMOS. BY ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT.

We shall speak of it, in detail, as it proceeds (BJ, II, 122) .

(?) 208. GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE.

209. ARTHUR’S MAGAZINE.

For September, was received at so late a day, that we are unable to do it justice this week. We shall recur to it. It looks well (BJ, II, 122) .

* 210. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

There exists an abundance of evidence for the authorship of this column, though it is not signed in the Whitman copy. Quotations from three paragraphs will be sufficient:

We ourselves have had the honor of being pirated without mercy . . . we have written paper after paper which attracted no notice at all until it appeared as original in ‘Bentley’s Miscellany’ or the ‘Paris Charivari‘. The ‘Boston Notion’ once abused us very lustily for having written ‘The House of Usher‘. Not long afterwards Bentley published it anonymously, as original with itself, — whereupon ‘The Notion‘, having forgotten that we wrote it, not only lauded it ad nauseam, but copied it in toto (BJ, II, 125) .

A very pretty poem, which (unfortunately for us) we did not write, appears in Wednesday’s ‘Tribune’ with the initials E. A. P. appended (BJ, II, 126) .

We thank the New-York Correspondent of the ‘Cincinnati Gazette‘, for the gentlemanly tone of his reply to some late pettish comments of our own. We say only a portion of one of his letters. Had we seen more, we should have at onto, through the precision and purity of his style, have recognized a friend (BJ, II, 126) . [page 650:]

The “pettish comments” are to be found in the “Editorial Miscellany” of August 2.

SEPTEMBER 6, 1845.

* 211. GENIUS AND CHARACTER OF BURNS.

That Professor Wilson is one of the most gifted and altogether one of the most remarkable men of his day, few persons will be weak enough to deny. His ideality — his enthusiastic appreciation of the beautiful, conjoined with a temperament compelling him into action and expression, has been the root of his preeminent success . . . In a word, Professor Wilson is what he is because he possesses ideality, energy, and audacity, each in a very unusual degree . . . It is sheer audacity, however, to which, perhaps, after all, he is the most particularly indebted (BJ, II, 136) .

In the Graham’s, 1842, January notice of Wilson, Poe wrote:

No man of his age has shown greater versatility of talent, and few, of any age, richer powers of imagination . . . His high animal spirits give a dashing, free, hearty and devil-may-care tone to all his compositions — a tone which has done more towards establishing his literary popularity and dominion than any single trait for which he is remarkable (GM, XX, 72) .

Here:

He is no analyst . . . His criticisms are emphatically on the surface — superficial. His opinions are mere dicta (BJ, II, 136) .

there:

His tone is often flippant . . . His analysis . . . is nevertheless deficient . . . In short, the opinions of Professor Wilson can never be safely adopted without examination (GM, XX, 72) .

These two notices are alike in method: the first half of each points out Wilson’s merits; the last half, his demerits.

Poe writes here: “To the lovers of mere rhapsody we can recommend the volume as one likely to interest them” (BJ, II, 136) ; in “Editorial Miscellany“, October 4, he wrote: “The chief of the [page 651:] rhapsodists . . . is the ignorant and egotistical Wilson . . . No man ever penned worse criticism or better rhodomontade” (BJ, II, 199) . A sentence or two more will clinch the matter:

It is a composition which delights through the low of its imagination, but which repels comparatively of course; through the niaiseries of its general conduct and construction . . . He persuades — he bewilders — he overwhelms — at times he enrages — but there has been no period at which he ever demonstrated anything beyond his own utter incapacity for demonstration (BJ, II, 136) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

* 212. FESTUS. BY PHILIP JAMES BAILEY.

The poem made quite a stir in England on its publication six years ago, says the reviewer; but only within the last eight or nine months has America felt the repercussions.

This is the more strange, since ‘Festus’ is, beyond question, a poem of the most remarkable power, and since, in general, we are ludicrously on the alert to catch the echoes of the British opinion in respect to even the most nonsensical books. We shall speak of ‘Festus’ hereafter, at length, as its peculiarities deserve. At present, we have read it only in snatches . . . Horne, the author of ‘Orion’ (no common nee and no common poem) . . . This sanest happily convoys much of ‘the prevalent tone of the whole poem — its imperiousness — its egotism — its energy — its daring — its ruggedness — its contempt of law in great things and small (BJ, II, 136-7) .

Poe never reviewed Festus at length. He did mention it again, however, in the “Editorial Miscellany” of December 16.

‘The New York Evangelist’ . . . has a strongly condemnatory review of ‘Festus’ frcsra which we quote a few passages, without altogether acquiescing in the opinions expressed (BJ, II, 341) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

213. GERTRUDE.

. . . an interesting, although by no means powerful story of ordinary life . . . greatly praised by the [page 652:] more decorous and influential of the British journals (BJ, II, 137) .

214. MODERN COOKERY. BY ELIZA. ACTON. REVISED BY MRS. HALL.

We give the full title as conveying the best possible idea of the book. This title and the name of Mrs. Hall are all sufficient assurances of its excellence (BJ, II, 137) .

(?) 215. THE WHITE SLAVE.

(?) 216. HARPER’S ILLUMINATED AND NEW PICTORIAL BIBLE. NO. 38.

* 217. HUNT’S MERCHANT’ S MAGAZINE FOR SEPTEMBER.

In the Journal for November 8, as we have seen, Poe said: “Of the editor of ‘The Merchant’s Magazine’ we have more than once expressed our opinion” (BJ, II, 275) . In the August 9 notice of this periodical, which was given to Poe with an asterisk on the evidence afforded by the November notice, he wrote: “The work is undoubtedly the best property of its kind in America” (BJ, II, 76) . Here he repeats: “The Merchant’s Magazine’ is unquestionably the most valuable journal of its kind in the world” (BJ, II, 137) . This notice, then, also is definitely Poe’s.

(?) 218. THE AMERICAN COMMON-SCHOOL READER AND SPEAKER. BY JOHN GOLDSBURG.

219. THE TRUE CHILD. BY MRS. E. OAKES SMITH.

The Preface is, in its way, a model of good writing, and this is saying a great deal — for Prefaces are difficult things, not to write — but to write well (BJ, II, 137-8) .

(?) 220. THE ORACLES OF SHAKSPEARE. BY ROB ERT HAMILTON.

(?) 221. THE DEVOTIONAL FAMILY BIBLE. BY REVEREND ALEXANDER FLETCHER FLETCHER.

(?) 222. THE KNICKERBOCKER FOR SEPTEMBER.

For these comments on the performances at the Park we are indebted to our musical editor. [page 653:] In especial, we see no necessity for reconciling the inconsistencies of Pauline — ed. B. J. (BJ, II, 138, ftn.) .(1)

It is significant that Poe takes pains to point out the fact that this article is not his, but the work of Watson. The suggestion of the footnote, however, is perhaps not strong enough to allow the assumption, as a practical principle, that Poe would have so commented on any editorial matter which was not his own. The rest of the column is filled by a quotation from Murdoch.

* 223. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Poe prints here for the first time the epigram on the Journal review of Saul. with his assertion that he has not read the poem. part of this paragraph he reprinted in “Marginalia“.(2) This is not signed in the Whitman copy, but there is a marginal textual correction in Poe’s hand. Six lines from the bottom of page 142, right column, “collection” is corrected to “repository“.

224. ESSAYS OF ELIA.

Of all the British essayists Charles Lamb is the most original — if we may be permitted to use comparatively a purely positive term. He is the founder of that school in which Douglas Jerrold and Cornelius Webbe have been the most successful disciples — aped at second hand, or at twentieth hand, by the William A. Joneses of our own continent — a set of litted people, who, wriggling hither and thither like the entozoa, grow fat, like theta, on the substance of Alien brains. Of all original men, too, Lamb, we think has the fewest demerits. Of gross faults he has none at till. His merest extravagances have about them a symmetry which entitles them to critical respect (BJ, I1, 151) . [page 654:]

And Poe — for Poe I am convinced it is — proceeds to print “my first Play“. On William Jones Poe, at this period at least, wasted little admiration. He dealt deftly with that gentleman in the September 27 “Editorial Miscellany”:

Mr. Jones is what may be termed an ‘elegant’ essayist of a by-gone School. His articles are always graceful, pointed, gentlemanly in thought and tone. They lack vigor, originality, and consecutiveness. They leave no definite impression. (BJ, 1I, 183) .

225. STUDIES IN RELIGION.

The work consists of twenty-four well-written and instructive essays, which from their brevity and character we may as well denominate sub-sermons or sermonoids (BJ, II, 182) .

* 226. SHORT PATENT SERMONS. BY DOW JR.

Who Dow is, we have never yet been able to say. For anything we know to the contrary, he may be our old friend of the United States’ Journal. no have heard hint discourse by the four in a strain very much akin to that of the volume before us (BJ, II, 152) .

This is evidence conclusive, in conjunction with the other existing evidence. Dow was a friend of Poe.

227. MY UNCLE HOBSON AND I. BY PASCAL JONES.

We have not had an opportunity of reading it thoroughly . . . The announcement on the cover is in bad policy and worst taste (BJ, II, 112) .

228. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Copying, for example, a little poem of our own called ‘Lenore‘, the Chambersburg editor alters ‘the damned earth’ into ‘the cursed earth‘. Now, we prefer it damned, and will have it so (BJ, II, 158) .

SEPTEMBER 20, 1845.

229. THE AMERICAN SHEPHERD. BY L. A. MORRELL.

The English treatises, although numerous and comprehensive, are totally unadaptable to our wants. Everything needed is here abundantly supplied. The work is a perfect manual (BJ, II, 167) . [page 655:]

230. THE BOSOM FRIEND.

(?) 231. THE WANDERING JEW. BY EUGENE SUE. NO. 17.

232. A CYCLOPAEDIA OF SEVERAL THOUSAND PRACTICAL RECEIPTS, etc. BY ARNOLD JAMES COOLEY. NO. 3.

We have already noticed in frill the first and second numbers. And now merely repeat the title in full, as the best means of calling attention to the work, and showing its design (BJ, II, 167) .

There is a problem here. In the Journal for August 9 Poe announced the first number (and according to the printed title, only the first number) in three sentences:

We give in full the comprehensive title of this work, as the best mode of explaining its design. No. 1 has just b“n issued, at 25 cents. It proceeds (alphabetically) as far as the word BEANS (BJ, I, 75) .

This is not “noticed in full“, and I can find no mention of the second number in the Journal; nor can I find elsewhere a notice of this work which may be Poe’s. It seems that he has been the victim of a memory error. On August 30 Poe announced the appearance of “An Encyclopaedia of Domestic Economy“. Perhaps he has confused the two works.

233. AGNES SERLE. BY MISS ELLEN PICKERING.

She seldom greatly excites, but invariably produces the most agreeable kind of interest . . . it is, in many respects, a close imitation of that excellent fiction ’Santo Sebastieno, or the Young Protector’ (BJ, II, 167) .

In Burton’s, November, 1859, and February, 1840, Poe has two notices of Miss Pickering which reveal this attitude.(1) [page 656:]

(?) 234. GOWAN’S BIBLIOTHECA AMERICANA. EDITED BY GABRIEL FURMAN.

* 235. DEMOCRATIC REVIEW FOR SEPTEMBER.

In this, the only long notice of the week, Mrs. Osgood is once again described as “the most graceful of American poetesses“. The greater part of the article is a tirade against William Jones:

There is only one really bad article in the number, and that is insufferable: nor do we think it the less a nuisance because it inflicts upon ourselves individually a passage of maudlin compliment about our being a most ‘ingenious critic’ and ‘Dross poet’ with some other things of a similar kind. We thank for his good word no man who gives palpable evidence, in other cases than our own, of his incapacity to distinguish the false from the true — the right from the wrong. If we are an ingenious critic, or a prose poet, it is no because Mr. William Jones says so (BJ, II, 168) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with marginal note.

236. THE AMERICAN REVIEW FOR SEPTEMBER.

Here one finds Poe’s impatience with Lord and his admiration for Wallace:

. . . a pungent and discriminating review of numberous late poems — principally abortions — Mr. Lord’s among the number . . . William Wallace has a noble poem entitled ’Statuary’ from which we venture to make an extract . . . (BJ, II, 169) .

237. ESSAYS OF ELIA. BY CHARLES LAMB. PART II.

In our last we noticed Part I of these Essays (BJ, II, 169) .

* 238. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

The first paragraphs deal with plagiarism in the unmistakable Poe vein. Campbell pointed out that this is “in part identical with No. 188 of Marginalia” as printed by Griswold, III, 570.(1) One find also: [page 567:]

. . . as broached in a late Magazine paper of our own, entitled ‘Mesmeric Revelation’ . . . our sentence . . . as we wrote then . . . (BJ, II, 174) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

SEPTEMBER 27, 1845.

* 239. THE PROSE WORKS OF JOHN MILTON, WITH A BIOGRAPHICAL INTRODUCTION BY RUFUS WILMOT GRISWOLD.

In January or early February, 1849, Poe wrote Griswold: “By glancing at what I have published about you, (. . . Notice in B. Journal, 1845 . . .) . . .“.(1) This is the only notice of Griswold in the Broadway Journal.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with marginal textual corrections and lineations. The first clause of the notice is marked through.

* 240. BIG ABEL AND THE LITTLE MANHATTAN. BY CORNELIUS MATHEWS.

This notice ends: “More hereafter” (BJ, II, 178) . And more there was, hereafter; but it appeared in Godey’s Lady’s Book, in November, 1845. It must, then, have been written about the time of the composition of its Broadway Journal companion. The two tally exactly point by point, save that the Godey’s has much quotation, and this one none at all. The Godey’s is an elaboration in paraphrase from the earlier. Certain sentences should be compared. Here: “The conception and execution of this book are both original“ (BJ, II, 177) ; there: “This is by all means an original book, original in conception, conduct, and tone“’ (GLB, ???,???; H, XII, 73) .

Here:

The narrative (if such it may be termed) (2) forms merely the upper current of the true theme which flows below. The principal object is that of a suggestive parallel between the present and primitive condition of the [page 658:] Island of Manhattan. A secondary purpose is that of gossip about New York localities and customs — especially those appertaining to the terrae incognitae of remote districts, such as the East Bowery (BJ, II, 177) ;

there:

The most obvious design is to gossip, or rather give voice to under-toned comments about the condition of the Island of Manhattan, and, more especially, of the great city which oppresses its Southern end. A less superficial purpose is that of contrasting the present condition with that under the aboriginal dynasty — of contrasting, apart from conventionality, the true values of the savage and the civilized state(1) (GLB, ???,??? ; H, XIII, 74) .

It is the middle part — the tracing of the narrative — which the Godey’s review expands to some length. There is no need to record the parallels here. The Journal notice ends:

The book, upon the whole, does great credit to its author. The conception is forcible and unique . . . the style . . . original. The great defect of the work is indefiniteness. The design is not sufficiently well made out (BJ, II, 178) ;

the Godey’s:

Upon the whole, Mr. Mathews has written an ingenious, an on -rival, end altogether, an excellent book . . . Its chief defect is a very gross indefiniteness, not of conception, but of execution (GLB, ???,???; H, XIII, 77-8) .

The Godey’s article, of course, is signed; the Journal notice, then, is clearly Poe’s.

241. PURITANISM. BY THOMAS W. COIT.

A remarkably nervous, logical, and (to our minds at least) convincing book . . . This is a serious charge — and not more serious than true (BJ, II, 178) . [page 659:]

242. THE CITIZEN OF A REPUBLIC. BY ANSALDO CEBA.

If are regard only our dondeption of the word ‘Republic‘, we shall find his title a misnamer . . . It is, indeed, a noble composition, replete with learning, thought, and purest classicism. If deficient at all, it is in vigor — it has more of the Ciceronian character than pleases ourselves individually. It was written in the senility of of [[sic]] its author (BJ, II, 178) .

(?) 243. AN ENCYCLOPAEDIA CF DOMESTIC ECONOMY. NO. XI.

(?) 244. THE WANDERING JEW. BY EUGENE SUE. NO. XVIII.

245. THE DEVOTIONAL FAMILY BIBLE. BY THE REV. ALEXANDER FLETCHER.

We repeat the full title by way of most readily describing the work (BJ, II, 178) .

240. JOURNAL OF THE TEXIAN EXPEDITION AGAINST MIER. BY GEN. THOMAS J. GREEN.

The title fully conveys the general design . . . The reflections on the political relations . . . are if not profound, at least acute . . . By way of instancing the general manner of the book . . . (BJ, II, 178) .

* 247. THE MAY-FLOWER FOR 1846.

In the Journal f or December 20, Poe wrote: “We have twice before noticed ‘The May-flower‘. . .” (BJ, II, 374) . Poe had announced it in the “Editorial “Miscellany” of August 9.(1) This three-way linking of the notices warrants this being given to Poe with an asterisk.

248. THE MISCELLANEOUS WORKS OF THOMAS ARNOLD.

The London edition had

. . . many important omissions as well as redundancies. In the American edition (now issued) the former are supplied and the latter avoided . . . The articles omitted are merely ephemera never meant for preservation . . . of the English edition, in which the main object seems to have been the making of a book sufficiently bulky to sell at a certain price (BJ, II, 179) . [page 660:]

249. WRONGS OF AMERICAN WOMEN. PART I. THE ELLIOTT FAMILY. BY CHARLES BURDETT.

The story is one of intense pathos, and the greater portion of it is absolutely true . . . (BJ, II, 179) .

* 250. INTRODUCTION TO THE AMERICAN COMMON-SCHOOL READER AND SPEAKER. BY RUSSELL AND GOLDSURG.

We observe that a poem entitled ‘The Ocean’ is printed anonymously. It is a beautiful lyric, and its author should be known — J. Augustus Shea, lately deceased (BJ, II, 179-80) .

In the “Editorial Miscellany” of August 23 Poe announced Shea’s death.

As a poet his reputation was high — but by no means so high as his deserts. His ‘Ocean’ is really one of the most spirited lyrics ever published (BJ, II, 110) .

In the light of the evidence of the office set-up, this parallel has sufficient strength to warrant the inclusion of this notice in the canon with an asterisk.

251. THE ELEMENTS OF MORALITY, INCLUDING POLITY. BY WILLIAM WHEEWELL.

. . . his work on the Inductive Sciences is universally regarded as of the very highest authority . . . he work can hardly fail to become a text book in all our colleges and higher schools . . . (BJ, II, 150) .

* 252. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

In our notice last week of an article on ‘American Humor’ by Mr. William Jones, we mentioned . . . (BJ, II, 183) .

In last week’s notice of the “Democratic Review” Poe devoted most of the space to Jones’ article. There are here also references back to the paragraph on plagiarism in the “Miscellany” of the last week and to the paragraph on the Journal’s contributors in the same column.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy. [page 661:]

OCTOBER 4, 1845.

* 253. THE WIGWAM AND THE CABIN. BY WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS.

In a recent number of our Journal we spoke of Mr. Simms as ‘the best novellist which this country has, upon the whole, produced;’ and this is our deliberate opinion . . . Mr. Simms has exercised a very remarkable influence upon the literature of his country . . . nor do we regard this influence as in any degree the less important because a Mr. William A. Jones’ regards slightingly the mass of his romantic and poetical efforts’ (BJ, II, 190-1) .

In the September notice of the Democratic Review Poe wrote:

Mr. Jones ‘regards slightingly the mass of his romantic and poetical efforts’ — the romantic and poetical efforts of decidedly the best novelist which this country has ever yet, upon the whole, produced (BJ, II, 188) .

The earlier notice, and so the later, is definitely Poe’s.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

* 254. BUBBLES FROM THE BRUNNEN OF WASSAU.

For proof that this is Poe’s see Messenger chapter, pages ???.

* 255. LADY MARY. BY CHAS. B. TAYLOR.

Since our last number, in which we announced the issue of this beautiful little work . . . It is admirably written and well adapted to its end (BJ, II, I92) .

The announcement of publication Poe made at the end of the critical notices in the last number. The evidence here warrants the inclusion of the notice in the canon without question.

255. SERMONS ON CERTAIN OF THE LESS PROMINENT FACTS AND IN REFERENCES IN SACRED STORY. BY HENRY MELVILLE.

We give the titles of the several sermons, as the best way of conveying, in brief, the character of the boot. (BJ, II, 192) . [page 662:]

257. A LATIN GRAMMAR. BY JAMES ROSS. EDITED BY N. C. BROOKS.

This is a judicious attempt on the part of Mr. Brooks (no less dintinguished as an imaginative and graceful poet than by his classical acquirements) ot [[to]] restore the Latin Grammar of Dr. Ross to the position it once held . . . There can be no doubt that the book, in its original form, had many demerits (BJ, II, 192) .

In “Editorial Miscellany“, January 3, 1846, Poe wrote of Brooks:

well known as a terse and vigorous writer, as well as a poet of much absolute power and refined taste, has lately been rendering substantial service to education, by preparing a series of works for the use of schools and colleges (BJ, II, 408) .

Poe here, as it has been observed, refers back to his August 30 notice of Brooks’ Latin Lessons.

258. BLACKWOOD’S MAGAZINE FOR SEPTEMBER.

‘North’s Specimens of the British Critics’ is continued in a paper replete with coarse malignity, and the customary Wilsonic rant (BJ, II, 192) .

(?) 259. THE BOOK OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE. A CYCLOPAEDIA OF SEVERAL THOUSAND PRACTICAL RECEIPTS, etc. NO. IV.

(?) 260. THE TREASURY OF HISTORY. NO. IX.

(?) 261. SIMMS’ MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR SEPTEMBER.

262. GODEY’S MAGAZINE FOR OCTOBER.

His magazine has about it a ‘keeping‘„ a consistency, which is one of the secret indications of long and prosperous like . . . ‘that has become of firs. Osgocd’ Her papers were wont to be the charm of the ‘Book’ (BJ, II, 193) .

263. GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE FOR OCTOBER.

Mrs. Osgood furnishes ’ Leonora L‘Estrange‘, one of her invariably graceful compositions. We purloin from it an epigrammatic song . . . (BJ, II, 193) . [page 663:]

We have seen how Poe stressed the “grace” of Mrs. Osgood. In the Journal, December 13, the Godey’s, March, 1846, and the Messenger, August, 1849, reviews of her he stressed also her epigrammatic quality.

264. THE ARISTIDEAN FOR SEPTEMBER.

looks and speaks remarkably well. Its papers are all pointed and forcible . . . There is a searching review of Hirst’s Poems — a good thing for everybody but Mr. Hirst: — this is a very laughable article . . . also exceedingly pungent . . . ‘The Aristidean’ is, upon the whole, an admirable journal, and will do good service (BJ, II, 193) .

265. A POPULAR TREATISE, ON THE SCIENCE OF ASTROLOGY.

It is not to be classed with the Cracula, find Napoleon-Books of fate, but is a straight-forward analysis and exposition of the science of astrology (BJ, II, 193) .

* 266. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

For this column., discussing plagiarism, Jos. Webster from Donne; referring back to the Whittier-Bulwer parallel noticed in the last two numbers and to the two “Miscellany” paragraphs on William Jones; and denouncing; “our subserviency to British criticism“, there is abundant proof. Two pieces of direct evidence will suffice. Of Wilson:

Not long ago we ourselves pointed out a series of similar inanities in his review of Miss parrot’s poems . . . (BJ, II, 199) .

The discussion of Wilson’s “gross blunders arising from sheer ignorance” appears in the January 4 review of Miss Barrett. Again:

In a very complimentary notice, by Miss fuller, of ‘Tales of Edgar A. Poe’ . . . We bow to the well-considered opinions of Miss fuller, whom, of course, we very highly respect — but we have [page 664:] in vain endeavored to understand, in these cases, the grounds of her objections (BJ, II, 200) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with marginal notes and lineations.

OCTOBER 11, 1845.

* 267. THE BROKEN VOW AND OTHER POEMS. BY AMANDA M. EDMOND.

So far as I em aware Poe never mentioned this poetess before or after this instance. The tone of the notice, however, is unmistakable:

We do not remember having before seen any one poem of the collection. They are bit no means impressive. The subjects, generally, are such as find favor in boarding-schools . . . Some of them, from their character, have no right to the title of poem . . . In the minor merits Miss Edmond is not particularly deficient . . . but in the very first sentence of the Preface there is an ambiguity which, in a second edition, should be cleared up . . . Now a poetical contribution, so offered„ presupposes in the author only about the ten thousandth part of what Miss Edmond (no doubt through mere grammatical inadvertence) has maintained it to presuppose (BJ, II, 210) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

268. ORACLES FROM THE POETS. BY CAROLINE GILMAN.(1)

* 269. TABLE-TALK. BY WILLIAM HAZLITT.

Of the first series of the Table-Talk we spoke so fully in a previous number, that it will be needless to say anything of the second — which is, of course, a continuation. In lieu of any convents from ourselves, therefore, we make a quotation of some length, on a topic of deep interest treated as only Hazlitt could treat it (BJ, II, 217) .

The topic is “capacity and genius“. This is the whole notice; the rest is quotation. [page 665:]

The relation between this and the earlier, the May 3 notice, is, in the light of the conditions in the critical departments at the two periods, definite enough to give both of these notices to Poe without question.

270. HISTORY OF THE WAR IN FRANCE AND BELGIUM IN 1815. BY CAPTAIN W. SIBORNE.

. . . had access . . . to the most authentic sources of information . . . And unmistakable air of candor pervades every page, sad the accuracy of detail suns to be self-demonstrated. The manner is exceedingly good (BJ, II, 212) .

271. HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE SECOND WAR BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN, etc. BY CHARLES J. INGERSOLL.

Force and novelty abound, and we are never permitted to doubt the honesty of the narration, but there is a slight tinge of the Whimsical about the book which may operate, in the first instance, to prevent a very general appreciation of its nerita — which are undoubtedly great . . . his more English, which is loose and uncouth to a very reprehensible degree . . . The whole paragraph is awkward in the extreme. But happily the value of the book does not depend upon such trifles as these (BJ, II, 212) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

272. OLLENDORF’S NEW METHOD OF LEARNING . . . THE GERMAN LANGUAGE. BY J. G. ADLER.

His great merit is that he does not plunge in media res . . . He presupposes no knowledge on the part of the beginner . . . speak feelingly on this subject; for we have felt the thousand difficulties and ambiguities of other grammars, which have been written by good Germanists, certainly, but, at the same time by indifferent metaphysicians. — To instruct, demands a thorough metaphysical education (BJ, II, 212-3) .

273. NORMAN’S NEW-ORLEANS AND ENVIRONS, etc.

We give the full title to show the design of the work; which is all that it professes to be — and a little more (BJ, II, 213) .

274. THE PRINCE AND THE PEDLAR. BY MISS ALLEN PICKERING.

Miss Pickering has written some of the most praiseworthy and popular novels of the day (BJ, II, 213) . [page 666:]

In the September 20 notice of her Agnes Serle Poe wrote: “Few novelists have been more really popular than Miss Pickering” (BJ, II, 167) .

* 275. THE MODERN STANDARD DRAMA. EDITED BY EPES SARGENT.

In the Journal for November 29, Poe noticed this work again: “Ne are glad of the opportunity again to call attention to this series” (BJ, II, 322) . Here, in the October notice, his opinion is

We have seen nothing of the kind so good . . . The editor’s well-known tast [[taste]], especially in dramatic matters, should answer for the fidelity and success of his labors (BJ, II, 213) .

These two notices are clearly from the same hand. By November Poe was sole editor. Again the relation between the two notices in the light of the situation in the critical department is restrictive enough to give both to Poe with an asterisk.

276. THE KNICKERBOCKER FOR OCTOBER.

. . . we are too Much pressed for space to do more, just now, than recommend to the especial attention of our readers the papet (sic) entitled ‘Who are our National Poets’ (BJ, II, 213) .

(?) 277. THE WESTMINSTER REVIEW FOR SEPTEMBER.

278. THE SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER FOR OCTOBER.

contains a very condemnatory and in our opinion a very just review of ‘Poems by William W. Lord’ (BJ, II, 213) .

(?) 279. THE DEMOCRATIC REVIEW FOR OCTOBER.

* 280. SONGS OF OUR LAND AND OTHER POEMS. BY MARY E. HEWITT.

To Mrs. Hewitt’s beautiful book, in especial, we shall attend very particularly in our next (BJ, II, 213) .

The trip to Boston prevented Poe’s doing the notice for the next number; it appeared, however, in the paper for October 25. As it is [page 667:] is definitely his, so is this.

* 281. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Poe quotes from the Mirror a piece, “Poe-lemical” on himself; he proceeds then, to refute it and “do it up” in general. Of the many conclusive references One will be sufficient:

We are not preparing, to publish our Tales in England . . . We should call the book ‘The Gold-Bug and Other Tales’ . . . (BJ, II, 216-7) .

Signed “P” in Whitman copy, with marginal lineations.

OCTOBER 18, 1845.

There appears an announcement at the head of the Critical Notices for this week:

The editor’s temporary absence from the city, will account to our publishing friends for present neglect of several new works. These will be attended to on his return (BJ, II, 227) .

What seems actually to have harpened in the critical department this week is suggested by a study of the notices.

* 282. BIG ABEL AND LITTLE MANHATTAN. BY CORNELIUS MATHEWS.

In our notice of this work, a week or two since, we promised a quotation, by way of instancing the author’s very peculiar style and tone. We proceed now to redeem our word . . . These passages are, perhaps, as idiosincratic (sic) as any in the volume (BJ, II, 227) .

I am forced to accept the “our” as Poe speaking and, on the evidence afforded by the review to which it refers, to give this notice to Poe with an asterisk. Poe’s absence was occasioned by the engagement to recite a poem before the Boston Lyceum on Thursday, October 16. He would have left New York by Tuesday, certainly by Wednesday. The paper should have been nearly ready for the press by Wednesday, for it was issued, supposedly at least, on Saturday. However all that may be, Poe apparently did [page 668:] not have time to prepare the usual editorial matter. His first step in making the best of the situation was a very practical one. Under the guise of a notice and of fulfilling a promise made earlier, he filled a column or too with extracts from Mathew’s book. The writing of this notice would not have consumed five minutes.

SELECTIONS FROM THE WORKS OF TAYLOR, LATIMER, HALL, MILTON, BARROW, SOUTH, BROWN, FULLER, AND BACON. BY BASIL MONTAGU.

This notice, I am convinced, is not Poe’s. It will speak for itself:

This is a book we may safely take on our faith in the good taste and discretion of the American editor. He has been a diligent laborer in the vineyard of old English Literature for many years; and we have no doubt he has a sincere pleasure in seeing the public coming round to the manlier standard of the earlier writers. — They are from the picked greatness of English prose; the beauty, the vigor, the spirit and breadth of the old giant-race of authors, who were men and wrote for men. They have no fear, but a full faith in the generous fecundity of nature, and team on every hand with expression and truth and life . . . At some other day, when our pages are less crowded, it will give us pleasure to spread some of these choice selections before our readers — if they are not before us by resort to the publishers, and a mastery of the whole feast in advance of our grudging convenience (BJ, II, 227-28) .

The next, apparently from the same pen, seems to me just as clearly not Poe’s.

PRAISE AND PRINCIPLE. (?)

If we say that this book is evidently written by sensible, discreet, judicious woman, ere indicate all its best properties as well as though we dwelt on it through a dozen pages . . . It indicates in various passages a greater knowledge of life, in its actual out-of-door struggles, then generally fills to those who can write with such lady-like propriety and refinement . . . Constant purchasers as such books are likely to command, and a few copyrights like this, well deposited in the hands of liberal publishers, should be an estate for the gentle worne (sic) (BJ, II, 228) . [page 669:]

Poe dismissed this book with a sentence in the August 2 number; it seems very unlikely that he should come back to it. My guess would be that on, his departure Poe left behind two or three notices, either made up quickly or already on hand, left-overs from some earlier number; and that he asked someone, probably Watson, to do enough more to fill up space.

(?) 283. LITTELL’S LIVING AGE. NO. 73.

. . . published in Boston . . . provincial preferences . . . is singular example of this occurs in the present number, where an unfavorable notice of e New York author is picked out of many favorable ones, and a favorable notice of a New England historian is picked out of many unfavorable ones (BJ, II, 227) .

This notice may be Poe’s. The attitude is his, but the style has not enough distinction to afford basis for a positive decision.

284. WILEY AND PUTNAM’S ‘FOREIGN LIBRARY‘.

. . . it will include the leading, classic works of the Foreign languages, both ancient and modern — the latter being a new and important feature of the undertaking — with such works of miscellaneous literature as may be worthy of a permanent place in the Library. The first numbers will be Bensenerto (sic) Cellini’s Memoir . . . which Horace Walpole pronounced ‘more amusing than any novel (sic) . . . We shall have more to say of the plan and the books hereafter (BJ, II, 228) .

In the Journal for November 1, Poe, reviewing the Memoirs wrote:

Horace Walpole has done, indeed, but feeble justice to these Memoirs, in calling them ‘more amusing than any novel’ he knew (BJ, II, 257) .

I feel fairly sure that Poe is the author of this notice.

THE DRAMA.

EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

These two articles may be considered together, for both are from one pen. The latter has: [page 670:]

We have called attention under the Dramatic head, to the appearance of Mr. MURDOCH at the Park Theatre, next week (BJ, II, 232) .

These two, I think, are Watson’s. The tone seems to me identical with that of his musical criticisms. Together the two columns fill a scant column and a half. After a paragraph on the increased interest in poetry, rich ends:

. . . so that the opinion are have long entertained that poetry was destined to life its fair front, next in America, in new and attractive forms, will not be defeated by the absence of popular sympathy or a want of a disposition on the part of our publishers to further its approaches towards the public (BJ, II, 232) .

The writer of the “Editorial Miscellany” finds that he has still a quarter of a column to fill. Having nothing else to say, he goes back to the subject he discussed under “Drama“. He concludes:

We are not sure but that the first form in which our Literature is to triumphantly(1) vindicate itself will be that of dramatic writing. There will be and has been exceptions, in single productions in other departments: But we are not sure that the first school to rise will not be the dramatic (BJ, II, 232) .

He had written in the “Drama” column:

We look for the prosperity of the drama here, at home. The hope of the drama is as great — greater according to our notion — here in New York and in America than anywhere on the face of the globe; and are venture to predict that a school of dramatic writing, and a succession of performers, eminently national, having the color of the climate and the heart of the people in them, will are long appear. We look toward the drama, therefore, as a four in which the national spirit shall early shorn itself, with great anxiety. We are determined to watch its promise, and to give it every aid in our power (BJ, II, 232) .

The necessity to fill space ntiy at times, have driven Poe to frivolity or petulancy, but never to a wandering inanity. [page 671:]

OCTOBER 25, 1845.

With this number Poe became sole editor and proprietor. Even stronger becomes the external evidence suggesting, in the absence of contradictory evidence, that Poe is the author of all the notices; to be a little cautious, however, I shall continue with the method adopted at the beginning of this volume.

* 285. THE SONGS OF OUR LAND AND OTHER POEMS. BY MARY L. (sic) HEWITT.

On November 10 Mrs. Hewitt wrote Poe:

Permit me to tell you how much your vary, very kind and encouraging notice of my volume gratified me. The Broadway Journal was the Seylla and Charybdis of my fear, and its editor’s criticism more to be dreaded than that of fifty Blackwoods. Judge then of the measure and quality of my delight on finding that I had parsed the strait in safety.(1)

In February, 1840, Poe published in Godey’s a review of this book of verse. Is we have seen him do before, he rewrote and elaborated the Journal notice. The first paragraph is a sentence by sentence paraphrase; the next four are new; the fifth is as paraphrase, as is the sixth. The rest is now material. The “Literati” article, October, 1846, presents the sane point of view and quotes one bit from the Journal notice: H, XV, 128, 11.10-12, from XII, 255, 11.8-10.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

(?) 286. MORSE’S COREGRAPHIC MAPS.

(?) 287. THE VISION: OR HELL, PERGATORY [[PURGATORY]] AND PARADISE OF DANTE ALIGHIERI. TRANSLATED BY REV. HENRY FRANCIS CARY.

* 288. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

This department, occupying only a half column opens with:

With this number, it will be seen, that we assume the sole control (proprietary as well as editorial) of the ‘Broadway Journal‘. May we hope for the support of our friends? (BJ, II, 248) . [page 672:]

NOVEMBER 1, 1845.

* 289. ALICE RAY. BY MRS. SARAH JOSEPHA HALE.

On October 26, 1845, Poe wrote Mrs. Hale:

. . . may I beg you, therefore to pardon my seeming discourtesy in not sooner thanking you for your sweet poem . . .(1)

No poem of Mrs. Hale is printed in the Journal say time near this date; the reference, then, must be to Alice Ray. The review itself clearly indicates Poe:

The poem is truly beautiful. Its delicacy and fancy of conception, and the truthful simplicity and grace of its manner, have, we confess, quite taken us by surprise . . . The story has a marked originally in it, and is well adapted to poetic effect — but the main excellence of the work lies in its point and force of expression — in the aggregate of its quotable passages(2) . . . Throughout is manifested an exquisite sense of the forcible and of the delicate in rhythm. Upon the whole, this poem cannot fail to elevate its author very highly in the opinion of all those whose opinion she would be likely to value (BJ, II, 256-7) .

Signed “P” in Whitman copy.

290. MEMOIRS OF BENEVENUTO (sic) CELLINI. TRANSLATED BY THOMAS ROSCOE.

All men of letters agree that the Autobiography of Cellini is one of the most interest books ever written. It could not fail to be so — Cellini having been what he was, and having seen what he saw . . . He felt keenly — in fact his excessive sensibility amounted to madness . . . (BJ, II, 257) .

291. I PROMESSI SPOSI.

We are pleased to see the word ‘Melange‘, as a general title, supplanted by the more sober ‘Miscellany‘. We should speak English in all cases where there is no sufficient reason for speaking anything else (BJ, II, 257) . [page 673:]

(?) 292. MEMOIRS OF AN AMERICAN LADY. BY MRS. GRANT.

293. THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ALFIERE. TRANSLATED BY C. EDWARDS LESTER.

The character of Alfieri, with more of passion and more of fierte, resembled very remarkably that of Benevenuto (sic) Cellini. His impulsiveness not less than his genius made him what he was — a great man. His ‘mission’ (to use a cant term) . . . (BJ, II, 258) .

294. LIGHTS AND SHADOWS OF SCOTTISH LIFE. BY PROFESSOR WILSON.

This is the best work of its author — and, in its peculiar way, unsurpassed (BJ, II, 258) .

295. THE MYSTERIES OF TOBACCO. BY REV. BENJAMIN J. LANE.

An unanswerable exposition of the evils of Tobacco — but do these manifest evils really need an exposition? (BJ, II, 258) .

(?) 290. LOVE AND MATRIMONY.

291. HARPER’S ILLUMINATED AND NEW PICTORIAL BIBLE. NO. 41.

298. THE WANDERING JEW.

. . . the designs are a treasure. It is difficult to conceive anything more bold — striking original (BJ, II, 258) .

(?) 299. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. BY MARCIUS WILSON.

(?) 300. HARPER’ S ILLUMINATED AND ILLUSTRATED SHAKSPEARE.

(?) 301. SIMMS’ MAGAZINE FOR OCTOBER.

(?) 302. GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE FOR OCTOBER.

(?) 303. GODEY’S LADY’S BOOK FOR NOVEMBER.

(?) 304. ARTHUR’S MAGAZINE FOR NOVEMBER .

305. THE COLUMBIAN MAGAZINE FOR NOVEMBER.

Her style is notes? for accuracy, purity, and freedom from superfluity (BJ, II, 258) .

This of Mrs. Hale.

306. BLACKWOOD, FOR OCTOBER.

Its papers are even unusually pungent (BJ, II, 258) . [page 674:]

* 307. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

This department teems with revelations of Poe as the author. A goodly section of it recounts his Boston experience and the reading of “Al Aaraaf”; he quotes a passage from a Louisiana paper about “Poe the poet” which sadly puzzles him: “one thing is certain: — we never made a ‘resolution’ in our lives” (BJ, II, 262) ; he quotes from a British review of his Tales and answers:

The only objection to this theory is that we never go into the woods (for fear of owls) and are quite sure that we never saw a live Indian in our lives (BJ, II, 4263) ;(1)

he assumes responsibility for some errata in last week’s paper; and on the last page one finds: “. . . (including ‘Al Aaraaf‘, the one with which we quizzed the Bostonians) . . .” (BJ, II, 264) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

NOVEMBER 8, 1845.

308. THE ARTIST, THE MERCHANT, AND THE STATESMAN OF THE AGE OF THE MEDICI AND OF OUR OWN TIMES. BY C. EDWARDS LESTER.

We have been much interested in this volume, and shall take occasion to speak of it fully hereafter . . . (BJ, II, 274) .

For this second volume of the Journal Poe was not very scrupulous about keeping such promises for a later full review. Here, however, he does. A long review appeared in the next number.

309. A COMPLETE SYSTEM OF LATIN PROSODY. BY PATRICK S. CASSERLY.

Its comprehensiveness is especially notable; but the author is sadly in error, we thank, in supposing that Latin Prosody, any more than Latin Syntax, can best be studied in Latin Rules (BJ, II, 274) . [page 675:]

310. THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD. BY OLIVER GOLDSMITH.

It is very full in the way of annotations (BJ, II, 274) .

(?) 311. LAYS FOR THE SABBATH. BY EMILY TAYLOR.

(?) 312. ELEMENTS OF GEOLOGY. BY W. S. W. RUSCHENBERGER.

(?) 313. THIS HISTORY OF AN OFFICER’S WIDOW AND HER YOUNG FAMILY. BY MRS. HOFFLAND.

314. THE AUTHOR’S DAUGHTER. BY MARY HOWITT.

It is written as Mary Howitt invariably writes — well (BJ, II, 275) .

(?) 315. THE HISTORY OF ST. GILES AND ST. JAMES. BY DOUGLAS JERROLD.

* 316. THE WAVERLY NOVELS. BY SIR WALTER SCOTT.

We have repeatedly called attention to the marvellous cheapness of this edition (BJ, II, 276) .

In the Journal of August 2 Poe announced the appearance of this series without any comment on it.(1) He noticed an issue of the series in the Journal, of Aril 26.(2) This tie-up constitutes, to my mind, conclusive evidence.

317. RE-PUBLICATION OF THE LONDON LANCET.

. . . the most authoritative medical serial in existence (BJ, II, 275) .

In a notice of this magazine in the April 5 Journal Poe declared it to embody “the most authentic and valuable medical and surgical information to be found, periodically, in any work in the world” (BJ, I, 210) .

318. MEMOIRS OF BENVENUTO CELLINI. TRANSLATED BY ROSCO. V. II.

. . . one of the most interesting biographies ever written (BJ, II, 275) .

The week before Poe wrote of this work: “one of the most interesting [page 676:] works ever written” (BJ, II, 257) .

* 319. HUNT’S MERCHANTS’ (sic) MAGAZINE FOR NOVEMBER.

Of the editor of ‘The Merchant’s Magazine’ we have more than once expressed our opinion that he is one of the most remarkable men of his day; and we have now lying by us an articles from the pen of Willis which speaks very much to the same purpose. There is not one of our readers who will not forgive us for quoting it . . . (BJ, II, 275) .

The Willis article appeared in the Evening Mirror of November 13, 1844, while Poe was on the Mirror staff. Again here is circumstantial evidence which seems to me conclusive.

320. THE ARISTIDEAN FOR OCTOBER.

. . . is even unusually rich — containing some of the most forcible Magazine papers we have ever (sic) seen . . . a queer article on ‘American Poets’ (BJ, II, 276) .

(?) 321. THE AMERICAN REVIEW FOR NOVEMBER.

322. THE KNICKERBOCKER MAGAZINE FOR NOVEMBER.

is really beneath notice and beneath contempt. And yet this work was, at one time, respectable. We should regret, for the sake of New York literature, that a journal of this kind should perish, and through sheer imbecility on the part of its conductors (BJ, II, 276) .

* 323. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

There is no direct evidence here; a sentence or two, however, will be sufficiently suggestive:

Nearly every paper which comes to us has same cavil at American books, while the least particle of pretence is nourished and hugged and lionized, if it only come from some foreign Timothy Twiddle-thought. It would be amusing were it not contemptible . . . This is all nonsense — as usual with the ‘Express‘. No man is freer from Tennysonism, or any other ‘ism’ than Wallace. We presume the Express alludes to ‘mere‘, the common property of mankind (BJ, II, 278-9) . [page 677:]

It is quite safe to give this to Poe definitely; he is sole editor.

NOVEMBER 15, 1845.

324. THE ARTIST, THE MERCHANT AND THE STATESMAN. BY C. EDWARDS LESTER.

In the last issue Poe promised to “speak of it fully hereafter“. For corroboration a few sentences will serve.

The general arrangement and spirit of the book are extremely creditable to Mr. Lester, although there are certain defects and blemishes, which we regret to find marring the volume. One of these is the inharmonious and inartistical union, in the same volume, of two subjects with so little to connect thcm . . . To the style of the work . . . We might take some exception, in an extreme colloquialism, which, although not offensive in the eagerness of a first reading, will injure it as a permanent record . . . On the whole, we are pleased with this work, in the part we have given our attention to, (of the other portion of it we may speak at length hereafter) and believe it will be of service in its province (BJ, II, 287) .

I have no doubt that this is Poe’s.

SPECIMENS OF ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS. BY CHARLES LAMB.

The critic of this anthology, I am convinced, is not Poe; he has something of the attitude and general plans of reference of the author of the October 18 “Montagu’s Selections“. Circumstances there suggested Watson; here there is nothing to hint at an identity.

He sets out with a speculation. If with the first settlement of America “the Cheap Era in Literature had began (sic) ” and if Lamb’s book had been thrown off from the printing presses

a thousand sheets per hour, and steamboats and railroads been ready to blaze its issues through the country . . . the whole face of its Literature would, according to all ordinary modes of calculation, have been changed, and would now present the aspect of a Jupiter rather than an Adonis . . . We have tinkled in the minor key, jingling our ten feet and [page 678:] keeping close to our regular measures with the painful pertinacity of the droning minstrel of the streets . . . assuaging and nullifying even in our copies of these better spirits, strength and manhood and manly earnestness down to a poor piping treble (BJ, II, 286) .

He rhapsodizes then on the “old” poets:

They speak the sorrow and the belief, the joy and the agitation of their times, like men. They dip their pens in the very life-blood of humanity, and write so as to stir the lifeblood . . . These genuine words of theirs cutting their way through all of war, and darkness and discordant history that stands between, reach the present day, and with a vital fire come home to our hearts . . . (BJ, I1, 287) .

He concludes:

We repine, we confess, at the taking down of this book from our shelf, (it has been the dear companion of many joyful years,) and leading it out into the market place. But as we hope for many sharers, through it, in our old and longtime enthusiasm for the Elders — we admit that our fell-grief be made common, and that all mankind be let in to ‘joy in our joy, and sadden in our sadness’ (BJ, II, 289) .

325. MEMOIRS OF BENVIOUTO CELLINI. TRANSLATED BY THOMAS ROSCOE. V. II.

We made but scant mention last week of this interesting work (BJ, II, 289) .

Poe — for this sentence links this notice with the two of the two preceding weeks — then quotes a review from the Evening Post.

326. THE DRAMA.

Although this article is largely concerned with the acting of Murdoch, there is a paragraph on the state of drama which brings it into our realm. One sentence, in especial, points to Poe:

Among its earliest indications was the reception of the new comedy ‘Fashion’ (to which we cannot altogether give our critical approval . . .) . . . (BJ, II, 290) . [page 679:]

* 327. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Aside from the fact, conclusive here in itself, that Poe is the Broadway Journal, there is no external evidence here. One passage, however, is particularly suggestive of Poe:

If a dirty fellow will brush against a gentleman, the gentleman will be mistaken for a dirty fellow, and in this way vulgar and malevolent critics vilify pure authors. Just censure is one thing, and this wholesale abuse is another. It is very possible that a practiced knight of the quill might prick Dr. Cheever gracefully, and the public might be gratified at the spectacle, for the public loves to see an author tickled; but the public requires this spiriting, to be done ‘gently“, and has no affection for the weapon of fish-women or scavengers, clerical or otherwise (BJ, II, 292) .

NOVEMBER 22, 1845.

We have again to apologise to our publishing friends for the brevity of our Critical Notices, . In our next number, we shall devote more than usual attention to this Department . . . For the present (owing to the bustle consequent upon removing our office) we must content ourselves with a mere announcement of the books on hand for notice (BJ, II, 307) .

* 328. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Poe opens this column by quoting a piece called “Poe’s Poetry” from the Southern Patriot. He proceeds then to a retelling of the Boston affair, concluding with his ungentlemanly crack about Mrs. Walters’ wig.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with marginal lineations.

NOVEMBER 29, 1845.

* 329. WESTERN CLEARINGS. BY MRS. C. M. KIRKLAND.

The “Literati” sketch of Mrs. Kirkland, August, 1846, is nothing; but a rewriting of this review. Only the last paragraphs of the later article are independent. Of the first half [page 680:] of the “Literati” sketch, one half reproduces the Journal review verbatim, save for occasional stylistic changes; the other half retains, for the most part the words of the earlier review, shifting frequently the word order, omitting in the process three sentences.(1)

* 330. AMERICA AND THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. BY FREDERICK VON RAUMER. TRANSLATED BY WILLIAM W. TURNER..

Internal evidence here is strong:

Its commendable features are candor, evident desire for truth, freedom from prejudice, comprehensiveness, and masterly breadth of generalization . . . Were we to say, in round terms, that Professor von Raumer has set forth with accuracy not one fact in relation to American letters, we fear that we should not be very far from the truth . . . Of the ‘propriety’ we are not prepared to speak — and the ‘dignity’ will do — but the ‘moderation’ (so far at least: as concerns the Down-Last Review) must have reference to the applause or attention bestowed upon these insignificant individuals who have the misfortune to reside out of the limits of Massachusetts . . . He is not in condition to consider or to comprehend the innumerable petty arts by which, in America, a dexterous quack(2) may force even the most contemptible work into notoriety and circulation (BJ, II, 321) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy, with. marginal lineations.

331. THE PHILOSOPHY OF MYSTERY. BY WALTER COOPER DENDY.

. . . an exceedingly able book — far better, we think, than the ‘Natural Magic’ of Brewster — a book of identical purpose carried out in a totally different way. The ‘Natural Magic’ is the more ratiocinative — Mr. Dendy’s essay the more poetical, the more imaginative, and to us the more interesting(3) (BJ, II, 321) . [page 681:]

332. THE RHINE, BY VICTOR HUGO.

The style of this ‘Tour’ is particularly French — there is no other word for the idea. We find a great deal of point, vivacity, wit, humor, archness, novelty — the whole pervaded and ‘toned down’ by a delicious simplicity . . . His ‘Notre Dame’ is a work of high genius controlled by consummate art (BJ, II, 321) .

333. THE LIFE OF CONDE. BY LORD MAHCN.

This is also a translation . . . We need scarcely add that the work is of interest — for it concerns ‘The Great Conde‘, and is written by Mahon (BJ, II, 321-2) .

334. TRIPPINGS IN AUTHORLAND. BY FANNY FORRESTER.

Some of her fame is, beyond question, due to the kindly and frequent notices of Mr. Willis, but the greater portion of it springs from intrinsic merit . . . She is one of our best Magazinists, the very best in her way — and her way would be admirable in all respects but for a slight taunt (sic) of Willisism. Not that we object to Willisism — in Willis (BJ, II, 382) .

335. THE SONGS AND BALLADS OF GEORGE P. MORRIS.

It is utterly impossible to deny that many of these compositions (sic) have merit of a high order — and, of course, we have no disposition to deny it (BJ, II, 322) .

* 336. THE SYBYL’S (sic) WREATH AND FLORAL EMBLEMS, WITH THE NATAL MOUTHS (sic) .

Some person has had the audacity to send us a book thus entitled, with a slip of paper containing the following words . . . The intention, of course, is that we shall adopt this opinion as editorial — as our own. We have no such opinion. The book is contemptible at all points . . . the detestable vulgarity . . . (BJ, II, 322) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

* 337. POEMS. BY ALFRED TENNYSON.

. . . a poet, who (in our own humble, but sincere opinion,) is the greatest that ever lived. We are perfectly willing to undergo all the censure which so heretical an opinion may draw down upon us (BJ, II, 322) . [page 682:]

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

* 338. POEMS OF MANY YEARS. BY RICHARD MONCKTON MILNES.

This is also a new edition of a poet much and justly admits in England — and insufficiently appreciated by ourselves. Re may allude to the volume hereafter (BJ, II, 322) .

The reference to the Tennyson notice warrants the giving of this to Poe with an asterisk.

339. AMERICANISM. BY CORNELIUS MATHEWS.

An excellent address, to which we shall refer more fully next week, and from which we shall take the liberty of making some extracts. (BJ, II, 322) .

Poe did not refer to this notice later, but in the “Editorial Miscellany” of this week, he prints a criticism on it from the Mirror and comments:

Whatever, in the opinion of the worshipper of Britain end everything British, may be objectionable in the matter of Mr. Mathews’ address, its manner, at least, is simple and unaffected, and we are quite at a loss to discover anything incomprehensible in any portion of the essay (BJ, II, 325) .

340. NARRATIVE OF THE EXPLORING EXPEDITION TO TEE ROCKY MOUNTAINS, etc. BY BREVET CAPTAIN J. C. FREMONT.

We scarcely know what to say of this narrative — so as to recommend it with sufficient positiveness to our readers . . . ‘Robinson Crusoe’ is not better as a composition, and here we have the additional charm of truth — a truth that cannot be doubted, and which the tone of narration assures us, is not exaggerated in any degree (BJ, II, 322) .

341. HARPER’ S ILLUM1NATED AND PICTORIAL BIBLE. NO. 43.

342. THE WANDERING JEW.

“Its designs are beyond praise” (BJ, II, 322) . So wrote Poe also of the same work in a November 1 notice, from which we [page 683:] have quoted.(1)

* 343. THE MODERN STANDARD DRAMA. EDITED BY EPES SARGENT.

For proof that this is Poe’s, see this chapter, page ???.

344. THE COLUMBIAN MAGAZINE FOR DECEMBER.

Mrs. Osgood is here again termed “graceful” (BJ, II, 322) . Poe’s “propensity to ring the change upon the word ‘grace‘” in speaking of Mrs. Osgood has been many times pointed out.

345. THE ARISTIDEAN FOR OCTOBER.

is unusually rich in good things (BJ, II, 323) .

In the November 8 Journal Poe began his notice: “The Aristidean for October, is even unusually rich . . .“ (BJ, II, 276) . He quotes here from a poem of A. M. Ide, Jr., which is “exquisitely versified and has some Passages of a high order of poetic excellence” (BJ, II, 323) .

* 346. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

The column begins:

The FROG-POND seems to be dried up — and the Frogs are, beyond doubt, all dead — as we hear no more croaking from that quarter (BJ, II, 325) .

If farther evidence is needed, it is supplied by the first sentence in the fourth and last paragraph:

We do not intend to claim the honor of originating in the Journal the exquisite poem, by Halleck, now published (BJ, II, 325-6) .

DECEMBER 6, 1845.

THE LIFE OF FREDERICK SCHILLI R. BY THOMAS CARLYLE.

Longer than most of these latter-day reviews, this one, I believe, is not Poe’s; there is here more of rhetoric, balanced [page 684:] phrase-making than one finds in Poe’s critiques; for example:

We rejoice that it was completed before the simplicity of his spirit (Carlyle’s) had been inverted and corrupted by caprice; before the Fountain of Beauty in his soul had been turned into a turbid vortex; before he appeared a foreign and portentious (sic) shape to his century not to purify — but to bewilder and mislead it . . . We can trace here the growth of his faculties (Schiller’s) and his progress amidst the struggles and obstacles of his early career; from the time when his ’strong, untutored spirit’ consumed by its own activity, was chafing blindly, like ocean waves, against barriers that restrained it — through difficulties and vexations which only his burning energy of soul enabled him to overcome — up to that calm, intellectual elevation, in the lucid expansion of which he could watch the workings of his imagination, and subject the operations of genius to tho requisitions of taste (BJ, II, 336-7) .

This, obviously, is unlike Poe’s usual critical style. These sentences are not typical of the review as a whole. The following quotations are, and they are more like Poe:

We cannot help thinking it the most delightful of all tho writings of Carlyle. It was written before he had adopted the eccentricities and affectations of style, which have obscured so many fine thoughts. . . . The translations from the tragedies of Schiller in this volume are very imperfectly executed. It is evident the translator has no ear for rhythm. The literal meaning is given, but the subtle spirit of poetry is lost in the transition from one language to the other. But in the analysis of the plays, and in the just and discriminating criticisms, the reader may be guided safely and most agreeably (BJ, II, 336-7) .

Nevertheless, there is nothing here strong enough to over-weigh the evidence of the first quoted section.

347. THE LIFE OF LOUIS DE BOURBON, PRINCE OF CONDE. BY LORD MAHON.

In last week’s Journal Poe noticed, or rather announced this work, Nothing in the notice indicates that he had road it. His only actual comment on the book was “We need scarcely add that [page 685:] the work is one of interest . . . ” (BJ, II, 322) . Since then he has examined the book more closely. If the author, he declares,

had indulged in occasional philosophic surveys, or in comments, suggested by the wild and exciting events he records, such as are expected from every historian who aims higher than a more setting forth of facts — we should have found nothing to desire . . . The book is without pretension; we are hurried on, without pause . . . Notwithstanding that something is wanting, however, the work is deeply interesting, and a valuable contribution to historical literature (BJ, II, 337) .

(?) 348. FATHER RIPA’S RESIDENCE AT THE COURT OF PEKING.

(?) 349. THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS, WITH A LIFE OF JOHN BUNYAN. BY ROBERT SOUTHEY.

(?) 350. THE SUFFERINGS OF CHRIST. BY A LAYMAN.

(?) 351. A MANUAL OF PRIVATE DEVOTIONS.

(?) 352. THE WHITEBOY. BY MRS. S. C. HALL.

* 353. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

There is much evidence here; a selection will suffice:

Mr. Thomas H. Lane is the only person (besides ourself) authorized to give receipts or transact business for ‘The Broadway Journal’ (BJ, II, 339) .

Poe flares out again at the Frogpondians, promising, to come again and read a new noun. He prints an attack on him from the ‘Nassau Monthly’ and comments:

The manner in which we are maltreated, of late days, is really awful to behold. Every body is at us — little dogs and all. The littlest of all dogs is perk a^s the ‘Nassau Monthly’ — whatever is the ‘Nassau Monthly’ (BJ, II, 339) .

Signed ‘‘P” in the Whitman copy.

DECEMBER 13, 1845.

* 354. POEM. BY FRANCES S. OSGOOD.

Poe has four articles of some length on Mrs. Osgood. This is the first. Another appeared in Godey’s, March, [page 686:] 1846;(1) another in “Literati“, Godey’s, September, 1846; and one in the Messenger, August, 1849. Each of these is reworked from the former ones, the Messenger combining all three. The relations between these are traced in detail in the Messenger chapter, pages ???-???.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

355. THE HISTORY OF SILK, COTTON, LINEN, WOOL, AND OTHER FIBROUS SUBSTANCES, etc.

We have given the title in full as the most succint [[succinct]] mode of conveying the nature and purpose of the work . . . this able work supplies, in fact, a desideratum whose need has long been felt . . . methodical treatise on fibrous substances (BJ, II, 355) .

356. THE ARTIST, THE MERCHANT, AND THE STATESMAN. BY C. E. LESTER. VOL. 2.

This, the concluding volume of Mr. Lester’s entertaining book, has less unity of purpose, but greater variety of incident and anecdote, than the first (BJ, II, 355) .

Poe reviewed the first volume in two installments — November 8 and 15. There he criticized the book for the lack of unity of purpose.(2)

357. AIDS TO ENGLISH COMPOSITION. BY RICHARD GREEN PARKER.

As this work has acquired, with justice, a very extensive reputation, we feel it necessary merely to give its title and call attention to the issue of a now and carefully revised edition (BJ, II, 355) .

358. STABLE TALK AND TABLE TALK. BY HARRY HIEOV ER.

Who is Harry Hieover? . . . Many of the Chapters are equal to the very best of Harry Lorrequer’s (BJ, II, 355) .

359. A TREATISE ON CORNS, BUNIONS, THE DISEASES OF NAILS, AND THE GENERAL MANAGEMENT OF THE FEET. BY LEWIS DURLACHER.

A treatise which cannot fail to do a great deal of good by . . . (BJ, II, 355) . [page 687:]

360. THE AMBUSCADE. BY THOMPSON WHITNEY.

We have not yet read this volume so thoroughly as to hazard an opinion of its merits. A glance, however, assures us that the author has a commendable contempt for things in general — very especially for reason and for rhyme (BJ, II, 355) .

(?) 361. THE FOSTER BROTHER. EDITED BY LEIGH HUNT.

(?) 362. THE WANDERING JEW. NO. 5.

(?) 363. SERMONS. BY THOMAS ARNOLD.

364. THE DREAM AND OTHER POEMS.

THE CHILD OF THE ISLAND. BY THE HON. MRS. NORTON.

Mrs. Norton is emphatically the poet of passion — even more so then Byron . . . No single poem ever so powerfully, affected us as ‘The Dying Hour’ . . . The effect, however, is in no respect a properly poetical one, and the same sentiments, in prose would have produced an intenser passionate effect (BJ, II, 356) .

(?) 365. THE LIFE OF MOZART. BY EDWARD HOLMES.

366. THE TREASURY OF HISTORY. NO. 11.

A slip of paper accompanied this pamphlet, says Poe:

In the present instance we have no hesitation in adopting the opinion as our own — that is to say, we agree with it — but the practice of sending round such circulars is atrocious (BJ, II, 356) .

* 367. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Poe quotes a notice of his poems from the Brook Farm Phalanx and lashes into the Phalanx con amore. He quotes also a paragraph from the Tribune on the “Facts of M. Valdemar’s Case“, which he answers also in the first person.

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

DECEMBER 20, 1845.

368. BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL NOTICES. BY WILLIAM H. PRESCOTT.

In this notice one finds Poe’s prejudice against the [page 688:] Frogpondians and his great admiration for Brockden Brown.

. . . ‘The North American Review’ — styled by the author, in the preface to the British edition, ‘the most considerable journal in the united States‘. We fear that its consideration, at present, is confined chiefly to the precincts of Faneuil Hall . . . The first of these articles (on Brown) . . . is of unusual interest, conveying a just and forcible picture of one of the most singular and powerful of American intellects. The memoir can scarcely be termed critical, but it abounds in passages evincing the keenest discrimination in respect to the literary position of the author reviewed (BJ, II, 373) .

369. TRIFLES IN VERSE. BY LEWIS J. CIST.

. . . we cannot conceive what could have beguiled Mr. Cist into the perpetration of such absurdity. The collection is so modestly prefaced as to disarm criticism . . . The poems themselves are not particularly imaginative, but evince much purity of taste and fervor of feeling (BJ, II, 373) .

370. THE DIADEM FOR 1846.

. . . a vivid scene from Crabbe — admirable altogether . . . Somewhat rashly taken from . . . the composition of which is so remarkably meritorious. In cutting out portions from such a work, there should have been fresh accessories. What admirable in its due position in a large picture, is very often displeasing when taken by itself, or merely with the points immediately surrounding it. Here is something exceedingly piquant and naive (sic) (BJ, II, 374) .

(?) 371. THE MISSIONARY MEMORIAL.

(?) 372. THE ROSE. EDITED BY EMILY MARSHALL.

* 373. THE MAYFLOWER FOR 1846.

We have twice before noticed ‘The May-flower‘, but, while we are on the subject of Annuals, we cannot refrain from once again calling attention to its merits (BJ, II, 374) .

Poe announced the annual as forthcoming in the “Editorial Miscellany” of August 9;(1) he noticed it briefly in the Journal for September 27.(2) Here is evidence sufficient to allow the inclusion of the [page 689:] notice in the canon with an asterisk.

374. ELINOR WILLYS. BY ANNABEL PENNFEATHER. EDITED BY J. FENIMORE COOPER.

Mr. Cooper in an Editor’s preface, says very seriously . . . The author (real or suppositous [[suppositious]]) says afterwards in her own preface . . . All which only makes it apparent to our mind that Mr. Cooper is both author and editor. The names as well as grammar, throughout, are exceedingly Cooperish — and the dialogue is especially so. The narrative is one of much interest (BJ, II, 374) .

(?) 375. THE BOOK Of CHRISTMAS. BY THOMAS K. HERVEY.

376. FIRST LESSONS IN POLITICAL ECONOMY. BY JOHN M‘VICAR.

FIRST LESSONS IN CHEMISTRY. BY UNCLE DAVY.

The last (by Uncle Davy) may be by Humphrey Davy, or his ghost, for anything that we know to the contrary, but with a fund of accurate chemical information, it contains some unusually loose grammar . . . We will put this sentence (punctuation and all) against anything written by Thomas, Carlyle (BJ, II, 375) .

377. ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF PALESTINE. BY JOHN KITTOR.

. . . well written, succinct and yet sufficiently comprehensive (BJ, II, 375) .

378. LOVE AND MESMERISM. BY HORACE SMITH.

(?) 379. THE WANDERING JEW. NO. 7

(?) 380. HARPER’S ILLUMINATED AND ILLUSTRATED SHAKESPEARE. NOS. 71 and 72.

(?) 381. THE VIGIL OF FAITH AND OTHER POEMS. BY CHARLES FENNO HOFFMAN.

* 382. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Erratum — In speaking, last week, of Mrs. Osgood’s Poems, we used the word anapaestic, when we intended dactylic (BJ, II, 316) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy.

DECEMBER 27, 1845.

383. THE POETICAL WORKS OF PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY. BY G. G. FOSTER.

. . . a poet whom all poets, and whom poets only, ‘appreciate . . . It is, as asserted, a complete edition . . . rather too complete, perhaps many [page 690:] of the Fragments are utterly destitute of intrinsic value . . . The Biographical and Critical Notice by Mr. Foster, is well written, (barring a little justifiable furore) , and evinces a keen discrimination, and, very especially, a thorough appreciation . . . (BJ, II, 385) .

384. THE OPAL. EDITED BY JOHN KEESE.

Through neglect, discourtesy, or something else, on the part of somebody, or perhaps of Nobody — we have received no copy of this year’s Opal, and have no opportunity, therefore, of speaking of it in full (BJ, II, 386) .

385. MISCELLANIES. BY WILLIAM PRESCOTT.

We said a few words, last week, of this admirable collection of essays . . . (BJ, II, 386) .

The Prescott notice of last week ended: “We shall speak again of this volume, next week” (BJ, II, 373) .

* 386. THE POEMS OF ALFRED B. STREET.

Man is, in fact, only incidentally a poetic theme: -we mean the heart and intellect of Man — matters which the pseudo-transcendentalists of Frogpondium are perpetually attempting to force into poetry — with no other object them to impart to their doggerel an air of profundity. Mr. Street’s subjects are invariably poetical ones — but they belong not to the loftiest order. They are descriptive altogether — not sufficiently ideal (BJ, II, 387) .

In “Marginalia“, Democratic Review, April, 1846, Poe wrote:

As a descriptive poet, Mr. Street is to be highly commended . . . We demand creation — (H, XVI, 102) .

In “Autographs“, Graham’s, January, 1842, Poe wrote of Street:

He has made Mr. Bryant his model . . . (GM, XX, 46; H, XV, 254) .

In this Journal notice he has:

Mr. Bryant seems to have bean the model . . . (BJ, II, 387) .

This notice may be given Poe with an asterisk. [page 691:]

387. HYPERION, BY HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW.

The work itself is sufficiently well known. It has all Mr. Longfellow’s distinctiveness of thought and manner — is graceful, scholar-like, at times pointed, and always artistical, but neither original, nor very interesting. Its tone is a palpable imitation of the German spirit. One of its marked peculiarities — and an idiosyncracy, in fact, appertaining to all that the author does — is its entire want of suggestiveness. The book does not go beyond itself. (BJ, II, 387) .

In the Burton’s notice of this work Poe expressed indignation that Longfellow had “been recreant to the good cause“, that he had demurred “at the great labor requisite for the stern demands of high art” (BGM, V, 227; H, X, 40) .

388. THE ALPS AND THE RHINE. BY J. T. HEADLEY.

Parts of this notice have been already quoted in connection with the August 9 review of Headley’s Letters.(1) One more passage may here by noted:

It is not the grammatical construction of the sentence, however, but its philosophy to which we allude. When details fail to convey distinct impressions, it is merely because the details themselves are indistinct (BJ, II, 387) .

389. SKETCHES OF MODERN LITERATURE AND EMINENT LITERARY MEN. BY GEORGE GILFILLAN.

This is in all respects a valuable work — containing some of the most discriminative criticism we have ever read . . . Perhaps the most original and judicious of these sketches is that of Godwin — a very remarkable man, and not yet thoroughly understood (BJ, II, 387) .

(?) 390. A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON HEALTHY SKIN.

391. MONTEZUMA, THE LAST OF THE AZTECS. BY EDWARD MATURIN.

We have not yet had time to read the volume, but a glance assures us that (barring a little Maturinism or Bertramism) they are at least [page 692:] well-written, in the ordinary sense of the phrase. Mr. Maturin, it is understood, is the son of the author of Melmoth — a very powerful book, beyond doubt (BJ, II, 368) .

392. CHANCES AND CHANGES. BY CHARLES BURDETT.

It is in the manner of ‘Chrysal or the Adventures of a Guinea‘, and quite as good a book in every respect (BJ, II, 388) .

393. VOLTAIRE AND ROUSSEAU BY J. AKERLY.

The intention is, beyond doubt, a commendable one — but we cannot help regarding the work as one of supererogation (BJ, II, 388) .

(?) 394. HARPER’S ILLUSTRATED AND NEW PICTORIAL BIBLE. NO. 45.

395. GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE FOR JANUARY.

Lowell has a poem full of nerve and grace . . . We mention in especial, the ‘Proem to the Froissart Ballads’ — although this is strongly tinctured with imitation. For example . . . (BJ, II, 388) .

396. HUNT’S MERCHANT’S MAGAZINE FOR DECEMBER.

. . . the most decidedly useful of American Magazines . . . (BJ, II, 388) .

(?) 397. THE COLUMBIAN MAGAZINE FOR JANUARY.

* 398. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Poe quotes a letter “written to us in reference to the extraordinary Case of M. Ualdemar‘; the letter is addressed: “Edgar A. Poe, Esq. New York” W.11.390) .

Signed “P” in the Whitman copy with marginal lineations and notes, one of the latter being in Mrs. Whitman’s hand.

JANUARY 3, 1846.

399. LETTERS AND SPEECHES OF OLIVER CROMWELL. BY THOMAS CARLYLE.

A most valuable work this is — from the intrinsic merit of the letters and speeches it contains, and not from the rhapsodical, really run-mad comments of Carlyle . . . We arrays esteemed Cromwell the more for the [page 693:] manner in which he routed that scum of hypocritical rascals, the Rump Parliament. It is a pity for his memory that a man like Carlyle should have engaged in the edition of his letters and speeches (BJ, II, 404) .

400. THE PILGRIM IN THE SHADOW OF THE JUNGFRAU. BY GEO. B. CHEEVER.

Dr. Cheever dedicates his ‘book to Richard H. Dens, whom he calls in the dedication, ‘the poet of “Daybreak“’ — why, we cannot for our life conceive. The book itself is Cheeverish — it we may coin a phrase — in extreme (BJ, II, 404) .

401. THE LADY OF MILAN. EDITED BY MRS. THOMSON.

A work abounding with stirring incidents and some force. The characters are well made out (BJ, II, 404) .

402. BLACKWOOD’S EDINBURGH MAGAZINE FOR DECEMBER.

The papers are remarkably dull, and the poetry especially bad (BJ, II, 404) .

405. HARPER’S ILLUMINATED BIBLE. NO. 46.

We have already exhausted words of commendation in noticing this really standard and elegant work (BJ, II, 404) .

404. THE ARISTIDEAN FOR DECEMBER.

. . . some especially bold and racy articles . . . There is a queer paper-which contains some piquant satire. The article on ‘American Poetry‘, is very biting, but, unfortunately, very true . . . The book notices are spirited independent . . . It is, unquestionably, very original in conception and execution (BJ, II, 404-5) .

* 405. EDITORIAL MISCELLANY.

Poe’s signed valedictory is printed in this short column.

 


[[Footnotes]]

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 627:]

1.  Quoted in Drake’s Catalogue of First Editions and Rare Books, No. 240, 1935.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 628:]

1.  Poe-Anthon, New York, June, 1844. Gr. MSS. Phot. in UVL.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 633:]

1.  Chivers-Poe, Oaky Grove, September 9, 1845, Huntington MSS. Phot. in UVL.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 634:]

1.  Note the imprecise usage.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 635:]

1.  i.e. Wiley and Putnam’s Library of Choice Reading.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 636:]

1.  Thomas-Poe, September 29, 1845. Gr. MSS. Phot in UVL.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 637:]

1.  “. . . the borderland between the Fancy and the Fantasy“.

2.  Of which this novel is the first number.

3.  The subtitle of this novel.

4.  The translator.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 638:]

1.  See GM, XVIII, 199; H, X, 122-4; and GM, XIX, 142-3; H, X, 200-01.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 641:]

1.  Lowell-Briggs, August 21, 1845. Harvard MSS. Phot. in UVL.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 642:]

1.  So Poe referred to Willis in “Doings of Gotham“. See Spannuth and Mabbott (ads.) , ova. cit., p. 67.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 643:]

1.  The article is “The American Drama“, American Review, August, 1845.

2.  The commentary is in an installment of “Marginalia“. Harrison reprints without the dash. See H, XVI, 65.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 645:]

1.  See page ???.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 646:]

1.  See page ???.

2.  “The Haunted House“.

3.  See page 71 of the Journal.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 648:]

1.  See the Graham’s September, 1841, review of Joseph Rushbrook; and the Evening Mirror notice of Settlers of Canada, November 19, 1844.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 649:]

1.  A phrase used in the quotation from the Review.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 653:]

1.  Note the similarity between this attitude and that expressed in the review of Hazlitt’s Characters. See page ???.

2.  See page ???.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 655:]

1.  For quotations from these notices, see the Burton’s chapter, pages ???.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 656:]

1.  Campbell, K., “The Bibliography of Poe“, MLN, XXXII, p. 270.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 657:]

1.  Poe-Griswold, (Jan, or Feb., 1849) , In H, XVII, 32.

2.  In the Godey’s review one finds: “The narrative (if such it can be termed) opens with . . .” (GLB, ???,??? ; H, XIII, 74) .

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 658:]

1.  In the Journal review one binds: “The suggestive parallel between the savage and the, civilized condition” (BJ, II, 173) .

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 659:]

1.  See BJ, II, 78.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 664:]

1.  Nearly all of this notice is quoted in the chapter on the Evening Mirror, page ???. It is Poe’s, I think.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 669:]

1.  Note the form of the construction.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 670:]

1.  Note the split infinitive.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 671:]

1.  Poe can never be accused of an atrocity such as this.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 672:]

1.  Poe-Mrs. Hale, New York, October 26, 1845. Printed in N. Y. Times, January 28, 1917, Typescript in UVL.

2.  This phrase Poe used in the Graham’s, April, 1846, and the Messenger, September, 1848, reviews of Mrs. Lewis.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 674:]

1.  In the Journal for January 25, Briggs, reviewing Schoolcraft’s Oneota, claimed to have first seen Schoolcraft in a group of Indians (BJ, I, 61) . Poe’s statement here corroborates the belief that Briggs is the author of “Oneota”; because of the circumstances surrounding Poe’s statement, however, it is perhaps not wise to make use of it as conclusive evidence.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 675:]

1.  See BJ, II, 57.

2.  See BJ, I, 267-8.

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 680:]

1.  See GLB, XXXIII, 75-6; H, XV, 84-8.

2.  In reference to Griswold’s Poets and Poetry.

3.  As early as December, 1835, Poe shows familiarity with Brewster’s Natural Magic. See SLM, II, 65; H, VIII, 93) .

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 681:]

1.  These notices contained largely in notices of periodicals, appeared in the Mirror during Poe’s connection with it.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 683:]

1.  See page ??? of this section: “the designs are a treasure“.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 686:]

1.  See page ??? of this section.

2.  ???

[The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page 688:]

l. See BJ, II, 78.

2.  See BJ, II, 179.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 690:]

1.  The UVL lacks this volume of DR.

[The following footnote appears at the bottom of page 691:]

1.  See page ??? of this section.


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[S:0 - CCWEAP, 1941] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Articles - A Canon of the Critical Works of EAP (W. D. Hull) (Part V, Chapter II)