Text: various, “Addendum,” for The Poe Log (1987)


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ADDENDUM

1809-1849

The following addendum represent only what might be considered significant additions and corrections to the main entries in The Poe Log. They have been culled from various sources and provided or suggested by various people. In general, these sources and people will be credited in each specific entry.


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[1835] 3 OCTOBER. NEW YORK. The New-York Mirror puffs Theodore S. Fay’s Norman Leslie a fourth time by quoting a passage from the novel. [The puff noted in the issue of 10 October is actually the fifth selection from the novel to be printed in the Mirror. Moss, in Poe’s Literary Battles also fails to cite the 3 October item.]

[1835] 7 OCTOBER. RICHMOND. In addition to the portions of her long letter cited in the main text of The Poe Log, Mrs. Clemm notes that her son, Henry, is “in his 18th year and at the granite stone cutting business in Baltimore.” This statement is one of several omitted in all previous printings of the letter. (J. Savoye, “Some Updates on Poe’s Correspondence,” E. A. Poe Review, vol. XIII, no. 1, Spring 2012, pp. 13.)


[1836] 26 SEPTEMBER. RICHMOND. Poe sends a letter to Charles Ellis, Sr. requesting $50 worth of dry goods, on credit. If approved, the materials are to be selected by Mrs. Clemm. (Poe to Charles Ellis, September 26, 1836.)


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[1842] ABOUT APRIL?. In a letter, Poe reminds E. L. Carey about “The Pit and the Pendulum,” apparently previously offered for The Gift of 1843. The name of the tale is not specified, but Poe notes that it will fill about 18 pages of the annual, indicating that a manuscript has not yet been sent. Poe dates the letter only as “Thursday Morning,” and addresses it as from the “Office Graham’s Magazine.” (Ostrom, Pollin, Savoye, eds., Letters, 2008, 1:328-329.)

[1842] 19 DECEMBER. PHILADELPHIA. Poe files for bankruptcy in the District Court of the United States in Philadelphia. His debts, as listed in the document, total just over $2,000. (Barbara Cantalupo, “Interview with Jefferson Moak,” E. A. Poe Review, vol. VIII, no. 2, Fall 2007, pp. 92-98.)


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[1843] 13 JANUARY. PHILADELPHIA. Poe’s bankruptcy is granted by the District Court of the United States. (Barbara Cantalupo, “Interview with Jefferson Moak,” E. A. Poe Review, vol. VIII, no. 2, Fall 2007, pp. 92-98.)


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[1844] 18 FEBRUARY. PHILADELPHIA. Poe writes to Louis J. Cist, asking about Mrs. Nichols and stating that he is “upon the point of quitting Philadelphia for some weeks.” (Ostrom, Pollin, Savoye, eds., Letters, 2008, 1:425-426.)

[1844] 12 MARCH. READING, PENNSYLVANIA. Poe checks into the Manion House Hotel. The entry in the register is made by the clerk as “Mr. Poe” of “Philada,” and entered into the log for March 13, with the additional notation of “12th. inst.,” presumably because Poe came to the hotel very late on the previous day. (Charles J. Adams III, “Poe in Reading, PA,” E. A. Poe Review, vol. X, no. 2, Fall 2009, pp. 144-148.)


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[1845] 18 FEBRUARY. NEW YORK. Poe leaves a note for E. L. Duyckinck: “I have the honor to leave for you, with Mr Mathews, a few of my stories, selected from about sixty, as having the best chance of popularity.” (Ostrom, Pollin, Savoye, eds., Letters, 2008, 1:486.)

[1845] 1 NOVEMBER. Poe’s name is one of 20 listed (among more than 220 signers cited) in a formal request to Norwegian violin virtuoso Ole B. Bull in Philadelphia that he give yet one more concert in New York City before he leaves America. The request is printed in the New York Herald for November 12. Ole Bull’s last scheduled concert was in Musical Fund Hall in Philadelphia to “honor George Washington,” but the request suggests that he must come once more to New York to get a full audience and a proper goodbye. The violinist replied to their request from Philadelphia on November 6. The timing, and other names listed — including Parke Godwin, Herman S. Saroni, L. Maria Child, Cath. Sedgwick and Horace Greeley — indicate a movement that was probably initiated in one of the famous soirees hosted by Anne C. Lynch. (This information provided by Ton Fafianie, Oct. 5, 2012.)

[1845] 2, 5, 8 DECEMBER. NEW YORK. In addition to the three noted in the main text for The Poe Log, Poe also sends copies of his anatatic letter to Geoge Poe, Jr. (of Mobile, Alabama), William P. Smith (of Gloucester County, Virginia), and John B. Morris (of Baltimore, Maryland).” (Ostrom, Pollin, Savoye, eds., Letters, 2008, 2:1236-1237.)


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[1846] 10 JANUARY. NEW YORK. Poe writes to Joseph L. Chester, acknowledging a letter of December 11, 1845 and stating: “Under your nom de plume of ‘Julian Cramer’ I have known you long and more than once spoke, editorially, on your behalf. Of course, I am profoundly gratified in finding so warm a friend in one whom I so truly respect and admire.” (Ostrom, Pollin, Savoye, eds., Letters, 2008, 1:551-552.)

[1846] 24 AUGUST. NEW YORK. Poe writes to F. W. Thomas, returing, at Thomas’s request, the manuscript of his “sketches,” at least “all of it not published in the ‘Broadway Journal’. Should you wish copies of the portion published I think I may be able to find them.” Poe also alludes to the recent death of Thomas’s sister, saying “For sorrows such as this there is no consolation but in unrestrained grief.” (Ostrom, Pollin, Savoye, eds., Letters, 2008, 1:559-560.)


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[1848] 18 SEPTEMBER. NEW YORK. Poe writes to John R. Thompson requesting “half a dozen copies of the last ‘Messenger’ — that containing my notice of Mrs. Lewis’s Poems,” and promising that “I will return to Richmond shortly, and will then hand you the money for these.” Poe also states that he presumes “no need of my seeing a proof of ‘The Rationale of Verse’ — I am quite willing to trust to your accuracy.” Poe further expresses his gratitude to Thompson for accepting the essay “without having thoroughly perused it, merely through kind feelings to myself personally,” and offering to refund the purchase amount or replace the article with others if Thompson has any hesitancy about publishing it. (J. Savoye, “Some Updates on Poe’s Correspondence,” E. A. Poe Review, vol. XIII, no. 1, Spring 2012, pp. 8.)


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[1849] BEFORE 30 JUNE. NEW YORK. Poe writes to John R. Thompson, registering a general complain about many of his male friends: “Just when I most needed aid and sympathy from them, they turned upon me, some with a civil sneer, others with brutal, outspoken rudeness, and left me struggling in the mire, unpitied, lonely, desperate. But women do not argue logically as to one’s merits, or demerits: they follow certain heart instincts more profound sometimes than the deductions of philosophy, and so (God eternally bless them!) they have been angels of mercy to me, and have tenderly led me from the verge of ruin while men stood aloof and mocked.” (Ostrom, Pollin, Savoye, eds., Letters, 2008, 2:820-821.)


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Notes:

None.


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[S:0 - TPL, 1987] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Bookshelf - The Poe Log (D. R. Thomas and D. K. Jackson) (Addendum)