Tales of the Folio Club (1832-1836), title page and table of contents


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞



Title page:



TALES

OF THE

FOLIO CLUB

Eleven Tales of the Arabesque



———

BY EDGAR A. POE

———







∞∞∞∞∞∞∞



Table of Contents

  Contents

 

• “The Folio Club”  [prologue, 1833]

 

• “Raising the Wind; or Diddling Considered as One of the Exact Sciences” [”Diddling . . .”]

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “The Visionary”  [”The Assignation”]

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “The Bargain lost” [”Bon-Bon”]

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

Siope” [”Siope — A Fable]

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “MS. Found in a Bottle

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “Metzengerstein

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “A Decided Loss”  [”Loss of Breath”]

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

The Duke de l ’Omelette” [”The Duc de L ’Omelette”]

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “King Pest the First

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “Epimanes

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 

• “Lion-izing

 

• [Burlesque commentary — this text, if it was actually written, has not survived]

 


[Additional tales included by August 1835:]

• “A Tale of Jerusalem

 

• “Berenice

 

• “Morella

 

• “Hans Phall

 

• “Shadow. A Fable

 


[The seventeen tale, included by September 1836:]

• “Von Jung, the Mystific” [”Mystification”]





∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


Notes:

There is no title page or table of contents for the original book (and thus no page numbers). Only Poe’s handwritten introduction and some letters which describe the varying contents survive. What is presented here is a reasonable reconstruction.

The full title of the collection given here is adopted from the two titles mentioned by Poe himself. As the full collection was not printed as Poe intended, and most of the manuscripts of this collection are lost, the versions of the tales used here are taken from the earliest appearance in print. The one exception to this rule is for “Epimanes,” which has been taken from the manuscript of 1833. (Although an early manuscript exists for “Morella” it seems to be a preliminary form and probably not the version Poe would have included in the proposed book.)

This selection and sequence is based on the analysis of Alexander Hammond, “Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of the Folio Club: the Evolution of a Lost Book,” in Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV, ed., Poe at Work: Seven Textual Studies, Baltimore: The Edgar Allan Poe Society, 1978, pp. 13-43. Hammond speculates that Poe may have exaggerated when he said that there were seventeen tales, but this does not seem reasonable as seventeen has no inherent virtue over sixteen unless Poe actually had that many tales in mind. Had the offer been accepted, explaining the downward variance in the number of tales would have been awkward and there seems no reason to presume that Poe was reckless enough to take such chances with a book that had already been rejected by one publisher. Hammond’s position seems to be based on Poe’s statement that all seventeen tales had “appeared in the [Southern Literary] Messenger,” while in fact only fourteen of the tales had been printed there.

Thomas Ollive Mabbott’s selection of the eleven original tales replaces “Raising the Wind” with “A Tale of Jerusalem.” Of the material Poe anticipated to use between the tales, Mabbott comments: “The burlesque criticisms never appeared — and I suspect were never written” (TOM, T&S, 2:201).

The seventeenth tale, referred to in Poe’s letter of September 1836 has not been reliably identified. “Mystification” is offered here as perhaps the most likely candiate, for reasons both of date and tone. This tale was not published until June of 1837, but this late printing may have been caused by Poe’s protracted, though ultimately unsuccessful, efforts to have the whole collection appear as a book. (In T&S, 2:203, Mabbott states that he does not think “Mystification” dates earlier than 1837.) In place of “Mystification,” another possible story is “A Dream,” printed in the Saturday Evening Post (Philadelphia) for August 31, 1831. This story, however, has only been assigned to Poe conjecturally. At any rate, it predates the other tales and seems unlikely as an addition at such a late date.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞

[S:0 - JAS] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - Editions - Tales of the Folio Club (1832-1836)