Some Editions of Edgar Allan Poe’s Works



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At least some of Poe’s works have been in print, in one form or another, since the publication of his first collection of poetry, the now famous and very rare Tamerlane and Other Poems (Boston, 1827). Only about twelve copies of this little pamphlet are known to exist, of which only a few are complete and in good condition. Poe’s subsequent collections in book form of his tales and poems did not sell well and were printed only in fairly small runs. The vast majority of Poe’s writings originally appeared in magazines and newspapers, which in Poe’s day carried poems, stories and literary reviews along with news and other information. Many of Poe’s editorial items were printed without Poe’s name, making attribution difficult. A few poems existed only in the form of manuscripts which were not among Poe’s papers at the time of his death.

Following Poe’s death, the legal rights to his collected works were secured, somewhat surreptitiously through R. W. Griswold, by publisher J. S. Redfield. Redfield published the first two volumes, containing poems and tales, near the end of 1849. A third volume followed in 1850 and a fourth in 1856. (The final four volume edition is generally listed with a copyright of 1856.) This four volume set was quite popular and is thought to have sold several thousand copies a year. Redfield also published a single volume containing just the poems in 1858, with “an original memoir” (presumed to have been written by Charles F. Briggs). The rights to these collections passed through a variety of hands, but continued to be published until about 1886, when the rights were purchased by A. C. Armstrong, which issued Poe’s writings in several forms, most notably a six volume set with additional material and a new memoir by Richard Henry Stoddard. Armstrong appears to have sold the rights to George Putnam’s Sons about 1902. By then, other competing collections had already begun to appear, most notably that assembled and edited by Clarence E. Stedman and George E. Woodberry, published by Stone and Kimball in 1894-1895. Putnam secured the rights to this edition as well and reissued it in full in 1903 to challenge the new 17-volume edition by James A. Harrison, issued in 1902 by T. Y. Crowell. Putnam also issued less substantial editions, though also in ten volumes, beginning in 1902. Among dealers and collectors, the most troublesome edition is probably the undated 10 volume set issued by Harper Brothers.

Shortly after the initial copyrights expired in about 1876, a trickle of competing editions appeared, slowly swelling until it eventually became a full scale publishing free-for-all. The first serious alternative to the Griswold edition was that of John Henry Ingram, published initially in Edinburgh in 1874 and 1875. Foreign publishers had the advantage of ignoring American copyrights, just as American publishers generally ignored foreign copyrights.

A complete listing of all editions of Poe’s works would contain several hundred items. (Most of the 10-volumes sets are fairly common, and primarily repeat the same contents. They are of little interest to the collector or scholar.) Compiling such a list, therefore, is impractical and will not be attempted here. The following items are listed as significant, representative or interesting examples.

 


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These items are listed chronologically.

  • Tamerlane and Other Poems, Boston: Calvin F. S. Thomas, 1827. (There are a number of facsimiles.)
  • Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and Minor Poems, Baltimore: Hatch and Dunning, 1829. (There is a facsimile reprint by T. O. Mabbott, ed., New York: Facsimile Text Society, 1933.)
  • Poems, New York: Elam Bliss, 1831. (There is a facsimile reprint by Campbell, Killis, ed., New York: Facsimile Text Society, 1936.)
  • The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1838).
  • The Conchologist’s First Book, Philadelphia: Haswerl, Barrington, and Haswell, 1839. (Second edition, 1840. Third edition, 1845, with Poe’s name removed from the title page, but his initials still following the preface.)
  • Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, 2 vols, Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1840. (Only 750 were printed. The sales were disappointing and Lea and Blanchard declined to purchase the copyrights from Poe.)
  • The Prose Romances of Edgar A. Poe, Philadelphia: William H. Graham, 1843. (Contains only “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “The Man That Was Used Up.”) (The number of copies printed is unknown, but probably fewer than 250. William was the brother of George Rex Graham, owner and publisher of Graham’s Magazine, of which Poe was an editor for a time. There is a facsimile reprint by George E. Hatvary and T. O. Mabbott, eds., St. John’s University Press, 1968.)
  • Tales, New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1845. (This collection was edited by Evert A. Duyckinck. Poe was unhappy with the selection of tales. It omitted “Ligeia,” which Poe considered to be one of his best stories. See Poe’s letter to Philip P. Cooke, August 9, 1846, Ostrom, Letters, pp. 327-330. At least 1,500 copies were printed.)
  • The Raven and Other Poems, New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1845. (There is a facsimile reprint by T. O. Mabbott, ed., New York: Facsimile Text Society, 1942.)
  • Eureka: A Prose Poem, New York: Geo. P. Putnam, 1848.

 


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It should be noted that none of these editions is truly complete. Some of these editions contain items that are not by Poe; most leave out some items that are by Poe.

Significant Multi-volume Editions:

(These items are listed chronologically. A truly complete edition of Poe’s works has yet to be published.)

  • The Works of the Late Edgar Allan Poe, (Edited by Rufus Wilmot Griswold) vols 1-2, New York: J. S. Redfield, 1850; vol 3, 1850; vol 4, 1856 (reprinted by Redfield until 1859 then by W. J. Widdleton until 1871).
  • Histories Extraordinaires (edited and translated into French by Charles Baudelaire) Paris: Michel Lévy, separate volumes printed in 1856, 1857, 1858, 1863 and 1865.
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by John Henry Ingram) 4 vols., Edinburgh: Black, 1874-1875. (There were several important revised editions.)
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with a memoir by Richard Henry Stoddard) 6 vols., New York: A. C. Armstrong & Son, 1884; also London: Kegan Paul, Trench, 1884. (Also 8 vols., New York: George P. Putnam’s Sons, A. C. Armstrong & Son, 1884, which is essentially the same contents as the 6 volume set, but printed on thicker paper and spread out across the two additional volumes.)
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by Edmund Clarence Stedman and George Edward Woodberry) 10 vols., Chicago: Stone and Kimball, 1894-1895.
  • The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by James Albert Harrison, with textual notes by Robert Armistead Stewart) 17 vols, New York: Thomas Y. Crowell and Company, 1902. (Special edition names: “The Virginia Edition” and “The Monticello Edition.” The Monticello Edition is a larger paper format.)
  • The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe: Volume I - Poems, (edited by Thomas Ollive Mabbott) Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1969. (Second printing 1979. Reprinted as a paperback, with the loss of some appendix material, by Harvard in 1980. Reprinted, with complete text, in 2000 by University of Southern Illinois, in paperback.) The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe; Volumes II-III Tales and Sketches, (edited by Thomas Ollive Mabbott) Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1978. (Second printing 1979. Reprinted in 2000 by University of Southern Illinois, in paperback.)
  • The Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe: Volume I - The Imaginary Voyages (Including The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, The Unparalleled Adventure of one Hans Pfaall and The Journal of Julius Rodman), (edited by Burton R. Pollin) Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1981. (Reprinted by Gordian Press, which has continued the series, all edited by Burton R. Pollin.) Volume II - The Brevities: Pinakidia, Marginalia and Other Works, New York: Gordian Press, 1985. Volumes III & IV - Writings in The Broadway Journal: Nonfictional Prose, New York: Gordian Press, 1986. Volume V - Writings in the Southern Literary Messenger: Nonfictional Prose, New York: Gordian Press, 1997. (Although it has its own sequencing of volumes, this set is intended to supplement rather than supplant the Mabbott edition. Other than the first volume, which follows Mabbott’s plan for Poe’s three long works of fiction, Pollin’s edition focuses on non-fiction prose.)

Lesser Multi-volume Editions:

These items are listed chronologically. Although all claim to be “complete” editions, none contains Poe’s complete works. Primarily, most are missing numerous items of criticism and editorial material. There are many, many sets of Poe’s works issued in 10 volumes since 1902, most promoted as “limited editions.” These editions typically reprint the same texts by Poe, with modifications in the sequence, illustration and introductory material.

  • The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited and with a memoir by Charles F. Richardson) 10 vols., New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons (Fred de Fau), 1902. (Special edition names: “The Fordham Edition,” “The Eldorado Edition” and “The Knickerbocker Edition.”)
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with an introductory essay by W. H. R.) 10 vols, New York: Frank F. Lovell Book Co., 1902.
  • The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe, 10 vols, New York: The Colonial Company, 1903. (A limited edition of 30 numbered sets, printed on Japanese vellum. Special names: “The Manuscript Edition.”)
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with a memoir by W. H. R and illustrations by Arthur E. Becher) 5 volumes, New York: Collier & Son, 1903. (Special names: “The Raven Edition”)
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with an introduction “The Art and Genius of Edgar Allan Poe” by Edwin Markham) 10 vols, New York: Funk and Wagnalls, 1904. (Special edition names: “The Cameo Edition.” Poems and Tales only?)
  • The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with a memoir by Nathan Haskell Dole) 10 vols., Akron, Ohio: Werner Company, 1908.
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, 10 vols., New York: Harper Brothers, nd. (Green cloth binding, with gold lettering and ornamentation. The volumes contain various black and white illustrations. The age and nature of this edition has confused many owners. There is no date on the title pages, but in reprinting material from Griswold’s edition has misled many into thinking it is from 1849-1856. A 1933 reprint by the same publishers gives their copyright as 1926. Some sources refer to it as the “Harper Centenary Edition” and give it a date of 1910, noting that 1909 was the 100th anniversary of Poe’s birth. Anyone familiar with paper and bindings of various periods would assign approximately the same date range without this additional information.)

 


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With one or two exceptions, this list includes only complete items published in book form. Numerous facsimiles exist as single or minor illustrations for articles or in various biographies, which are not included here.

Tamerlane and Other Poems (1827)

These items are listed chronologically by date of publication.

  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Tamerlane and Other Poems. (An edition printed for George Redway in London by Chiswick Press, 1884, with the text taken from the copy in the library of the British Museum, at that time the only copy known. Strictly speaking, this little book is not a facsimile as it does not attempt to reproduce the typography or even the pagination of the original printing. It includes an introduction by Richard Herne Shepherd. A total of 100 numbered copies were printed. Shepherd’s own copy, with corrections, was sent to George E. Woodberry for an American edition, which was not produced, although Woodberry used this copy in preparing the 1894, 10-volume edition of Poe’s works.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Tamerlane and Other Poems. (Facsimile printed by the Literary Collector Press in Greenwich, Connecticut, 1905. A total of 37 copies were printed, 2 on India paper, 10 on Japan paper and 25 on hand-made paper. Copies are numbered. According to ABC, 1960, p. 425, the edition was printed for Frank Maier.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Tamerlane and Other Poems. (Facsimile printed by John Henry Nash in San Francisco, California, 1923. 150 numbered copies were printed. This facsimile was accompanied by a modern printing of the poems, with a comment by James Southall Wilson. This facsimile is based on a copy of the original then owned by Williams Andrews Clark, Jr., without wrappers.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Tamerlane and Other Poems. (Facsimile printed by The Ulysses Bookshop, London, 1931. 288 numbered copies were printed. This facsimile has no identifying marks or imprint, although some have a minor “facsimile” mark in red at the end. This mark is easily removed as it often has been.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Tamerlane and Other Poems. (This typeface facsimile was printed by Wirth, Baltimore, 1939. This facsimile has no identifying marks or imprint. According to a statement by Ferdinand F. Wirth, provided on October 7, 1977 to Alexander G. Rose, of the Poe Society of Baltimore, the edition was 1,500 copies.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Tamerlane and Other Poems. (This facsimile was printed for The Facsimile Text Society in New York by Columbia University Press, 1941. It has introductory notes by T. O. Mabbott.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane and Other Poems. (This facsimile printed for The Facsimile Text Society in New York by Columbia University Press, 1933. It has introductory notes by T. O. Mabbott. A note tipped into some copies indicate that in early printings, two of the unnumbered pages are out of order. No copy of the facimile with the pages in the correct order has been located.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Poems. (This facsimile was printed for The Facsimile Text Society in New York by Columbia University Press, 1935. It has introductory notes by Killis Campbell.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Poems. (The volume Private Perry and Mister Poe, includes a full facsimile, printed by the Louisiana State University Press, 2005. It has a Foreword by Daniel Hoffman, and an interesting introductory essay on “Private Perry and Mister Poe” by Major William F. Hecker, US Army. The copy of Poems reproduced is the one now in the library at West Point.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Phantasy Pieces. (Facsimile probably printed for George Blumenthal in Paris around 1928. This facsimile reproduces volume one of Poe’s Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, with Poe’s revised, hand-lettered title page and table of contents. The number of copies is usually noted as 50.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, The Prose Romances: Containing the “Murders in the Rue Morgue” and the “Man That Was Used Up.” (Facsimile printed by St. John’s University Press, 1968. Prepared by T. O. Mabbott, with an introduction by George E. Hatvary. This facsimile reprints a copy presented by Poe to Francis J. Grund, with a minor inscription in Poe’s hand.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, The Raven and Other Poems. (Facsimile printed for The Facsimile Text Society in New York by Columbia University Press, 1942. This facsimile has introductory notes by T. O. Mabbott and is based on the Lorimer Graham copy, with corrections in Poe’s own hand.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, The Raven and Other Poems. (Facsimile printed in Columbus Ohio by Charles E. Merrill, 1969. This edition includes Poe’s Tales of 1845 and has introductory notes by Jay B. Hubbell.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Tales. (Facsimile printed in Columbus Ohio by Charles E. Merrill, 1969. This edition includes Poe’s Raven and Other Poems of 1845 and has introductory notes by Jay B. Hubbell.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Eureka: A Prose Poem. (A photographic facsimile from the Stephen H. Wakeman copy, with Poe’s own handwritten annotations. Printed for George Blumenthal in Paris around 1928. The number of copies is usually noted as 50.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, Eureka: A Prose Poem. (Hartford, Connecticut: Transcendental Books, 1973. A complete, but rather crudely reproduced facsimile of Eureka, with added line numbers. Includes introductory material by Richard P. Benton.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, manuscript for “Murders in the Rue Morgue.” (A facsimile of the manuscript in the Drexel Institute. Printed in Philadelphia by George Barrie, around 1895. Some copies of this facsimile were printed on Japanese vellum. Other editions were printed between 1896-1905 by George Barrie and Sons.) (In 1898, this facsimile was included as volume VII in a seven-volume set of Poe’s works called the “Tamerlane” edition, published by Croscup & Sterling in New York. The size of this volume is only 8 inches x 6 inches, so the manuscript is even more reduced. It is bound in green cloth. There were 120 numbered sets issued in this edition.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, manuscript for “Epimanies.” (A faithful facsimile on Japanese vellum of the 1833 three-page manuscript, including creases and postal markings, one sheet, folded and printed on three sides, unbound. Like the Phantasy Pieces and Eureka facsimiles, this facsimile is likely to have been executed for George Blumenthal about 1928. As such the number of copies is probably no more than 50.) (A reduced, photographic facsimile of the manuscript appears in Quoth the Raven: Selections from the Edgar Allan Poe Collection of Susan Jaffe Tane, Richmond, VA: The Poe Foundation, 1997, pp. 24-26.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, manuscript for “Hans Phaall” (Volume 1 of the Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe: The Imaginary Voyages, edited by Burton R. Pollin, New York: Gordian Press, 1981. Between pages 385 and 387 appears a photographic facsimile of the complete 1835 twenty-page manuscript of Hans Phaall (later “Hans Pfaall”) from the Morgan Pierpont Library. One quarter of the final sheet is missing, affecting pages 19 and 20. The facsimile is approximately the same size as the original, which is unusually small, with tiny and very careful printing.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, manuscript for “The Light-house.” (A photographic facsimile of the 1849 seven-page manuscript fragment in The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe; Volumes II-III Tales and Sketches, edited by Thomas Ollive Mabbott, Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1978. Volume III, pp. 1394-1400.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, letters: Field, Eugene, ed., Some Letters of Edgar Allan Poe to E. H. N. Patterson of Oquawka, Illinois, Chicago: The Caxton Club, 1898. (Includes beautiful facsimiles on Japanese vellum of several Poe letters as well a facsimile Poe’s own hand-lettered cover design for his proposed magazine The Stylus.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, letters: Stanard, Mary Newton, ed., Edgar Allan Poe Letters Till Now Unpublished in the Valentine Museum Richmond, Virginia, Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1925. (Includes photographic facsimiles of many Poe letters.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, letters: Quinn, A. H. and Richard H. Hart, eds., Edgar Allan Poe: Letters and Documents in the Enoch Pratt Free Library, New York: Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1941. (Includes photographic facsimiles of several Poe letters as well as letters by Maria Clemm, John J. Moran and others.)

Miscellaneous Facsimiles

These items are listed alphabetically by author or editor.

  • Allen, Hervey and T. O. Mabbott, eds., Poe’s Brother: The Poems of William Henry Leonard Poe, New York: George H. Doran, 1926. (Includes facsimiles of several of Henry’s stories and poems from the Baltimore North American.)
  • Lowell, James Russell, The Pioneer, January - March 1843. (With an introduction by Sculley Bradley, New York: Scholar’s Facsimiles & Reprints, 1947. This facsimile of the full 3-issue run of Lowell’s magazine The Pioneer includes the first printings of Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “Notes Upon English Verse” as well as revised version of “Lenore.”)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, The Broadway Journal, January 1845 - January 1846. (2 volumes. New York: AMS Press, 1965. A full-sized facsimile, lacking only some of the white space at the top and bottom of each page, of the full run of the Broadway Journal.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, The Broadway Journal (nonfictional prose). (Volume 3 of the Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe: The Broadway Journal, Nonfictional Prose, edited by Burton R. Pollin, New York: Gordian Press, 1986. This volume reproduces the text of Poe’s writings as printed in The Broadway Journal of 1845-1846, with the exception of poetry and tales. Handwritten marks in this edition are not Poe’s, although they are an attempt to include a representation of Poe’s own notes from the two volumes of The Broadway Journal he gave to Sarah Helen Whitman.)
  • Poe, Edgar Allan, The Southern Literary Messenger (nonfictional prose). (Volume 5 of the Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe: The Southern Literary Messenger, Nonfictional Prose, edited by Burton R. Pollin, New York: Gordian Press, 1998. This volume reproduces the text of Poe’s writings as printed in The Southern Literary Messenger of 1835-1850, with the exception of poetry, tales, “Marginalia” and small filler items included by Pollin under the general headings of “Pinikidia” and “Supplemental Pinikidia.” Although the text is a facsimile of The Southern Literary Messenger, it has been cut and rearranged to efficiently fill the pages. In so doing, the original pagination and column arrangement are completely obscured.)
  • Varner, John Grier, Jr., ed., Edgar Allan Poe and the Philadelphia “Saturday Courier,” Charlottesville: University of Virginia, Extension Division, 1933. (Includes facsimiles of Poe’s “Metzengerstein,” “The Duke De L’Omelette,” “A Tale of Jerusalem,” “A Decided Loss,” “The Bargain Lost,” “Raising the Wind; or, Diddling Considered as One of the Exact Sciences.” Also includes facsimiles of clippings concerning the contest.)

 


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These items are listed chronologically.

  • Tamerlane and Other Poems, Boston: Calvin F. S. Thomas, 1827. (There are a number of facsimiles.)
  • Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and Minor Poems, Baltimore: Hatch and Dunning, 1829. (There is a facsimile reprint by T. O. Mabbott, ed., New York: Facsimile Text Society, 1933.)
  • Poems, New York: Elam Bliss, 1831. (There is a facsimile reprint by Campbell, Killis, ed., New York: Facsimile Text Society, 1936.)
  • The Raven and Other Poems, New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1845. (There is a facsimile reprint by T. O. Mabbott, ed., New York: Facsimile Text Society, 1942.)
  • Poems by Edgar Allan Poe, (with a memoir by George R. Graham and N. P.Willis) New York: H. M. Caldwell, 1850. (Graham’s memoir is essentially a reprint of his 1850 article from Graham’s Magazine.)
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with an introduction by James Hannay) London: J. and C. Brown, n.d. (circa 1854).
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with an anonymous “Memoir of Edgar Allan Poe,” which has been attributed to Charles F. Briggs although disputed by Pollin, p. 240), New York: J. S. Redfield, 1858. (A full-sized and lavishly illustrated edition, featuring woodcuts designed by F. R. Pickersgill, John Tenniel, Birket Foster, Felix O. C. Darley, Jasper Cropsey, Peter Paul Duggan, Percival Skelton, and A. M. Madot. The copyright is 1857. The same edition was published simultaneously in London by Sampson Low, Son and Co.)
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with a the same anonymous “Memoir of Edgar Allan Poe” as above, New York: J. S. Redfield, 1859. (A broadside advertisement, listed for sale by Bartleby’s Books in 2006, promises the new edition “in Blue and Gold” and “With Memoir and Portrait / One Vol. 32mo., Price 75 Cents” to be available beginning June 15. This edition is one of several “done up in the blue and gold” format which was extremely popular for small “cabinet” editions. Reprinted by W. J. Widdleton, with the same memoir, beginning in 1863. Some later editions, including one from 1865, were printed in a larger format, although the smaller “Blue and Gold” edition was reprinted in 1867.)
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with a memoir by F. M. H.) London: Ward, Lock, n.d. (circa 1870).
  • Poems by Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by Richard Henry Stoddard) New York: W. J. Widdleton, 1875.
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Complete. With Memoir and Vindication (with an introductory essay by William Fearing Gill) New York: W. J. Widdleton, 1876. (Gill’s essay essentially reprints his article “Edgar A. Poe and His Biographer, Rufus W. Griswold,” Laurel Leaves, 1875, pp. 279-306, omitting the first two introductory paragraphs.)
  • The Life and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, New York: W. J. Widdleton, 1877. (The “Life of Poe” is by Eugene Lemoine Didier, and includes an introductory letter from Sarah H. Whitman. This edition was reissued by the same publisher in 1879. The same collection was reissued by A. C. Armstrong in 1882. An 1880 edition by Widdleton is referred to as “The Diamond Edition,” but omits Mrs. Whitman’s letter. According to a letter from S. H. Whitman to J. H. Ingram, W. F. Gill hoped that his memoir from the 1876 edition would be included with Didier’s “Life of Poe,” but Didier refused the option.)
  • The Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by Andrew Lang) London: Kegan Paul, Trench, 1881. (Reissued London, 1892.)
  • The Complete Poetical Works and Essays on Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe, Together with His Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, (edited, annotated and with an introduction by John H. Ingram) London and New York: Frederick Warne & Co., 1888.
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with “a prefatory notice, biographical and critical, by Joseph Skipsey”) London: Walter Scott, Ltd, 1903. (This edition is printed as part of the Canterbury Poets series, edited by William Sharp.)
  • The Best Poems and Essays of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by Sherwin Cody) Chicago: A. C. McClurg & Company, 1903.
  • The Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, New York: Duffield, 1907. (Reissued as a separate volume from the multi-volume Stedman and Woodberry edition of 1894-1895. Reissued again by New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1924.)
  • The Complete Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by James H. Whitty) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1911. (A second edition, with revisions, appeared in 1917. A third edition, also noted as revised, appeared in 1918, although some copies are dated as 1919. An edition with prefatory material dated January 1920, ends the text at p. 185, omitting some of the appendix material and all of the notes, but retaining the index of titles and first lines. Whitty was an important scholar, but prone to sensationalize. His volumes contain several poems that have since been determined as not being by Poe, most notably “The Vital Stream.”)
  • The Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by Killis Campbell) Boston: Ginn and Company, 1917. (Although it is not widely known, there are two issues of this edition. Neither bears an imprint date, and both have only the 1917 copyright. They are distinguishable by the appearance of “Serenade,” on p. 137, the removal of “Gratitude,” which had been on p. 145, and the shifting of material between these pages. As a result, the page references in the notes, for items on pages 299-303 are off by one page. To avoid altering the pagination for the notes themselves, a portion of the note for “Latin Hymn,” on p. 298, has been omitted to make way for the new note for “Serenade.” All of these changes appear in the second issue, which must have been printed after May 1918, the latest date mentioned in the notes, on p. 219 and p. 298.)
  • The Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by Floyd Stovall) Charlottesville: The University of Virginia Press, 1965. (This is an excellent collection of Poe’s poems, although it is slightly less complete than the Mabbott edition below.)
  • The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe: Volume I - Poems, (edited by Thomas Ollive Mabbott) Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1969. (Second printing 1979.)

 


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These items are listed chronologically. There are many editions of Poe’s tales which are not listed here.

  • Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (2 vols, Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1840). (Only 750 were printed. The sales were disappointing and Lea and Blanchard declined to purchase the copyrights from Poe.)
  • The Prose Romances of Edgar A. Poe (Philadelphia: William H. Graham, 1843). (Contains only “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “The Man That Was Used Up.”) (The number of copies printed is unknown, but probably fewer than 250. William was the brother of George Rex Graham, owner and publisher of Graham’s Magazine, of which Poe was an editor for a time. There is a facsimile reprint by George E. Hatvary and T. O. Mabbott, eds., St. John’s University Press, 1968.)
  • Tales (New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1845) (This collection was edited by Evert A. Duyckinck. Poe was unhappy with the selection of tales. It omitted “Ligeia,” which Poe considered to be one of his best stories. See Poe’s letter to Philip P. Cooke, August 9, 1846, Ostrom, Letters, pp. 327-330. At least 1,500 copies were printed.)
  • The Prose Tales of Edgar Allan Poe, 2 vols, W. J. Widdleton, 1867.
  • The Prose Tales of Edgar Allan Poe, 3 vols, W. J. Widdleton, 1877 (issued as “Widdleton’s Cheap Edition of Poe’s Works,” an early paperback, for 50 cents a volume.) This set was later reprinted by New York: A. C. Armstrong & Son, 1884 and 1889, with minor variations in the sequence of the tales, along with some additional material.
  • Tales by Edgar Allan Poe, (edited with an introduction by Hamilton Wright Mabie) New York: Century, 1901.
  • Tales of Romance and Fantasy, London: Blackie & Son Ltd, n.d. (about 1908). (This book was advertised as part of “Blackie’s Library of Famous Books.” The brief introduction is unsigned.)
  • The Best Tales of Edgar Allan Poe (edited by Sherwin Cody) New York: Modern Library, 1924.
  • Poe Short Stories, (edited by Killis Campbell) New York: Sun Dial Press, 1927.
  • The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe; Volumes II-III Tales and Sketches, (edited by Thomas Ollive Mabbott) Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1978. (Second printing 1979). (This is essentially the definitive edition of Poe’s tales, lacking only “Pym,” “Rodman” and “Pfaall.”)
  • The Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe; (Vol I- The Imaginary Voyages (Including The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, The Unparalleled Adventure of one Hans Pfaall and The Journal of Julius Rodman), (edited by Burton R. Pollin) Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1981. (This is essentially the definitive edition of Poe’s three long fictional works.)

 


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These items are listed chronologically. There are many selected editions of Poe’s tales and poems which are not listed here.

  • The Select Works of Edgar Allan Poe, (with Griswold’s memoir of Poe and an excerpt of that by N. P. Willis) 2 volumes bound as one, Leipzig: Alphons Durr, 1856. (This edition was printed as volume XIII of the Standard American Authors series, published under the superintendence of Dr. Karl Elze. It includes a selection of Poe’s poems and tales, with “The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym” and “Eureka.” A brief editorial note, introducing excerpts from the article by N. P. Willis, states “Dr. Griswold — if these pages should ever meet his eye — will certainly pardon the present editor for having ventured thus to tone down a highly colored picture of one of the most gifted poets of America.” This comment strongly suggests that this volume was prepared without Griswold’s knowledge, although the text is clearly lifted from Griswold’s edition as published by J. S. Redfield except for Pym, which does not contain the various changes in Griswold’s text and is instead reprinted from the American edition of 1838.)
  • The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, 8 vols. (London: J. Shiells & Co, Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1895; reprinted by Lippincott in 1905) (contains 24 photogravures)
  • Prose Tales by Edgar Allan Poe (with an introduction by J. R. Lowell), New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, n.d. (1898). (This edition is prefaced by this note: “The twelve tales here presented are generally regarded as representative of Poe’s peculiar genius. They are selected from the edition of 1850. . . . an edition so rare that it is not in the Boston Public Library or in the Athenaeum.”)
  • The Gold Bug and The Black Cat, (with historical and critical comments by Henry Austin) New York: R. F. Fenno & Company, 1899.
  • The Mystery of Marie Roget, (with historical and critical comments by Henry Austin) New York: R. F. Fenno & Company, 1899.
  • The Murders in the Rue Morgue and A Tale of the Ragged Mountains, (with historical and critical comments by Henry Austin) New York: R. F. Fenno & Company, 1899.
  • Poems and Tales of Edgar Allan Poe (edited by Alphonso Gerald Newcomer) Chicago: Scott, Foresman, 1902.
  • The Stories and Poems by Edgar Allan Poe, (with an introduction by Edward Everett Hale, Jr.) New York: University Publishing, 1904.
  • Tales by Edgar Allan Poe, (with an introduction by Hamilton Wright Mabie) New York: Century, 1908.
  • The Book of Poe: Tales, Criticisms, Poems, (Edited by Addison Hibbard, with an introduction by Hervey Allen) Garden City, NJ: Doubleday, Doran, 1929.
  • The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, (with an introduction by Hervey Allen) New York: Random House, 1938.
  • Selected Tales and Poems, (with an introduction by Hervey Allen) New York: W. J. Black, 1943.
  • The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, (with an introduction by Hervey Allen) New York: Random House, 1944.
  • The Portable Poe, (edited by Philip Van Doren Stren) New York: Viking, 1945. (This volume has since been reprinted several times.)
  • The Complete Poems and Stories of Edgar Allan Poe, with Selections from His Critical Writings, (edited by Arthur Hobson Quinn and Edward H. O’Neill) 2 vols, New York: A. A. Knopf, 1946
  • Selected Poetry and Prose, (edited by T. O. Mabbott), New York: Modern, 1951.
  • Poetry and Tales, (edited by Patrick F. Quinn) New York: The Library of America, 1978.

 


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These items are listed chronologically.

  • Selections from the Critical Writings of Edgar Allan Poe (edited by Frederick C. Prescott), New York: Henry Holt, 1909.
  • Politian, an Unfinished Tragedy, by Edgar Allan Poe (edited by T. O. Mabbott), Richmond: The Edgar Allan Poe Shrine, 1923. (Also issued by Menasha, Wisconsin: The Collegiate Press of George Banta Publishing Company, 1923.) (Mabbott printed some corrections to this edition in “The Text of Poe’s Play ‘Politian’,” Notes and Queries, CLXXXIX, July 1945, p. 14.)
  • Doings in Gotham, by Edgar Allan Poe; as Described in a Series of Letters to the Editors of the Columbia Spy (edited by Jacob E. Spannuth, with introduction and commentary by T. O. Mabbott), Pottsville, PA 1929. (The poem “A New Year’s Address of the Carriers of the Columbia Spy” included in this edition has since been determined by T. O. Mabbott as not being by Poe. This attribution was retracted in Mabbott’s edition of Poe’s Poems, 1969, p. 508, item 65.)
  • Edgar Allan Poe’s Contributions to Alexander’s Weekly Messenger (edited with an introduction by Clarence S. Brigham), Worcester, Massachusetts: The American Antiquarian Society, 1943.
  • Literary Criticism of Edgar Allan Poe, (edited by Robert L. Hough), Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1965.

 


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These items are listed chronologically.

  • Little Blue Books (With covers measuring 5 inches high by 3 1/2 inches wide, this popular series of slender, cheaply printed booklets includes seventeen titles of interest to Poe aficionados. None of these books carry a date, so all are generally noted as @1920. The publisher of the series was Haldeman-Julius Company of Girard, Kansas. Each book originally cost 25-cents, but was reduced to 5-cents, or $44 for the entire set, originally 900 booklets. A minimum order was 20 books. By 1923, the series had expanded to over 2,000 titles. The price was later raised to 10-cents each. A leather book cover was available for 50-cents. Although most booklets in the series aptly fit the label “Little Blue Books,” some had covers which were orange, yellow or even pink. In later editions, the plain covers featuring only simple text were replaced with illustrated ones. The editor for the series was Emanuel Haldeman-Julius (1889-1951), a controversial figure who published books on a variety of radical subjects, socialism and the KKK. In addition to these items, he included others on agriculture and farming, health and hygiene, self-improvement, history, religion and psychology. He also published a large number of works of great literature both to establish credibility and perhaps with a genuine interest in making such writings available and affordable to everyone. A collection of Haldeman-Julius’s correspondence is the J. K. Lilly Library at the University of Indiana.)
    • No. 12 - Tales of Mystery, Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s tales: “The Cask of Amontillado,” “The Black Cat,” “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Purloined Letter.”) (61 pages)
    • No. 32 - Poems (with two introductory essays, on Poe’s life and poetry, and notes by Nelson Antrim Crawford), Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s poems: “The Raven,” “Bridal Ballad,” “The Sleeper,” “Lenore,” “Dream-Land,” “The Valley of Unrest,” “The City in the Sea,” “Silence,” “The Coliseum,” “Israfel,” “The Haunted Palace,” “The Conqueror Worm,” “Eldorado,” “Eulalie,” “The Bells,” “Annabel Lee,” “Ulalume,” “To F——,” “To F——s O——d,” “To Helen,” “To ——,” “To My Mother,” “A Dream Within a Dream” and “Alone.”) (60 pages, plus 4 pages of advertisements.)
    • No. 108 - The Fall of the House of Usher (No. 108), Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s tales: “The Fall of the House of Usher,” “The Pit and the Pendulum” and “The Masque of the Red Death.”) (61 pages)
    • No. 144 - Was Poe Immoral? (by Sarah Helen Whitman), Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes S. H. Whitman’s essay, originally published as Poe and His Critics.) (61 pages, plus 3 pages of advertisements.)
    • No. 162 - The Murders in the Rue Mogue , Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s tales “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “Ms. Found in a Bottle.”) (63 pages)
    • No. 186 - How I Wrote “The Raven” , Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s essay “The Philosophy of Composition” and “The Raven.”) (31 pages, plus 1 page of advertisements.)
    • No. 290 - The Gold Bug, Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (64 pages)
    • No. 729 - Poe’s Marginalia (edited, with an introduction, by Isaac Goldberg) Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, 1924. (56 pages, with 8 pages of advertisements)
    • No. 730 - Poe as a Literary Critic (essay by Isaac Goldberg) Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, 1924. (59 pages, plus 5 pages of advertisements)
    • No. 731 - Critical Excerpts from Poe (edited, with an introduction and notes, by Isaac Goldberg) Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, 1925. (61 pages, plus 3 pages of advertisements)
    • No. 356 - Essay on Poe (by Edmund Clarence Stedman) Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Stedman’s full chapter on Poe from The Poets of America, revised in 1886 from his essay in Scribners Magazine for May 1880) (59 pages, plus 5 pages of advertisements.)
    • No. 939 - Tales of Imaginative Science, Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s tales: “A Descent Into the Maelstrom,” “The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade” and “Mellonta Tauta.”) (64 pages)
    • No. 940 - Tales Grotesque and Weird, Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (At some point, this booklet seems to have been called Tales Grotesque and Amusing.) (Includes Poe’s tales: “The Devil in the Belfry,” “X-ing in Paragrab” [“X-ing a Paragrab”], “The Sphinx,” “The Imp of the Perverse” and “The Assignation.” Two of these tales are incorrectly noted as “first printed in Griswold.”) (61 pages, plus 3 pages of advertisements.)
    • No. 941 - Tales Psychological and Gruesome, Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s tales: “William Wilson,” “The Man of the Crowd” and “Berenice.”) (61 pages, plus 3 pages of advertisements.)
    • No. 943 - Masterpieces of Mystery, Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes: “The Great Valdez Sapphire,” by an anonymous writer; “The Oblong Box,” by Edgar Allan Poe; and “The Torture by Hope,” by Villiers de L’Isle Adam.) (60 pages, plus 4 pages of advertisements.)
    • No. 1154 - Tales of Hypnotism and Revenge, Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Company, @1920. (Includes Poe’s tales: “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar,” “Hop-Frog,” “Ligeia,” “Shadow” and “Silence.”) (64 pages)
    • No. B-692 - The Wisdom of Edgar Allan Poe (selected, with an introduction, by Bonny Wood; edited by E. Haldeman-Julius), Girard, Kansas, Haldeman-Julius Publications, 1948. (A much larger format than the standard “little blue books,” printed on pulp paper with a plain tan paper cover. Contains a 2-page introduction by Bonny Wood; 3+ pages of “Opinins on Poe,” some selections from “Marginalia,” “Miscellaneous Excerpts” not specifically identified; the introduction to “The Literati of New York”; “Some Secrets of the Magazine Prison-House,” “Lionizing,” “The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq.”; “The Philosophy of Composition”; and “Mellonta Tauta.”)
  • Little Leather Library (With covers measuring 4 inches high by 3 inches wide, this popular series of slender, cheaply printed booklets includes four titles of interest to Poe aficionados. None of these books carry a date, so all are generally noted as @1910-1924. The publisher of the series was the Little Leather Library Corporation of New York, later Robert K. Hass, Inc. Covers appear in suede, leather in various colors, green leatherette (also in brown and red), and red leather with gold lettering. Some of these carry embossed labels, while others are merely stamped. The leatherette series also carries the label “The Redcroft Edition.” In later editions, as the dark green and brown covers gave way to bright red, they were named the Little Luxart Library. In addition to Poe, the series includes over 100 titles by Longfellow, Kipling, DeMaupassant, Tennyson, Wilde, Shakespeare and others. There was even a 30-volume Bible. The leather cover and lack of any publication or copyright date has fooled many collectors into assuming that they have an original, that is to say an 1845, edition of “The Raven and Other Poems.”)
    • The Gold Bug, New York: Little Leather Library Corporation, @1922. (93 pages) (Includes Poe’s tale: “The Gold Bug.”)
    • Murders in the Rue Morgue, New York: Little Leather Library Corporation, @1922. (Includes Poe’s tales: “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” “The Black Cat” and “The Purloined Letter.”) (126 pages)
    • The Raven and Other Poems, New York: Little Leather Library Corporation, @1922. (Includes Poe’s poems: “Al Aaraaf,” “Romance,” “To ——” (“The bowers whereat . . . “), “To The River ——,” “To ——” (I heed not . . .”), “Fairy-Land,” “To Helen” (“Helen, thy beauty is . . .”), “Israfel,” “The City in the Sea,” “The Sleeper,” “Lenore,””The Valley of Unrest,” “The Coliseum,” “Hymn,” “Scenes from Politian,” “Sonnet to Zante,” “Bridal Ballad,” “The Haunted Palace,” “Sonnet — Silence,” “To One in Paradise,” “The Conqueror Worm,” “Dream-land,” “Eulalie — A Song,” “To F——,” “To F——s S. O——d,” “The Raven,” “To. M. L. S——,” “Ulalume,” “To — — ” (“Not long ago . . .”), “To Helen” (“I saw thee once . . .”), “An Enigma,” “For Annie,” “A Valentine,” “To My Mother,” “Annabel Lee” and “The Bells.” (100+ pages, unnumbered)
    • Fifty Best Poems of America , New York: Little Leather Library Corporation, @1922. (The Poe poems included are: “To Helen,” “The City in the Sea” and “The Haunted Palace.”) (96 pages, with the Poe items on pp. 27-32.)

 


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These items are listed chronologically. There are many illustrated editions. For a substantially complete catalogue, see the book by Burton R. Pollin noted in the bibliography below.

  • Tales of Mystery, Imagination and Humor; And Poems, London: Henry Vizetelly, 1852. (This is the first illustrated edition of Poe’s works. The illustrators are not identified.)
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, London: Addey and Co., 1853. (This edition includes an introductory essay by James Hannay and illustrations by E. H. Wehnert, James Godwin, F. W. Hume and Harrison Weir.)
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, London, 1858. (This edition includes illustrations by F. R. Pickersgill, John Tenniel, Birket Foster, Felix O. C. Darley, Jasper Cropsey, P. Duggan, Percival Kelton and A. M. Madut. Tenniel is best remembered for his classic illustrations for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland.)
  • The Raven, New York: Harper and Brothers, 1884. (This is edition includes the classic illustrations by Gustave Dore. Dore, who was best known for his Bible illustrations, is arguably the most famous illustrator of the 19th century. This volume was his last commission., the publication finally being completed after his death, at the age of 51. Although the imprint date reads 1884, the book was issued about November 3, 1883, in anticipation of the holiday season. The beautiful title page was designed by Elihu Vedder, and the cover, featuring an angel with broad wings and holding a candle, was designed by Dora Wheeler, later Dora Wheeler Keith. About the same time, an edition was also printed in London, by Samson Low, Marston &. Co., with a plain title page, bearing an imprint date of 1883, and a much less elaborate cover. The understandable confusion over the imprint dates has sometimes misled dealers and collectors to claim the London edition as the “true” first edition.)
  • The Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, London: George Bell and Sons, 1900. (This edition contains glorious art-deco illustrations by W. Heath Robinson. Robinson was only about 28 years old at the time.)
  • Tales of Mystery and Imagination, London: George Harrap and New York: Brentanos, 1919. (This famous and frequently copied collection features elaborate illustrations by Harry Clarke. The original edition comprised 24 black and white illustrations, plus front cover and spine illustration and 10 decorative tailpieces. The book was so well received that it was reissued in 1923 with 8 additional illustrations in full color. It was reprinted in New York by Tudor in 1933, 1935, 1936 and 1939. These illustrations have been reprinted numerous times, most notably in London by Chancellor Press in 1985.)
  • The Bells and Other Poems, London and New York: Hodder and Stoughton, n.d.. (This @1912 edition includes the famous illustrations by Edmund Dulac. These have since been reprinted several times, including one from around 1920 in New York by George H. Doran, n.d.)
  • The Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe, London: George G. Harrap and Co., 1935. (This edition includes illustrations by Aurthur Rackham. These have since been reprinted several times. The first edition was issued as 450 numbered copies, signed by the artist.)

 



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These items are listed chronologically.

  • Borghers, Alphonse, trans., Nouvelles Choisies D’Edgar Poe: Le Scarabee D’Or, L’Aeronaute Hollandaise, Paris: L. Hachete, 1853. (Includes translations of Poe’s “The Gold-Bug” and “Hans Pfaall.”)
  • Baudelaire, Charles, trans., Histories extraordinaires, 1856. (French)
  • Baudelaire, Charles, trans., Nouvelles Histories extraordinaires, 185? (French)
  • Baudelaire, Charles, trans., Adventures D’Arthur Gordon Pym, 185? (French)
  • Baudelaire, Charles, trans., Eureka, 185? (French)
  • Baudelaire, Charles, trans., Histories Grotesques et Serieuses, 1865? (French)
  • Dostoyevski, 1861 (Russian)
  • Ferenczi, Gyorgy,1895 (Hungarian)
  • Balmont, Konstantin, trans., Poe: Ballady i fantasii (Ballads and Fantasies), Moscow, 1895 (Russian)
  • Balmont, Konstantin, trans., Poe: Sobranie sochilnenni (Collected Works), Moscow, 1901 (Russian) (Reprinted in 1912.)

 


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  • Jacob Blanck, compiler, Bibliography of American Literature, 8 vols, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1955-1990. (Compiled for the Bibliographical Society of America. Edgar Allan Poe is included in volume 7, edited and completed by Virginia L. Smyers and Michael Winship, 1983.)
  • Dameron, J. Lasley and Irby B. Cauthen, Jr., Edgar Allan Poe: A Bibliography of Criticism, 1827 - 1967; Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia (for The Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia), 1974. (This bibliography includes numerous collections, listed by name of the author of the memoir, introductory material or textual notes for that edition.)
  • Pollin, Burton R., Images of Poe’s Works: A Comprehensive Descriptive Catalogue of Illustrations, New York: Greenwood Publishing Group, 1989.

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[S:0 - JAS] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - Some Editions of Poe’s Works