Text: Edgar Allan Poe (ed. J. A. Harrison), “Review of The Crayon Miscellany,” The Complete Works of Edgar Allan PoeVol. VIII: Literary Criticism - part 01 (1902), pp. 91-92


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


[page 91, continued:]

THE CRAYON MISCELLANY. BY THE AUTHOR OF THE SKETCH BOOK NO. 3 — CONTAINING LEGENDS OF THE CONQUEST OF SPAIN. PHILADELPHIA: CAREY, LEA & BLANCHARD.

[Southern Literary Messenger, December, 1835.]

WE feel it almost an act of supererogation to speak of this book, which is long since in the hands of every American who has leisure for reading at all. The matter itself is deeply interesting, but, as usual, its chief beauty is beauty of style. The Conquest of Spain by the Saracens, an event momentous in the extreme, is yet enveloped, as regards the motives and actions of the principal dramatis personae in triple doubt and confusion. To snatch from this uncertainty a few striking and picturesque legends, possessing, at the same time, some absolute portion of verity, and to adorn them in his own magical language is all that Mr. Irving has done in the present instance. But that he has done this little well it is needless to say. He does not claim for the Legends the authenticity of history properly so [page 92:] called, — yet all are partially facts, and however extravagant some may appear, they will all, to use the words of the author himself, “be found in the works of sage and reverend chroniclers of yore, growing side by side with long acknowledged truths, and might be supported by learned and imposing references in the margin.” Were we to instance any one of the narratives as more beautiful than the rest, it would be The Story of the Marvellous and Portentous Tower.

 


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


Notes:

None.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞

[S:1 - JAHCW, 1902] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Editions - The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe (J. A. Harrison) (Review of The Crayon Miscellany)