Text: Edgar Allan Poe (ed. J. A. Harrison), “Review of Inaugural Address of the Rev. D. L. Carroll,” The Complete Works of Edgar Allan PoeVol. VIII: Literary Criticism - part 01 (1902), pp. 116-117


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[page 116:]

INAUGURAL ADDRESS OF THE REV. D. L. CARROLL, D.D. PRESIDENT OF HAMPDEN SIDNEY COLLEGE, DELIVERED ON HIS INDUCTION INTO THAT OFFICE. PUBLISHED BY REQUEST OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. RICHMOND: T. W. WHITE, 1835.

[Southern Literary Messenger, December, 1835.]

THE friends of literature in Virginia have lately been favored with several Inaugural Addresses, each of which has had its peculiar merits. It is only of that whose title has just been given, that we intend to speak. In the correspondence which is prefixed to this Address, we learn that it was “prepared with great haste, amidst anxieties and efforts to regain health, and amidst all the inquietudes of journeying and absence from home.” Apologies are seldom worth the time spent in making or reading them. Generally, an author who prints his production may be supposed to consider it of some value. To make an apology, then, similar to that of Mr. Carroll, is but a modest way of hinting that, with a fair trial, the writer could have done much better. On the whole we wish that there had been no apology; for the Address needs none. It is not our purpose to give an outline of this discourse, or enter into a critical examination of its merits — for merits it has. We wish merely to call the attention of the reader to a few extracts, hoping that a perusal of these will induce him to procure and read the whole Address for himself. The first of these extracts is on a subject too long overlooked, and too much neglected in all our schools. We refer to social qualities. On this subject the author’s ideas are just and timely. He says: [page 117:]

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We are no less pleased with the following sentiments on the subject of the moral influences that should pervade a College.

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The conclusion of Mr. Carroll’s Address is full of fervid eloquence, rendered doubly interesting by a vein of that truest of all philosophy, the philosophy of the Christian. In the two last paragraphs sentiments are expressed, which at their delivery must have produced a strong sensation. Such indeed we learn from those present on the occasion, was their effect.

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Notes:

None.


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[S:1 - JAHCW, 1902] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Editions - The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe (J. A. Harrison) (Review of Inaugural Address of the Rev. D. L. Carroll)