Text: Edgar Allan Poe (ed. J. A. Harrison), “Review of A New and Compendious Latin Grammar,” The Complete Works of Edgar Allan PoeVol. IX: Literary Criticism - part 02 (1902), pp. 166-167


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[page 166, continued:]

A NEW AND COMPENDIOUS LATIN GRAMMAR; WITH APPROPRIATE EXERCISES, ANALYTICAL AND SYNTHETICAL. FOR THE USE OF PRIMARY SCHOOLS, ACADEMIES, AND COLLEGES. BY BAYNARD R. HALL, A. M. PRINCIPAL OF THE BEDFORD CLASSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL ACADEMY, AND FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF THE ANCIENT LANGUAGES IN THE COLLEGE OF INDIANA. PHILADELPHIA: HARRISON HALL.

[Southern Literary Messenger, October, 1836.]

THE excellences of this grammar have been so well proved, and the work itself so heartily recommended by some of the first scholars in our country that, at [page 167:] this late day especially, we feel called upon to say but little in its behalf. But that little we can say conscientiously. It appears to us at least as well adapted to its purposes as any Latin Grammar within our knowledge. In some respects it has merits to be met with in no other. It is free from every species of empiricism, and, following the good old track as far as that track can be judiciously followed, admits of no royal road to the acquisition of Latin. The arrangement is lucid and succinct — yet the work embodies a vast deal of matter which could have been obtained only through reference to many of the most elaborate treatises of Europe. In its analysis of idiom it excels any similar book now in common use — an advantage of the highest importance. The size of the work is moderate, yet nothing of consequence to the student is omitted. The definitions are remarkably concise — yet sufficiently full for any practical purpose. The prosodial rules at the beginning are easily comprehended, and thus placed, are easily applied in the further progress of the scholar. A great many useless things to be found in a majority of grammars are judiciously discarded, and lastly, the analytical and synthetical exercises are admirably suited to the illustration of the principles inculcated. Upon the whole, were we a teacher, we would prefer its use to that of any other Latin Grammar whatever.

 


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Notes:

None.


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[S:1 - JAHCW, 1902] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Editions - The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe (J. A. Harrison) (Review of A New and Compendious Latin Grammar)