Edgar Allan Poe — “Hop-Frog”


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Commentary:

Characters:

  • (narrator) - Under development.

Setting:

Location - Under development.

Date - Under development.

Summary:

Under development.


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Reading and Reference Texts:

Reading copy:

  • “Hop-Frog” — reading copy

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Historical Texts:

Manuscripts and Authorized Printings:

  • Text-01 — “Hop-Frog: or, the Eight Chained Ourang-Outangs” — 1849, no original manuscript or fragments are known to exist (but this version is presumably recorded in Text-02)
  • Text-02 — “Hop-Frog: or, the Eight Chained Ourang-Outangs” — March 17, 1849 — Flag of Our Union — (Mabbott text A)
  • Text-03 — “Hop-Frog” — 1850 — WORKS — (Mabbott text B)  (This is Mabbott’s copy-text)

 

Reprints:

  • “Hop-Frog” — 1852 — Tales and Sketches: to which is added The Raven: A Poem, London, George Routledge & Co.
  • “Hop Frog” — April 23, 1858 — Vermon Patriot and State Gazette (noted as “published every Friday morning at Montpelier, VT., by Charles G. Eastman”) (back page)  (sold on eBay, Nov. 9, 2005)
  • “Hop Frog” — 1867 — Prose Tales of Edgar Allan Poe, second series (New York: W. J. Widdleton), pp. 159-168 (This collection is extracted from the 1850-1856 edition of Poe’s Works. It was reprinted several times.)
  • “Hop Frog” — 1874 — Works of Edgar A. Poe, edited by J. H. Ingram (vol. II, pp. 374-384) (This collection was subsequently reprinted in various forms)

 

Scholarly and Noteworthy Reprints:

  • “Hop-Frog” — 1894-1895 — The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, vol. 1: Tales, ed. G. E. Woodberry and E. C. Stedman, Chicago: Stone and Kimball (1:330-343)
  • Hop-Frog” — 1902 — The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe, vol. 6: Tales V, ed. J. A. Harrison, New York: T. Y. Crowell (6:216-228, and 6:296)
  • Hop-Frog” — 1978 — The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe, vol. 3: Tales & Sketches II, ed. T. O. Mabbott, Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press (3:1343-1357)
  • “Hop-Frog” — 1984 — Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Tales, Patrick F. Quinn (New York: Library of America), pp. 899-908

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Comparative Texts:

Instream Comparative Texts:

  • None.

 

Plain Text Files for Juxta:

  • None.

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Associated Material and Special Versions:

Miscellaneous Texts and Related Items:

  • “Grenouille” — (French translation by William L. Hughes)
  • “Grenouille” — December 23-24, 1855 — Le Mousquetaire
    • “Grenouille” — Part I — December 23, 1855
    • “Grenouille” — Part II — December 24, 1855
  • “Grenouille” — 1885 — Oeuvres Choisies d‘Edgar Pöe, Paris: A. Hennuyer
  • “Hop-Frog” — (French translation by Charles Baudelaire)
    • “Hop-Frog” — February 23-25, 1855 — Le Pays
      • “Hop-Frog” — Part I — February 23, 1855
      • “Hop-Frog” — Part II — February 24, 1855
      • “Hop-Frog” — Part III — February 25, 1855
    • “Hop-Frog” — 1857 — Nouvelles histoires par Edgar Poe, Paris: Michel Lévy frères
  • “Kikkersprong” — about 1930 — Fantastische Vertellingen van Edgar Allan Poe, Haarlem: H. D. Tjeenk Willink & Zoon (Dutch translation by Machiel Elias Barentz, with elaborate illustrations by Albert Hahn, somewhat reminiscent of those by Harry Clarke)
  • “Hop-Frog” — February 1954 — Nightmare (number 11)  (a comic-book)
  • “Aksak Kurbag(a” — 1955 — Altin Böcek [Golden Beetle], Varlik edition, Istanbul (Turkish translation) (the small softbound book has 109 pages. It features “The Gold-Bug” but includes seven other tales.)
  • “Hop-Frog” — October 27, 1998 — a radio show broadcast on the NPR Playhouse show, noted as Generations Readio Theater. (As was often the case with dramatic presentations of Poe’s works, the story has been modified.) The show was produced by Winnie Waldron and Winifred Phillips. It debuted on XM Satellite Radio on August 16, 2003.
  • “Hop-Frog” — 2010 — Audio book, read by Chris Aruffo

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Bibliography:

  • Bachinger, Katrina, “Together (or Not Together) Against Tyranny: Poe, Byron, and Napoleon Upside Down in ‘Hop-Frog’,” Texas Studies in Language and Literature (1991), 33:373-404.
  • Bryant, John, “Poe’s Ape of UnReason: Humor, Ritual, and Culture,” Nineteenth-Century Literature, June 1996, 51:16-52
  • Clements, Ruth L., “On a Merry-Go-Round Named Denial: Crticis, ‘Hop-Frog,’ and Poe,” Masques, Mysteries, and Mastodons: A Poe Miscellany, ed. Benjamin F. Fisher, Baltimore: Edgar Allan Poe Society, 2006, pp. 145-154
  • Comeau, Robert C., “Reading Poe on Salary: Mark Twain’s Use of ‘The Raven,’ ‘Hop-Frog,’ and ‘William Wilson’ in ‘The Facts concerning the Recent Carnival of Crime in Connecticut,” Southern Literary Journal, Fall 1996, 29:26-34
  • Gottesman, Ronald, “ ‘Hop-Frog’ and the American Nightmare,” Masques, Mysteries, and Mastodons: A Poe Miscellany, ed. Benjamin F. Fisher, Baltimore: Edgar Allan Poe Society, 2006, pp. 133-144
  • Heartman, Charles F. and James R. Canny, A Bibliography of First Printings of the Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Hattiesburg, MS: The Book Farm, 1943.
  • Houk, Annelle S. and Carlotta L. Bogart, eds., “ ‘Hop-Frog’,” Understanding the Short Story, New York: Odyessy Press, 1969, pp. 31-41.
  • Lucas, Mary, “Poe’s Theatre: ‘King Pest’ and ‘Hop-Frog’,” Journal of the Short Story in English (1990), 14:25-40.
  • Mabbott, Thomas Ollive, ed., The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe (Vols 2-3 Tales and Sketches), Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1978.
  • Martin, Bruce K., “Poe’s ‘Hop-Frog’ and the Retreat from Comedy,” Studies in Short Fiction (1973), 10:288-290.
  • Mooney, Stephen L., “The Comic in Poe’s Fiction,” American Literature, January 1962, 33:433-441.
  • Pauly, Thomas H., “ ‘Hop-Frog’ — Is the Last Laugh Best?,” Studies in Short Fiction (1974), 11:307-309.
  • Wyllie, John Cooke, “A List of the Texts of Poe’s Tales,” Humanistic Studies in Honor of John Calvin Metcalf, Charlottesville: University of Virginia, 1941, pp. 322-338.

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[S:0 - JAS] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - Tales - Hop-Frog