Text: Edgar Allan Poe, “Literary Theft,” Columbia Spy, vol. 15, no. 14, July 31, 1844, p. 2, col. 4


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[page 2, bottom of column 4:]

LITERARY THEFT. — The tale called “My First Love,” in the July number of Blackwood, just received, is a literal translation from the German of Seatsfield, who probably stole it from the pages of some of our magazines. The career of American literature is singular. It first makes its appearance in this country, without exciting much attention; it is then translated into German, and published as original, where it acquires considerable reputation; next we see it translated back to English, by the writers for Blackwood; and finally it is published in this country as something quite extraordinary. Like wine, it is supposed to improve by crossing the sea. This Seatsfield, for instance, who has been talked of so much, appears to be a mere bookseller’s hack, employed to translate from American works, which are passed off as his own. His levies have been made chiefly upon the novels of Mr. Simms, of South Carolina, the tales of Judge Hall, of Cincinnati, and Graham’s and Godey’s Magazines.

 


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Notes:

This brief article was tentatively attributed to Poe by Spannuth and Mabbott, Doings of Gotham, p. 111.

 

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[S:1 - CS, 1844] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - Misc. - Literary Theft