Text: John Ward Ostrom, “Letters: Notes to Letters 174-332,” The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe — Vol. II: 1846-1849 (1966), pp. 505-545 (This material is protected by copyright)


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


[page 505, continued:]

**[[begin Section VI]]**

174. Source: original MS. (2 pp.) in the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore. Reproduced in facsimile in Quinn and Hart, facing p. 20. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885), pp. 201-204. The year was lacking, but it has been established by Letter 175. The envelope is directed to Mrs. Maria Clemm (street address cut out), Philadelphia; cancelled at New York, April 7. Poe’s autograph is lacking; the excision also carried away completely three half-lines and part of the letters of a fourth; portions of the MS. are damaged by holes and tears. The extent of emendations by various biographers is at times misleading, owing to the lining of the printed letter.

175. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Harvard College , Library. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885), pp. 208-209. [page 506:] The letter was endorsed by Lowell, “E.A.Poe / 28th May-1844.” Poe is replying to Lowell’s letter, ca. May 23, 1844 (unlocated).

176. Source: the fragment printed in the New York Times, Magazine Section, p. 14, January 2.8, 1917; a less full printing appeared in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, January 25, 1917, item 48, with the following variants: in line 3, next “Opal”; line 7, Mr. Willis’; line 8, to state,; line 9, I am as usual, . The present location of the original MS. is unknown. Though the above fragment is unsigned, it was printed by the Times and the Anderson Galleries as a genuine Poe item. There seems to be no reason to doubt its authenticity. Mrs. Hale replied May 30 (?) (unlocated).

177. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Huntington Library (HM 21875). The letter was first printed in facsimile in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, January 25-6, 1917, frontispiece; see also the New York Times, Magazine Section, January 28, 1917, p. 14. Poe is replying to Mrs. Hale’s letter of May 30 ?, which replied to Poe’s of May 29 (Letter 176).

178. Source: clipping from the Philadelphia Ledger, January 12, 1912 (no p.), in Ingram’s unpublished MS. revision of his Life of Poe, in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia. The letter was first printed in the Ledger. The above note was added by Poe to his June 4, 1844, news-letter from Gotham, which was printed in the Columbia (Pennsylvania) Spy, June 8. The original MS. is unlocated. No reply from Bowen is known.

179. Source: photostat of original MS. (4 pp.) in the Harvard College Library. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885), pp. 211-214. The envelope is addressed to James Russell Lowell, Elmwood, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and was postmarked at New York, July 3. The MS. shows numerous changes and careted additions due to afterthought. Poe is replying to Lowell’s letter of June 27, 1844 (unlocated; but printed in W, II, 87-89).

180. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24212). The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, LXV (January 1903), 441-442. The MS. is badly ink-stained, and the bracketed emendations indicate the illegible letters or words. The letter is definitely to Chivers, who wrote Poe, August 6, 1844: “Your beautiful, friendly, abstruse, and transcendental letter of July the 10th in answer to mine of June the 15th . . .” Chivers’ letter of June 15 is in the Boston Public Library.

Chivers has written four letters since Poe’s last reply (see the notes to Letter 140): September 26, 1842 (H, XVII, 119-120); December 7, 1842 (Century Magazine, LXV (January 1903), 440-441, the full date given on page 56 of the Miller-Townsend Scrapbook of Dr. Thomas H. Chivers — a collection of letters, news clippings, and so on in the Alderman Library, University of Virginia; the Scrapbook also states that the letter was written soon after the death of Chivers’ daughter); May-June 1843 (cited in Chivers to’ Poe, June 15, 1844, where he says, “When I wrote to you last, I believe it was strawberry-time . . . I have just been eating strawberries and honey” — see H, XVII, 171, where the letter is incorrectly dated; the MS. letter shows a postmark of Washington, Georgia, June 15, and Poe to Chivers, July 10, and Chivers to Poe, August 6, 1844, both speak of it as June 15); and June 15, [page 507:] 1844 (H, XVII, pp. 170-173, under wrong date, see above), which asks for details concerning a Poe-Chivers partnership in publishing the Penn (Stylus).

181. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Harvard College Library. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885), pp. 215-216. Lowell’s endorsement: “E.A.Poe / 18th Aug. 1844” and the content of Lowell to Poe, September 27, 1844 (W, II, 100), identify Poe’s correspondent.

182. Source: letter printed in W, II, 98-100. The original MS. is unlocated, but is listed for sale as a 2-page quarto in Bangs and Company catalogue, April 11, 1896, item 102. The letter was first printed by Woodberry in the Century Magazine, XLVIII (October 1894), 863. This is Poe’s first known letter to Thomas since March 16, 1843, but Thomas, meanwhile, wrote two: March 27, 1843 (MS. in the Boston Public Library; printed in H, XVII, 140-141) and September 2, 1844, posted at Washington, September 2, directed to Philadelphia, forwarded to New York, September 4 (MS. in the Boston Public Library; unpublished).

183. Source: photostat of a copy of the original MS. (unlocated) in the hand of Maria Clemm, now in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in H, XVII, 190. At the top of the MS.-copy appears: “Copy of a letter sent to Mr, Craig. Oct. 25. mailed by me.” At first Mrs. Clemm wrote “Nov.”; then smudged the entry and wrote over it, “Oct.” The notation is signed, “Maria Clemm.” Poe is replying to a letter from Craig, datable ante October 24, 1844; which is unlocated.

184. Source: Photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Pennsylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885 ), pp. 204-205. Poe is answering Duane’s letter of October 15, 1844, which is unlocated.

185. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Harvard College Library. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885), pp. 216-218. Lowell’s endorsement: “E. A. Poe / 28th Oct. 1844” and the content of the letter identify Poe’s correspondent. Poe is replying to Lowell’s letter of September 27, 1844 (MS. in the New York Public Library; printed in W, II, 100). This is Poe’s last known letter to Lowell. However, Lowell wrote one more, December 12, 1844 (W, II, 106-108), providing Poe a means of introduction to Lowell’s friend, Charles F. Briggs, then about to start the Broadway Journal.

186. Source: photostat of original draft (7 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 21870. The letter was first printed by Woodberry in the Century Magazine, XLVIII (October 1894), 855-857, as a clean copy, not as a draft with Poe’s corrections. The letter is here first printed as it was originally written. The original MS. is undated; biographers, with one exception, have followed Woodberry’s dating of June 1844; Quinn (Poe, p. 426) questions the dating. Woodberry (11, 79) credits his source to the Griswold MSS., and he was obviously following the original draft, as a collation will show; it was then probably part of the Griswold MSS., which were subsequently dispersed, a large portion going to the Boston Public Library, the rest to various collections. The MS. is unsigned, though clearly Poe’s, and has no writing on the [page 508:] verso of the leaves. Anthon’s letter to Poe, November 2, 1844 (original in the Boston Public Library), is an answer to the above draft, which indicates that Poe later sent a clean copy; moreover, the contents of Anthon’s reply prove the fact: “I have called upon the Harpers, as you requested . . . they have retained . . . the letter which you sent me.” Thus Poe’s letter to Anthon was written probably late in October 1844, and destroyed by “the Harpers.” (For Anthon’s letter to Poe, see Quinn, Poe, p. 427.) In the above draft, matter between daggers indicates Poe’s deletions in the MS. **[[add missing parenthesis in the first line after the Huntington code]**

187. Source: fragment as first printed by Graham in an open letter to Willis, entitled “The Late Edgar Allan Poe,” in Graham’s, March 1850. The original MS. is unlocated. According to Graham, Poe wrote the letter, from which the above fragment is taken, long after Poe left Philadelphia and after Graham, at Poe’s request, returned the unpublished MS. of “The Gold Bug.” Since Poe won the Dollar Newspaper prize in June 1843, nearly 10 months prior to his leaving Philadelphia in April 1844, the letter must have been written later than April 1844. Moreover, since Poe included a lengthy criticism, equal to about four and one-half to five pages of Graham’s, of Longfellow’s Spanish Student in his “American Drama” in the American Whig Review, August 1845, it is probable that the present letter was written before this date, for the Whig Review article undoubtedly contained the original criticism of the Spanish Student, either in its entirety or in revision for the article at hand, and Poe probably did not make use of the material until either Graham returned the MS. to him or Poe despaired of its ever being published in Graham’s. Thus the letter may conjecturally be dated between April 1844, and August 1845, with allowance for the time during which the article on the drama lay in the Whig office. In an effort for a more specific dating, “early 1845” is given. **[[I redate this letter as September-October 1843, move and leave a redirecting note as reference]]**

188. Source: letter as first printed in full in Quinn, Poe, p. 420, from a copy of original MS. then in possession of Mrs. Thomas F. Madigan; the present location of the MS. is unknown. Libbie catalogue, April 24-25, 1895, item 648, lists the MS. for sale and says it has an outer envelope, is postmarked, and is a quarto MS. No reply from Bush is known.

189. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 21866). The letter was first printed in Quinn, Poe, p. 435. Poe is replying to Thomas’ letters of October 10 and December 10, 1844 (MSS. in the Boston Public Library; unpublished).

190. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in Griswold’s “Preface” to the Literati (1850; see Note 111), with the introductory “Confidential” deleted; Griswold also crossed out the word on the holograph. Poe is answering Griswold’s letter of January 14, 1845 (original in the Boston Public Library). The letter is directed to “Rufus W. Griswold / Present,” but bears postal mark of January 17. Harrison (XVII, 196) prints from the “Preface” a letter from Poe to Griswold, dated January 10, 1845, and also, p. 197, a reply from Griswold, dated January 11; the first is a completely forged letter by Griswold to prepare for the January 11 letter, also partly forged, the first sentence being [page 509:] largely the first sentence of the genuine letter of January 14, and the second sentence being wholly spurious. Poe’s letter of January 16 — in tone, contents, and manner — supports the fact that the January 10 letter was never written by him. (For supplementary treatment of these letters, with parallel printings, see Quinn, Poe, 443-446)

191. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Pennsylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885), pp. 205-206. Poe is answering Duane’s letter of ante January 28, 1845, which is unlocated.

**[[Begin section VII]]**

192. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Morgan Library. The letter was first printed in an unidentified newspaper clipping, reprinted in H,1, 218. The year is certainly 1845; the month date probably February 3, since the corrected lines in the letter were incorporated in the printing of the poem in the New York Tribune, February 4 (see The Raven and Other Poems, ed. Mabbott, pp. xxv-xxvi). The letter was not mailed but delivered by hand; on the cover appears: “J. Augustus Shea Esqr/ To be delivered as soon as he / comes in.”

193. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in H, XVII, 200-201 (with Griswold’s manipulation of the letter PP201-202) ; Quinn, Poe, pp. 446-448 gives parallel printings of the two forms, and a facsimile of the original. The letter is addressed to Rev. Rufus W. Griswold, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and posted February 25. Griswold printed his manipulated form of the letter in his “Preface,” p. xxii, with the statement that this letter was Poe’s next after that of January 10, 1845; but the January letter was forged and the statement covered his not printing Poe’s letter of January 16 (Letter 190).

194. Source: letter printed under “Correspondence” in the Broadway Journal, I (March 8, 1845), 159. The original MS. is probably lost. The date of the letter is taken from the issue of the Broadway Journal in which it appeared. Though the letter is not strictly a personal one, it is here reprinted to make it more accessible.

195. Source: photostat of original (3 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24213). The letter was first printed by Woodberry in the Century Magazine, LXV (February 1903), 550. The MS. has a torn portion in the postscript.

196. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in H, XVII, 202-203; it was previously printed in manipulated form by Griswold in his “Preface,” pp. xxii, and this forgery was reprinted in H, XVII, 169-170; the genuine and forged letters are printed in parallel columns by Quinn, Poe, pp. 449-450. The envelope was cancelled at New York, April 19. The lecture establishes the year as 1845 (see the note to Letter 193 for the date of publication of Griswold’s Poets and Poetry of America; see also the note to Letter 195 for the date of the lecture in New York). If a letter from Griswold accompanied the proof, its location is unknown; moreover, there is no evidence that Griswold replied to Poe’s question about alteration. [page 510:]

197. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 pp.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, XLVIII (October 1894), 863. The envelope is directed to F. W. Thomas, Washington City, and postmarked at New York, May 4; Thomas endorsed the envelope: “Recd May 5. 1845.” Poe is replying to at least two letters from Thomas, written between January 5 and May 3 (unlocated).

198. Source: photostat of the original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed, in facsimile, in the American Art Association catalogue, December 16-17, 19 29, item 285, facing page 68. The envelope is addressed: “F. W. Thomas Esqr / Washington D. C.” and postmarked at New York, May 15. On the envelope Thomas noted: “And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the Wilderness, even so must the son of man be lifted up, That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life — John III. 14 15.” He also noted on envelope: “Recd May 18, 1845.” Poe is answering Thomas’ letter of May 12, 1845 (MS. in the Boston Public Library; unpublished; in which Thomas says the secret writing is sent at the request of C. S. Frailey).

199. Source: photostat of the original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in the American Art Association catalogue, November 13-14, 1935, item 299, without salutation or close. Poe’s letter to Keese, June 9 [1845], the year being established by the reference to the Broadway Journal, serves to establish the year date of the present letter, which is addressed to “Mr John Keese/ 254 Pearl Street.” and is postmarked “City Despatch Post, May 27, 9 oclock.” Poe is replying to Keese’s letter of May 24, 1845, which is unlocated.

200. Source: photostat of the original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter is here first printed. The year date is established by the reference to the Broadway Journal (see also Letter 199 and notes).

201. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 8, with a wrong date. Harrison (XVII, 222) dates it “[Nov. 13? 1845]”; Woodberry (II, 157) suggests late summer, 1845; Quinn (Poe, p. 493), though using the original MS., gives “[Nov. 13? 1845?].” With the year date established by the reference to the Broadway Journal, what seems to be the month date is supported by “June 26” which is entered in pencil on the original MS., and which was first noticed by Thomas O. Mabbott, who recorded the fact in his edition of The Raven and Other Poems, p. xii. Misdatings of the letter have probably been due to the “Nov. 13, 1845?” entered on the mounting of the MS. The envelope is addressed: “E. A. Duyckinck Esqr/ 20 Clinton Place / 8th St.” Contributory evidence to the acceptance of the above dating for the letter is to be found in the similar tone of despondency cited in Mrs. Lynch’s letter to Poe, June 27, 1845 (see Letter 237; Mrs. Lynch’s letter, without date, is printed in H, XVII, 258-259); also, in June 1845 Poe had a third interest or [page 511:] share in the Broadway Journal, but in November he was full owner (see Letter 211 and note).

The Poe-Duyckinck correspondence, which must have contained many more items than are extant, is unique. Thirteen (possibly 14) Poe MSS. are at present extant or are known to have been extant, but not one Duyckinck MS. is known to exist, and only one letter from Duyckinck is definitely cited by Poe. Heretofore, only 11 letters by Poe were known; the present edition includes 3 others, 2 from dealers’ sales catalogues and 1 from a private collection. In the list below, the new items are indicated by asterisks.

Poe to DuyckinckDuyckinck to Poe

June 26

1845 September 10

1845 September 10

September 11

November 13

1845 December 10

1845 ———

1846 January 8

* 1846January 30

April 28

1846 June 29

1846 December 24

1849 February 16

1849 March 8

202. Source: letter as printed in H, XVII, 250-251, from the Philadelphia Spirit of the Times, XVI, No. 164 (July 10, 1846), p. 1, cols. 4-6, where it was first published. No original MS. of the letter is known. It is undated, but elicited Thomas’ reply of July 5, 1845 (see H, XVII, 251). Poe’s note is difficult to date; if actually written and sent, it probably reached Thomas after June 27, the date on which, according to his letter to Poe, he saw the person “from whom the report [of forgery] originated,” though it may have been written earlier. Thomas’ letter contains no reference to the receipt of Poe’s note.

203. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Enoch Pratt Library, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in W, II, 373-374. The MS. is a one leaf quarto, with the letter on page 1 and the address: “Neilson Poe Esq./ Baltimore/ Md.” on page 4; the letter was postmarked at New York, August 8. Poe is replying to Neilson Poe’s letter of July (?), 1845, which is unlocated. [page 512:]

204. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Bradley Martin collection, New York. The letter was first printed, in facsimile, on the cover of the rare William E. Benjamin catalogue, No. 30, April, 18 go; one of these catalogues is now in the American Antiquarian Society library, Worcester, Massachusetts. Poe is replying to a note from Field, ca. July 15, 1845, which is unlocated.

205. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Huntington Library (HM 21863). The letter was first printed in the New York Observer, April 26, 1900, p. 528. The MS. is badly ink-stained from some composition written by Chivers on both recto and verso of the leaf; the postscript is especially illegible, but a collation with James Grant Wilson’s printing of the letter in the Observer provides the above restoration. Both Wilson and the contents of the letter establish Chivers as the “Friend.” Chivers has written Poe three letters since Poe’s last reply, thirteen months before: August 6, 1844 (see H, XVII, pp. 184-186), September 24, 1844 (see H, XVII, 188-190), and ante August 11, 1845 (see Chivers to Poe, September 9, 1845, in H, XVII, 210-215).

206. Source: Anderson Galleries catalogue, December 7-8, 1909 (part 2), item 1316, pp. 190-191, where it was first printed. The MS. letter is cited as a 2 page quarto, bearing “the scarce 2 cents green Boyd’s City Express” stamp, but its present location is unknown. The Osborn letter, which Poe is answering and which accompanied the Poe MS. letter at the sale, was written from 219 Eighth Avenue [New York], and was dated August 14, 1845.

207. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24214). The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, LXV (February 1903), 545-546 The year date is established by Chivers’ letter to Poe, September 9,1845: “I have just received your letter, dated the 29th of August (see H, XVII, 210-215) ; the “Friend” is identified by Chivers’ letter, just cited, and by the contents of the present one. Poe is replying to Chivers’ letter of August 25, 1845, which is unlocated.

208. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 7. On the mounting of the MS., in an unknown hand, is written: “Sept. 10, 1845?”; the date is established by the appearance of the cited poetic passages in The Raven and Other Poems, printed by November 12, actually published November 12, and first reviewed in the Evening Mirror, November 26, 1845 (see The Raven and Other Poems, ed. Mabbott, pp. xi and xiv, and passim). In this connection, see also Letter 210.

209. Source: letter as first printed in The Raven and Other Poems, ed. Mabbott, p. vii, from a copy in the New York Public Library. The original MS. (unlocated) was offered for sale in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, May 15, 1922, item 512, as an a.l.s., 1 p. octavo, n.d. The date of the present letter was suggested by Mabbott, in his edition of The Raven, and in its plausible relation to Poe’s letter of September 10 and in the absence of any contradictory evidence in the Poe-Duyckinck correspondence seems justifiable. [page 513:]

210. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed by T. O. Mabbott in his “Introduction” to his edition of The Raven and Other Poems, p. viii. Someone docketed the MS. with “[1845?].” The envelope was cancelled in New York, September 29, and was addressed to Griswold in Philadelphia. Poe’s letter to Duyckinck (Letter 208), dated only “Wednesday 10th,” belongs certainly to 1845, for The Raven volume was published November 19, 1845; therefore this letter to Griswold belongs to 1845. Since “Wednesday 10th” in 1845 fell only in September and December, the Duyckinck letter can be dated Wednesday 10th [September, 1845], and the Griswold letter, September 28 [1845], Since Griswold was living in Philadelphia in 1845, the contents of Poe’s letter suggest either a conference with Griswold during one of his visits to New York, or an earlier letter from Poe, for which there is no other evidence.

211. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in Griswold’s “Preface,” p. xxii, but without the postscript; H, XVII, 216, reprinted from the “Preface.” The envelope is directed to Dr. Rufus W. Griswold, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and cancelled at New York, October 27. Harrison (XVII, 220-221) also prints a letter from Poe to Griswold, dated November 1, 1845, which thanks Griswold for sending $25 with a promise of $25 more, and which implies a letter from Griswold. The “Preface,” p. xxii, prints the November 1 letter, but it is undoubtedly spurious, since the “Preface” is the sole authority. Moreover, had it been sent with the money, Poe would probably have published the “article about you [Griswold]” in the Broadway Journal, as the letter implies, but the magazine has no such article after the date of the letter.

212. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in full in the American Art Association catalogue (4201), November 13-14, 1935, item 300, with facsimile facing p. 188. The envelope is postmarked at New York, October 27, and is addressed to “Mrs. S. J. Hale / Philadelphia / Pa.” Poe is replying to Mrs. Hale’s letter of October 15-16 (?), which is unlocated.

213. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Peabody Institute Library. The letter was first printed in H, XVII, 217, This is the last known letter from Poe to Kennedy; the last known one from Kennedy is dated December 1, 1845 (MS. in the Boston Public Library; printed in H, XVII, 224-225).

214. Source: photostat of original fragment (1 p.) in the Wrenn Library of the University of Texas. The letter was first printed in the Literary Review, March 5, 1921, p. 14; but neither place, date, nor signature is given. Reference to the Broadway Journal fixes the place and year, and “late October” is suggested by his lecture engagement before the Boston Lyceum, October 16 (Quinn, Poe, p, 485), and by the press of business incident to his taking over the control of the Broadway Journal, October 24, 1845 (Quinn, Poe, pp. 752-753; see also Letter 212). Though the letter is unsigned, the handwriting is definitely Poe’s. The original letter seems to have been a small single leaf, folded once, the message being written on page 1, the lower portion [page 514:] of which has been removed. The message may have been continued on the verso of page 1, though there are no ink marks to support this contention, or on page 3 with the address on the verso of page 3, but the original pages 3 and 4 have been torn off.

215. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 7-8. On the mounting of the letter, in an unknown hand, appears: “Nov. 13, 1845”; since the thirteenth fell on Thursday only in February, March, and November in 1845, the November dating is corroborated by the reference to the Tales, which had been published in June of that year. The envelope is addressed: “Evert A. Duyckinck Esqr./ 20 Clinton Place.” No reply to the present letter is known.

216. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24215). The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, LXV (February 1903), 546-547. The identity of Chivers as the “Friend” is established by Chivers’ letters to Poe, September 9 (H, XVII, 210-215, concerning the “Florida bank” and the “broken money”), and October 30, 184 5 (H, XVII, 217-220, concerning the pronunciation of Archytus). Chivers has written two letters (others are suggested) since Poe’s last letter of August 29, 1845: one, September 9; the other, October 30, 1845, both cited in this letter of Poe’s.

217. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Enoch Pratt Library, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in H, XVII, 223-224. The envelope (page 4 of a folded leaf) is addressed to “George Poe Jr Esqr / (late of Mobile) / Georgetown / D. C.” and is postmarked at New York, December 1. George Poe endorsed the letter: “Edgar A. Poe / 30th Nov 1845 / recd 3 Decr / [blot, probably “not”] ans.” The holograph has been cut off at the bottom of page 1, though probably not more than one line and the signature are missing. This is the last known letter from Poe to George Poe, and no reply is known.

218. Source: photostat of original anastatic letter in the Library of Congress. Reproduced in facsimile in The South in the Building of the Nation, vol. XII, facing p. 294, where it was first printed, from the anastatic letter to Watterston, now in the Library of Congress, for, according to St. George L. Sioussat, chief of the Division of Manuscripts, the facsimile carries the pressmark once used by the Division. The letter was addressed to “Geo. Watterston Esqr./ Washington/ D.C.,” and was postmarked at New York, December 2. Mr. Sioussat states that the address appears on page 4 of the folded leaf, and that the inner two pages are blank. No letter from Watterston to Poe is known.

The Watterston letter (in volume II of the Watterston Papers, in the Library of Congress) is but one of several which were made from some facsimile copying process, or from anastatic printing (see Poe’s article, “Anastatic Printing,” reprinted in H, XIV, 153-159); the original letter from which the printing was done is undoubtedly lost. There are at least four of these circular letters extant, each carrying a different address. Besides the Watterston [page 515:] letter, there is one in the Huntington Library, addressed to “Wm. Green Esq./ Culpepper C. H./ Va.” and postmarked New York, December 8; it differs from the Watterston letter only in having a silverfish hole in the lower right portion of the text. Another is in the Pierpont Morgan Library, addressed to Charles Campbell, Petersburg, Virginia, and postmarked New York, December 5. Still another is reproduced in John W. Robertson’s Edgar A. Poe: A Psychopathic Study, facing page 324; this letter differs from the others in having only one dot after the “A” in the signature, and no period after the “Poe”; thus it is a fourth letter, though Robertson gives no address or postmark, unless his reproduction of it is from a retouched plate. All the above letters are alike in wording, lining, and dating, and, except for the Robertson item, alike in punctuation; each is written on page r of a quarto leaf, and addressed on page 4 (except, again, the Robertson item, which was not available for inspection, but probably conforms to the others). It is interesting that each of the first three given differs in the postal date. No reply from any of these correspondents is known. **[[correct the date and title of the Robertson book]]**

219. Source: letter printed in James Grant Wilson’s Life and Letters of Fitz-Greene Halleck, p, 431, its first printing. The original MS. is probably lost. This is Poe’s third and last known letter to Halleck.

220. Source: fragment as first printed in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, May 27, 1914, item

208, where the letter is called an a.l.s. “Poe” to Duyckinck, and described as a quarto, dated December 10, with edges worn and stained. The MS. is unlocated. The letter undoubtedly belongs to 1845, for by December 1846, Poe and Elizabeth F. Ellett were not on friendly terms.

220a. Source: facsimile in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, January 17-18, 1928, item 369, where it is first printed. The note is described as tipped on a fly-leaf of the first volume of Poe’s Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque. Neither place, date, nor correspondent is given, but the reference to the “B. J.” (Broadway Journal) almost certainly identifies the year as 1845. The correspondent may very well have been Evert A. Duyckinck, who was associated with Wiley and Putnam, New York publishers. He selected the stories for Poe’s 1845 edition of Tales, published in June. The original MS. (probably 1 page) is unlocated. No reply to the present letter is known.

220b. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the collection of Miss Helen Ingersoll Tetlow, but now on deposit in the Longfellow House, Cambridge. The letter is here first printed. The MS. is a small folded sheet, with the letter on page 1 and is addressed on page 4 to “Mr. W. M. Gillespie / 30 Dey St.” Reference to the Broadway journal dates the letter 1845; the month-date must remain uncertain, though late spring is possible. No other letters to Gillespie are known, but Gillespie wrote to Poe, March 1, 1845 (original in Boston Public Library). If Poe was answering a letter from Gillespie, it is unlocated.

221. Source: original fragment in the Alderman Library, University of Virginia. The fragment appears to be middle section of original letter. Neither the correspondent’s name nor the date is given. The tone of the letter suggests 1845-1846. [page 516:]

**[[begin section VIII]]**

222. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the Valentine Museum, Richmond. The letter was first printed in W, II, 374. Poe is replying to Percival’s letter of December 19, 1845, in which Percival sent a cipher for solution; the present location of the Percival original is unknown, but it was announced for sale in the Bangs and Company catalogue, April 11, 1896, item 113 1/2.

223. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was fast printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 8. The envelope, not mailed, is addressed: “Evert A. Duyckinck Esqr.”

224. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter is here first printed. The letter must be dated 1846, for Saturday, January 10, fell only in that year during Poe’s New York period and his visits to Anne Lynch’s soirees. The letter came to light recently, attached to the flyleaf of a copy of the Museum, volume XL, Philadelphia, 1840. The present letter was written on Poe’s own letter paper, embossed with his initials “E A P.”

224a. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter is here first printed. The year date is established by an almost identical letter written by Poe to Fitz-Greene Halleck of the same date (see Letter 224 and Note 224). Like the letter paper to Halleck, the present item carries the blind embossing “E A P” in the upper left corner of the MS. The correspondence appears on page 1 of a folded sheet of note paper; on page 4 appears: “C. Edwards Lester Esqr / Present.”

225. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24216). The letter is here first printed in full. Poe is replying to Mrs. Hale’s letter of November 14, which is unlocated.

226. Source: original MS. fragment (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter is here first printed. The top third of the holograph has been cut off, and some ten lines are missing. The fragment lacks address and postmark, but seems genuine. Though the correspondent’s name is missing, the content of the letter suggests Evert A. Duyckinck as the recipient: for he was editor of Poe’s Tales of 1845, published by Wiley and Putnam; and though Martin F. Tupper’s review of the Tales did not appear in the Literary Gazette (London) until January 31, 1846, a letter from Tupper to Mr. Wiley late in 1845 asking, “Shall we make Edgar Poe famous by a notice in the Literary Gazette” (see P, II, 1021), would have given Poe’s publisher and editor the information Poe solicits in the present letter. Moreover, Poe often sent letters to Duyckinck by Mrs. Clemm. Finally, Duyckinck would probably have been able to furnish Poe with the data about the writers cited in the present letter. Thus, with some reservation, this letter is assigned to the Poe-Duyckinck correspondence. The letter is undated in full; but 1846 is given to it on the basis of the above external evidence relative to the publication of the Tales and the Tupper review and letter to Wiley concerning it. Furthermore, Poe lived at 85 Amity Street from October 1, 1845 (see the note to Letter 215) to sometime early in 1846 (see Letter 227). Why Poe did not know the addresses of many of the men listed in this letter and why [page 517:] he did not refer to the New York City Directory may reasonably be questioned; still, in the absence of other controverting evidence the letter is admitted to the canon as genuine. **[[MS of the Tupper letter to Wiley is at PP (Gimble).]]**

227. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Bradley Martin collection, New York. The letter is here first printed. The poem “Power of the Bards,” which appeared in Colton’s American Review, III (June 1846), 587-588, and was signed “P. P. Cooke, Virginia,” identifies the correspondent; moreover, Cooke’s reply, August 4, 1846 (original in Boston Public Library), is clearly an answer to the present letter. Poe’s reference to his having left 85 Amity Street [early in 1846] coupled with the date of Cooke’s reply, cited above, proves Poe’s own misdating of the present letter by four years. The correct year date is 1846. Cooke’s “three last letters” (unlocated) may be dated ca. January late-April early, 1846. Correspondence between Poe and William T. Porter is untraceable.

228. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. Reproduced in facsimile in the American Art Association catalogue, May 2-3, 1934 (Pt. 1), item 214. The letter was first printed in Ingram, II, 72. Poe is answering Eveleth’s letters of December 21, 1845, January 5, and April 3, 1846 (original MSS. in the New York Public Library).

Eveleth never met Poe, but while a medical student he corresponded with Poe from his home in Phillips, Maine, and from the Maine Medical School in Brunswick. In a letter dated October 1, 1878 (Ingram collection, University of Virginia), Eveleth copied his letters from Poe, as well as letters, in whole or in part, from Mrs. Clemm, Mrs. Whitman, John P. Kennedy, and others, which he had received during a correspondence with them following Poe’s death. He defended Poe against charges of intoxication in an article in the Portland (Maine) Transcript, June 8 and July 6, 1850. Numerous errors in Eveleth’s copies of the letters were carried into Ingram’s printing of them. James Southall Wilson edited Eveleth’s copies for the University of Virginia Alumni Bulletin, XVII (January 1924), 34-59 the article being reprinted as The Letters of Edgar A. Poe to George W. Eveleth (hereinafter referred to as PE (reprint) ). Thomas Ollive Mabbott edited Eveleth’s letters to Poe for the New York Public Library Bulletin, XXVI (March 1922), 171-195, the article being reprinted as The Letters of George W. Eveleth to Edgar Allan Poe (hereinafter referred to as EP (reprint) ). For a fuller treatment of the Poe-Eveleth correspondence, see the two articles cited. Since the errors in the Eveleth transcripts were unavoidably reproduced in the Ingram and Wilson printings, and continued by other writers using them as sources, the present printing, taken from photostat or facsimile copies of original MSS., is the most accurate presentation to date of the letters as Poe wrote them. Eveleth wrote Poe 13 letters, 1 of which is lost and unprinted; Poe wrote Eveleth 7 letters, all accounted for, the one cited by Wilson as “lost” (PE (reprint), p, 3) being part of the letter of January 4, 1848. The items in the Poe-Eveleth correspondence follow; the starred item is that for which no known MS. or printing has come down to the present time: [page 518:]

Eveleth to PoePoe to Eveleth

1845December 21

1846 January 5

1846 April 3

1846 April 16

1846 June 9

1846 October 13

1846 December 15

1847 January 19

1847 February 16

1847February 21

1847 March 11

1847July 27

1848 January 4

1848 January 11

1848 February 29

1848 March 9

1848 July 9

1849 February 17

1849 June 26

* 1849ante October 7

229. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 8-9. The year date seems established by “1846” noted on both the envelope and the mounting of the letter, and by Poe’s request for autographs of a number of persons who later in the year appeared in his “Literati.” The envelope was not mailed, but delivered probably by messenger, and was addressed: “Evert A. Duyckinck Esqr / Present.”

230. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, March 14-15, 1921, item 332. Accompanying this letter at the sale was a copy of a poem, “The Toilette,” by Jerome A. Maubey, to which Poe refers, and certain other “correspondence relating to it.” Items of this correspondence are unlocated. Poe is replying to Maubey’s letter, datable only ante April 28, 1846, which is unlocated.

231. Source: letter, as first printed, in Adrian H. Joline, Meditations of an Autograph Collector, p. 159. The original MS. is unlocated, but was offered for sale in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, December 15, 1914, item 832, which states the item was “. . . an a.n.s. [autograph note signed] of Edgar Allan Poe to T. Honland,” which had been inserted in a copy of Woodberry’s Life of Poe (1909); the catalogue then quotes the letter, identical with the note printed in Joline. Joline merely gives Poe’s middle initial, the above signature in full being taken from the note supplied by the Anderson catalogue. [page 519:] Honland’s request for the autograph, probably a letter, is unlocated, but may be dated ante May 25, 1846.

232. Source: copy of original MS. (probably 1 p.) sent by Mrs. Marie Louise Houghton (formerly Shew) to Ingram, now in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia; the original letter is probably lost. The letter was first printed by Ingram in Appleton’s Journal, IV (May 1878), 421. Ingram, II, 88-89, reprints the letter, and says that it was “written on a page of Poe’s rough pocket notebook paper.” Mrs. Houghton’s letter to Ingram, May 2 [1875] (in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia), says: “I sent the original [her daughter Dora kept a copy] thinking you would like to have it as he wrote it”; yet Ingram noted on the letter: “It never came. Only the copy — “ In the unpublished MS. revision of his Life of Poe (Ingram collection), he copies the letter to Virginia and says that it is taken from the “M.S.” (p. 571). Thus it would appear that Ingram at one time had the original letter in his possession. Harrison (XVII, 232) prints the letter from the Griswold collection, though it is not now there; if it was ever in the Griswold MSS. it probably was among those items that did not go to the Boston Public Library. (Intriguing is a statement by Ingram in a letter to Mrs. H. M. Thomas, July 14, 1913: “I offered three very interesting letters from Poe to the British Museum they would only buy one and only gave me £ 2. 2/ — about $10 1/2,” quoted in Pratt, p. 80. Could Poe’s letter to Virginia have been this one?) Mrs. Houghton is undoubtedly responsible for the errors in spelling and pointing in the letter. Ingram’s various printings of the letter give varying changes: in Appleton’s he has three dots after “tomorrow,” no comma after “remembrance,” a comma after “words,” and italics for “fervent prayer”; in his published Life, as in Appleton’s, he corrects the misspellings, puts a comma after “remembrance” and after “words,” italicizes “fervent prayer,” and places a caret after “tomorrow”; in his unpublished MS. he carets the space before “P.M.” Harrison follows the printing of the letter in Ingram’s Life (which may have been his source, not a letter in the Griswold MSS.). Ingram’s Life seems to have been the source of subsequent printings; however, Mrs. Houghton’s copy, which was from the original, seems to be the safer, despite its minor errors.

233. Source: photostat of original (3 pp.) in Huntington Library (HM 21872). The letter was first printed in Lillian Whiting’s Life of Kate Field, pp. 21-22. The envelope is addressed to J. M. Field, Esqr., Editor of the St. Louis Reveilé, St. Louis; postmarked at New York, June 18. There are a few torn places in the MS. This is the only known letter between Poe and Field, though Field seems to have printed one of the editorials and sent Poe a copy of the Reveilé, perhaps with a letter (see Letter 237). On the MS. brackets have been drawn around Poe’s entire editorial, beginning with paragraph three on page 2, probably by Field.

234. Source: letter as first printed in the Anderson Galleries catalogue, May 1-3, 1916, item 642, where the MS. is cited as a 1 page octavo, inlaid in a quarto sheet. According to an earlier, shorter version of the present text in Anderson Galleries catalogue, December 15, 1914, item 832, the MS. is cited [page 520:] as having no postmark. The correspondent’s name is not given. The present location of the MS. is unknown. No reply to the present letter is known.

235. Source: facsimile of original MS. (1 p.) in Current Opinion, LXX (June 1921), 823, where it was first presented in full. The original MS. is in the Huntington Library (HM 21867).

236. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 9. The year date is established by the publication of Poe’s “Reply to English” in the Philadelphia Spirit of the Times, July 10, 1846 (see H, XVII, 239-253; also Letter 237) ; and in 1846, Monday 29 fell only in June. Moreover, the mounting of the letter is docketed “June 29, x846.”

237. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, XLVIII (October 1894), 860. The envelope is addressed to Godey, as editor of the Lady’s Book, Philadelphia, and is postmarked July 16. Poe is replying to a letter from Godey, ca. July 14, 1846, which is unlocated. The present letter suggests an exchange of correspondence numbering four items: two from Poe and two from Godey, only the present letter being extant. The only evidence that Godey replied to Poe’s letter of July 16 is found in the following fact: the cover of Poe’s present letter shows on the verso the West Farms address; thus Godey reversed the cover and directed his reply to Poe at the address given in the postscript of the present letter.

The one known letter from Anne C. Lynch to Poe (see H, XVII, 258-259) has hitherto been undated or wrongly assigned to 1846. Because it refers to a “note” from Poe, it should be properly dated. In the letter Miss Lynch thanks Poe for “your very kind notice of my poems, no less than for your kind and friendly note.” In the Broadway Journal, June 21, 1845 (I, 390), accompanying her poems, appears: “The two noble poems subjoined . . . are the composition of one of our most justly distinguished poetesses — Miss Anne Charlotte Lynch . . . In modulation and force of rhythm — in dignity and loftiness of sentiment — and in terse energy and expression — they equal if they do not excel any thing of the same character written by an American. — Eds. B. J.” After telling Poe that she is about to leave New York, she adds: “I shall take the Tales with me . . . Many thanks for them.” The Tales (that is, the title page) was entered for copyright, June 13, 1845. A bookseller advertised it on June 26, Thursday. Thus the actual publication date (the day on which it was offered for sale) was probably June 25-26, and Poe would have had copies a few days in advance. Miss Lynch’s letter, dated only “Friday morning-27,” was written June 27, 1845. Thus Poe’s note to her must have been dated ca. June 25-26.

238. Source: facsimile of original (1 p.) in the Parke-Bernet Galleries catalogue (No. 248), January 15-16, 1941, item 321, where it was first printed. The location of the original MS. is not known. This is the only known letter between Poe and Bisco. Reproduced in the Parke-Bernet catalogue with the letter were four receipts, each signed “Edgar A Poe”: [page 521:] (1) “New-York: Jany: 20th 45. Recd of Mr John Bisco eighteen dollars, in full for two articles in Broadway Journal.” (2) “New-York: April 7th — 45. Received of John Bisco ten dollars, on account of the Southern Literary Messenger. 10$.” (3) “New-York: April 16-145. Received of John Bisco three dollars on a/c of Southern L. Messenger.” (4) “New-York: April 30th 1845. Received of John Bisco five dollars account of the Southern Literary Messenger.” Item (1) above refers to Poe’s critique of Elizabeth Barrett’s Drama of Exile and Other Poems which appeared in the Broadway Journal, I (January 4 and 11), 4-8, 17-20, for which apparently he received $2 per page. Concerning the other items, see Allen, Israfel, p. 521.

239. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24217). The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, LXV (February 1903), 547. The identity of Chivers as the “Friend” was established by the reference to his “Luciferian Revelation” (see Chivers to Poe, September 9, 1845, in H, XVII, 213). As Poe states, Chivers has written six letters (perhaps more), all lost, since Poe’s last, November 15, 184Chivers placed a cross after “Reveilé,” on page 3 of the MS., and then noted at the end of the letter: “The following, is the article from the Home Journal to which he refers.”

240. Source: photostat of original MS. (4 pp.) in the Berg Collection of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in H, XVII, 265-268. Pages 1 and 2 appear to have been scorched by an iron. It is clear from Poe’s allusion to “the hair-splitting of my French friend” that he is replying to Cooke’s letter of August 4, 1846 (see H, XVII, 262-264).

241. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 pp.) in the Berg collection of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in PE (reprint), pp. 7-12. Neither Ingram, who printed the letter incorrectly and incompletely from the copy sent him by Eveleth, October 1, 1878 (MS. in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia), nor Harrison, using Ingram, presents a true reading; and Wilson, using the Eveleth copy, likewise unavoidably prints the letter with the errors contained in Eveleth’s transcript. Quinn (Poe, pp. 521-524), though printing from the original Poe MS., made certain minor variations. The envelope was addressed to “G. W. Evelett Esqr./ Phillips / Maine,” and was postmarked New York, December 16. Pages 1 and 3 of the MS. are torn in several places along the right margin; the bracketed not, page 3, was written in by a strange hand at a torn place in the MS. Poe is replying to Eveleth’s letter of June 9, 1846; this letter has never been printed in full, but when the holograph was up for sale, portions of the text were printed in the Bangs and Company catalogue, April 11, 1896; P, II, 1100, reprints parts from the Bangs catalogue. Thus this June 9 letter, which thanks Poe for returning money sent him as a subscription to the Broadway Journal, is a reply to Poe’s letter of April 16, 1846, and is the “lost” item suggested by Wilson (PE (reprint), p. 3). Poe’s present letter is also replying to Eveleth’s of October 13, 1846, original MS. in the New York Public Library, and printed in EP (reprint), pp. 7-8.

242. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Manuscript Division [page 522:] of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 9-10.

243. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Library of Congress (Oliver Wendell Holmes collection). The letter was first printed in Allen, Israfel, II, 725. No reply to Poe’s letter or request is known.

244. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 10.

245. Source: facsimile of original (1 p.) in John W. Robertson’s Commentary on Edgar A. Poe, II, facing p. 234. The original MS. was then in the Robertson collection, but its present location is unknown. The letter was first printed by J. H. Whitty in the Bookman, XLIV (September 1916), 20-21. The envelope is directed to A. Ramsay, Esqr., Stonehaven, Scotland; postmarked at New York, December 30, and at Stonehaven, January 16, 1847. Poe is replying to a letter from Ramsay, dated November 30, 1846, the original MS. of which is in the Boston Public Library; printed in H, XVII, 268-269. The only other known letter in this correspondence is that of Ramsay, April 14, 1847, original MS. in Boston Public Library; printed in H, XVII, 184-285

246. Source: letter printed in the Home Journal, January 9, 1847, where it was first published. The page containing the letter from this particular issue of the Home Journal, which is very rare, is in the Ingram collection at the University of Virginia. No other issue of the Home Journal of this date was located. Though the page used shows no dating, it does indicate the title of the journal. Corroboration of the date is to be found: in Ingram’s statement (II, 100) that the letter appeared in the Home Journal (though his dating is wrong); in the appearance of Willis’ editorial, that called forth Poe’s reply, in the issue for December 26; in the fact that Poe’s letter was written too late for inclusion in the issue for January 2 and would therefore appear in that of January 9; and in a note to the effect that the letter appeared in the January 9, 1847, issue, taken by Dr. Mabbott years ago when he saw a now inaccessible issue of the Home Journal of that date. Poe is replying to a letter from Willis (MS. in the Boston Public Library), which is undated, save for “Wednesday,” but certainly belonging to December 23, 1846; on the holograph appears “Edgar A. Poe, Esq., New York City (to be called for).” Willis’ letter (printed in H, XVII, 272) enclosed the Home Journal editorial, which is reprinted in Quinn, Poe, pp. 525-526. **[[another copy of the HJ issue in question is, I think, at the Pratt library in Baltimore, a full issue with the date, etc.]]**

247. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter is here first printed in full.

248. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24221). The letter was first printed by Ingram in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, p. 421; and is reproduced in facsimile in Ingram, II, 107. Poe is probably replying to an unlocated letter from Mrs. Shew, dated January 28-29, 1847.

**[[Begin section IX]]**

249. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Berg collection of R;the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in Ingram, I, [page 523:] 167 (see also PE (reprint), pp. 12-13). The envelope is addressed to “G. W. Evelett Esqre / Phillips / Me” and postmarked “New York 17 Feb.,” page 4 of the folded leaf being used as the cover. Poe is replying to Eveleth’s letter of January 19, 1847; the original MS. of which is in the New York Public Library, and which is printed in EP (reprint), pp. 9-12.

250. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Morgan Library. The letter is here first printed in full. The envelope is directed to Horace Greeley, Esqr., Washington, D.C., but bears no postal cancellation. The “tr” in the close is scarcely decipherable and may be just a pen mark, though probably intended to represent “truly.”

251. Source: photostat of original MS. draft (3 pp.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter is reproduced in facsimile in P, II, 1215-1219, where it was first printed. No clean copy MS. is known; the original draft is unsigned and was not sent through the mail, though there is a strong presumption that Poe sent a corrected version. The printings of the letter in Ingram, II, 116

117, and in H, XVII, 280-282, are undoubtedly corrected versions by the respective editors, as collation with the above printing will show; moreover, Harrison’s citing the Griswold MS., which, as far as the Boston Public Library knows, could refer only to the draft, and the uncertainty of the nature of his printing, expressed in his footnote, tend to confirm his use of the draft. The identity of Poe’s correspondent is to be found in the last paragraph, and her letter of February 21, 1847 (wrongly dated in P, II, 1214), is unlocated.

252. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in PE (reprint), pp. 13-14; Ingram (II, 87) had printed but a small portion of the letter, even changing the proper order of the text. The envelope is addressed to “Geo. W. Evelette Esqr / Phillips / Me,” and initialed in lower left corner “E A P.”; it is postmarked New York, March 12. Poe is answering Eveleth’s letter of February 21, 1847, the original MS. of which is in the New York Public Library, and which is printed in EP (reprint), pp. 13-14

253. Source: transcript made by William Hand Browne for J. H. Ingram (now in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia). The present location of the original MS. is unknown, and it is probably lost. The letter was first printed in Ingram, II, 118. Poe is replying to a letter from Reinman and Walker, February 24, 1847, concerning which Browne wrote on verso of the transcript: “Copy of Edgar A. Poe’s letter of acceptance of honorary membership of the Philosophian Society’ of Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio. He was elected (as the Cor. Secy. informs me) Feby. 19, 1847.” The location of the Reinman and Walker letter to Poe is also unknown.

254. Source: Dora Houghton’s copy of the original MS. The copy is in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia; the original MS. is probably lost. The letter was first printed by Ingram in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, p. 422, under the date of “May, 1848”; and on Dora Houghton’s copy, he wrote “May 1848,” but later changed it to “1847.” However, in his unpublished MS. revision of his Life of Poe (in the Ingram collection), he inclines [page 524:] toward 1848. “May” is probably Ingram’s dating, but the Houghton-Ingram correspondence does not confirm it. The rather formal salutation, the reference to “months,” probably a few, the reference to Virginia’s death — all suggest 1847 instead of 1848, and the month may tentatively be given as May, since Ingram may have had justification for it. Moreover, by May 1848 Mrs. Shew (later Mrs. Roland Houghton) was breaking off her friendship with Poe, at the insistence of John H. Hopkins, Jr., then a theological student and friend of Mrs. Shew (see Letter 273 and note). Ingram’s printings of the letter omit: “I should return the money, if I did not know it would grieve you, as” and “deserving a place in a palace or church & ”; Harrison (XVII, 297), who says his source is in the Griswold collection, omits the same passages. They are, therefore, here first printed. The language of the letter suggests that Poe is replying to Mrs. Shew’s note of Saturday night, May (?), 1847, which is unlocated.

254a. Source: fragment printed in the Dodd, Mead and Company sales catalogue No. 59, March 1901, item 269, where the MS. is described as an a.l.s. of 1 page, duodecimo, addressed to Professor C. P. Bronson. No reply to the present letter is known, and the present MS. is unlocated.

255. Source: original MS. (2 pp.) in the Alderman Library, University of Virginia. The letter was first printed in H, I, 270-271. That the letter is written to Robert T. Conrad is proved by Letter 256.

256. Source: facsimile of original MS. (1 p.) in the N. A. Kovach catalogue (Los Angeles, California), September 22, 1933, p. 1, where it was first presented in full. The original MS. is unlocated.

257. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Yale University Library. The letter was first printed in Ingram, “Memoir” to The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, I, lxxxii, though he dates it “1848”; however, in Ingram, II, 127-128, it is dated 1847. The 1847 dating is established by the sonnet, “An Enigma,” referred to in the letter, and published in Sartain’s Magazine, March 1848 (see Campbell, Poems, p. 276). In his unpublished MS. revision of his Life of Poe, p. 627 c (Ingram collection, University of Virginia), Ingram says: “M.S. presented to me by Mrs. Lewis together with other letters and autograph writings by Poe.” Former printings of the present letter do not show the above deletion; who made it can scarcely be determined. There is no evidence of a postmark on the letter, though it may have been on a lost cover. Poe is replying to Mrs. Lewis’ letter of ante November 27, 1847, which is unlocated.

258. Source: letter printed in W, n, 233; the original MS. being unlocated. The letter was first printed in Woodberry (1885), p. 281, from MS. The year date is lacking, but 1847 is established by the appearance of the poem in the American Whig Review, December 1847. Willis’ “note” of “three or four weeks ago” is unlocated.

259. Source: facsimile in Quinn, Poe, pp. 536-537, of the original MS. (2 pp.) in the A. S. W. Rosenbach collection, Philadelphia. The letter was first printed in full as one letter in PE (reprint), pp. 15-19; however, the bracketed five lines following the first signature, not then known to belong [page 525:] to the present letter, were first printed by the present editor in an article, “Two ‘Lost’ Poe Letters,” American Notes and Queries, I (August 1941), 68-69. Bracketed emendations in some places are due to the state of the facsimile print used; the original MS., which was not available, is probably clear. The bracketed five lines at the end of the present letter are printed from the Anderson Galleries catalogue, January 21-24, part 2, 1929, item 934. Wilson (PE (reprint), pp. 2-3) suggested, from an Eveleth letter to J. H. Ingram, that these lines made up a separate letter, but he corrected Eveleth’s improper dating. The lines, however, turned out to be an enclosure sent with the present letter. They were written in pencil on the verso of a prospectus of the Stylus. Eveleth had given it to a friend who requested a specimen of Poe’s handwriting (see Eveleth’s letter to Ingram, October 30, 1878, in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia). Evidence that identifies these lines as the supposed “lost” letter is combined in Eveleth’s replies to Poe, January 11, March 9, and July 9, 1848 (see EP). Poe is answering Eveleth’s eighth letter, dated July 27, 1847, the original MS. of which is in the New York Public Library. (Although Poe gives the date as July 26, Eveleth’s MS. is dated “27 Tues. eve.” and is postmarked July 28.)

260. Source: letter as first printed in Ingram, II, 135. The original MS. is probably, lost.

261. Source: fragment as first printed in the American Art Association catalogue, November 23-24, 1937, item 353. The MS. is unlocated, but is cited by the catalogue as a 1 page quarto from Poe to Godey. Godey’s probable reply, unlocated, may be dated post January 17, 1848. The present letter is the last known item in the Poe-Godey correspondence, the paragraph published over Poe’s signature in Godey’s, December 1849, being a hoax.

262. Source: letter printed in Willis’ “Death of Poe,” Home Journal, October 20, 1849, p. 2, where it was first printed. The location of the original MS. is unknown, and is probably lost.

263. Source: photostat of the original MS. (2 pp.) in the Morgan Library, New York. The letter was first printed in PE (reprint), pp. 19-22; however, Wilson printed from a copy of the letter made by Eveleth for Ingram (in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia), and his printing varies in certain details with the original reading, especially in his omission of sentence twelve, page 1. The original MS. in the Morgan Library does not contain the bracketed passage following the signature-the last line of the letter, the close, and the signature all being written on the same line at the foot of the page; the ellipsis represents the long discussion of Eureka (see H, XVI, 337-346, reprinted from the Methodist Review, January 1896); thus the bracketed passage, including the addenda, began on page 3 of the letter, the original MS. of which is unlocated, though Eveleth’s copy is in the Ingram collection. Except for the addenda, the bracketed portion was first printed by Ingram, II, 141-142. Poe is replying to Eveleth’s letter of January 11, 1848, the original of which is in the New York Public Library, and printed in EP (reprint), pp. 16-18.

264. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the J. K. Lilly collection, [page 526:] Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in H, I, 277-278, without the postscript. For the letter Poe used a printed prospectus of the Stylus, dated “New York City, April, 1848”; the advertisement appears on page 1, the letter on pages 3 and 4, and the address: “George E. Irbey [Isbell] Esq / Binghampton, / Broome Co./ New-York” occupies page 2; the letter is postmarked: “New York/, Mar 3 / 5 cts.” In the salutation of the letter, an unidentified hand has struck out “Irbey” and written above, “Isbell.” The same change was not made on the envelope. Poe is replying to Isbell’s letter of February 10, 1848, which is unlocated.

265. Source: printed letter in Ingram, II, 143; the original MS. being unlocated. Ingram assigned it to 1848; Harrison (XVII, 344), to 1849; subsequent biographers vary in the year date. March 30 fell on Thursday in 1848, not in 1847 or 1849; moreover, Poe wrote Eveleth, February 29, 1848: “I mean to start for Richmond on the 10th March.”

266. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Huntington Library (HM 21869). The letter is here first printed in full. The location of Hirst’s letter to Poe is unknown.

267. Source: photostat of original MS. (4 pp.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter is here first printed in full. The envelope is directed to “Mrs Jane E. Locke/ Wamesit Cottag[e]/ Lowell/ Mass:/.” The letter was written on two leaves, the verso of leaf 2 carried correspondence at both top and bottom, with the address in the center; the address-portion of the leaf is badly ink-stained, some of the ink soaking through on the recto, but not obscuring the words. Poe’s first sentence suggests at least two letters from Mrs. Locke (both undatable and unlocated) ; however, “your last” may refer to a letter of some time past, and Poe’s present letter may be in answer to a follow-up note just received.

268. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The cover is not postmarked but bears the direction: “To / Charles H. Marshall Esqre.” The folds of the manuscript are considerably frayed.

269. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed, in facsimile, in the American Art Association catalogue, November 11-12, 1937, item 332, facing p. 130. The letter, which is unpostmarked, was probably sent by messenger.

270. Source: photostat of a handwritten copy (3 pp.) in the J. K. Lilly collection, Indianapolis. The present location of the original MS. is unknown; Quinn, Poe, p. 574, incorrectly assigns it to the Lilly collection. The letter is here first printed in full. On the verso of sheet 2 of the Lilly copy appears “To Anna Blackwell,” and below, in an unidentified hand, “J R Bartletts copy”; Bartlett may have been the Hon. John R. Bartlett, of New York, a friend of Sarah Helen Whitman (see P, II, 951). Ingram, Harrison, Woodberry, and Phillips misdate the letter; Quinn dates it correctly. In a transcript of the present letter, made by Mrs. Whitman for Ingram (Ingram collection, University of Virginia), is copied the address given by Poe: “Miss Anna [page 527:] Blackwell / care of Prof. de Bonneville / Providence / R. L” Poe is replying to Miss Blackwell’s letter of ca. May 24, 1848, which is unlocated.

271. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in W, II, 374-375. Poe’s “P.S.” suggests a possible letter from Taylor, though it is unlocated.

272. Source: letter published in Ingram, II, 219-220, where it was first printed. The correct year date is 1848, not 1849 as given in the various biographies; for Poe reviewed The Child of the Sea and Other Poems, published by Putnam, in the SLM, September 1848, and again in Graham’s, April 1849. Apparently no second edition appeared, though Poe suggested that Putnam bring it out (see Letter 315). In the Democratic Review, XXIII (August 1848), 160, Poe says that the volume “is now in press.” Thus, the present letter, which speaks of the MS. of the work, belongs to 1848. Ingram identifies the letter as to Mrs. Lewis, and, of course, the content corroborates the identity. The ellipsis probably indicates the omission of but a few words, perhaps a phrase of endearment.

273. Source: transcript of original MS. made by Mrs. Roland S. Houghton (Mrs. Marie Louise Shew) for John H. Ingram (see her letter to him, April 3 [1875?] in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia). The original MS. is probably lost. The letter was first printed in full (from the Shew transcript) in Quinn, Poe, 609-611, but with minor variations; it is here printed just as Mrs. Shew copied it for Ingram. On her transcript, just preceding her quotation from “The Raven,” Mrs. Shew interpolated the direction that here Poe copied a “whole stanza” from the poem; apparently she quoted only enough to identify the stanza for Ingram. The accuracy of her quotation is highly questionable (see Campbell, Poems, p. 112, lines 63-66). For the bracketed “say” following the quotation, Ingram and Quinn give “repeat”; but the Shew transcript shows “say” written over “repeat.” Ingram’s printings of the letter with omissions in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, and in his Life (1880), which are followed by most subsequent biographers, assign the letter to 1848; Quinn, Poe, pp. 609-611, without authority dates the letter June 19, but gives “1849,” the date on Mrs. Shew’s transcript. In her letter to Ingram cited above, Mrs. Houghton said, “The following [letter] was his last and was written in June / 49”; but clearly she was wrong: the contents of the letter point to June (assuming her month date is correct) 1848. Poe is replying to Mrs. Shew’s letter of June (?) 1848, which is unlocated.

274. Source: photostat of the original MS. (1 p.) in the Huntington Library (HM 24218). The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, LXV (February 1903), 549. Though the letter is dated July 13, the reference to “tomorrow and Sunday” points clearly to its having been written on Friday, July 14, The envelope is directed to “Dr Thomas Holley Chivers/ New-York City.” At the top of the MS. Chivers noted: “The following is the last letter that I ever received from him.” Though no letter from Chivers to Poe is known for 1848, the present letter suggests a note of recent date. Between Poe’s letter of July 22, 1846, and his present one, there is a lost letter, ante

[page 528:] January 30, 1847, for Chivers to Poe, February 21, 1847, said: “I received the paper, containing your letter and the notice of your writings, some time ago. I was delighted with your letter — that is, with the idea that you had got well again . . . from what you say, she [Virginia] is nigh to the angels . . .” (see H, XVII, 278). The lost letter was undoubtedly a note that accompanied the enclosures. Virginia Poe died January 30, 1847. Two letters from Chivers followed Poe’s lost letter: February 21 (just cited), and April 4, 1847 (H, XVII, 282-284), which also seems to suggest a lost letter from Chivers. Though the present letter is Poe’s last to Chivers, Poe wrote Mrs. Clemm, August 28-29 (?), 1849, “I got a sneaking letter today from Chivers”; however, Chivers’ letter is otherwise unknown.

275. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed, in facsimile, in the Washington (D. C.) Post, Sunday, January 17, 1909 (Ingram collection, University of Virginia). The letter carries no postmark and is merely addressed: “Mrs. Osborne.” It is also inscribed, in an unknown hand: “My aunt who was at the country seat of my brother in law Max [?] Lindsay near that of Poe’s cottage at Fordham.”

**[[Begin section X]]**

276. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in P, II, 1313. Postmarked New York, September 5, and directed to “Mrs Sarah Helen Whitman,/ Providence,/ R. I.” Though Poe made an effort to disguise his handwriting in the letter, that of the outside address is quite natural. With the exception of Quinn (Poe, p. 575), who dates it correctly, Poe biographers have dated the above letter “September 8,” incorrectly. This is Poe’s first known letter to Mrs. Whitman. For further discussion of the Poe-Whitman correspondence, see Note 278.

277. Source: Griswold’s “Memoir” of Poe in the edition of the Literati (New York: J. S. Redfield, 1850), pp. xxvii-xxix, where it was first printed. The original MS. is probably lost.

278. Source: original MS. (12 pp.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter is here first printed in its fullest possible text, some portions of the letter being past restoration. Until Dr. John G. Varner’s research (culminating in his unpublished dissertation, “Sarah Helen Whitman, Seeress of Providence,” University of Virginia, 1941), printed forms of the present letter were incomplete; but he succeeded in piecing together three manuscript fragments in the Lilly collection that proved to be the final, or sixth, leaf of the original letter (pages 11 and 12). Then, Mr. Lilly and Dr. Varner subjected to powerful electric lights and infrared photography those passages in the letter that had been heavily scratched out by Mrs. Whitman. Their resulting restorations of the original text, with a few additional ones by the present editor, have been indicated by brackets. The present MS. carries neither postmark nor address, but there can be no question to whom it was sent. In the left margin of page 1 of the MS. is written, presumably by Mrs. Whitman: “Edgar Allan Poe/ to Sarah Helen Whitman/ Fordham Oct. 1. 1848.” In the left margin of page 2 Mrs. Whitman wrote opposite [page 529:] the poem: “I simply showed him the/ lines that I might ask his/ opinion of a verse which/ the publisher wished me to alter.” In the second sentence of page 3 she scratched out the restored reading, “half sneers at,” and above wrote, “allusions to.” In the right margin of page 3, opposite the words “I passed through Providence with Mrs Osgood,” she wrote: “1845.” In the left margin of page 4, opposite the reference to the valentine, she wrote “Feb 1848.” In the lower left margin of page 6, appears, “Last lines or stanzas,” the exact allusion being unknown. On page 10, the editorial asterisks indicate the approximate number of letters in illegible words. Mrs. Whitman deleted extensively in transcribing this letter for J. H. Ingram. Poe is answering Mrs. Whitman’s letter of September 27-29 (?), 1848 (unlocated), her first to him, according to his letter of October 18 (see also Mrs. Whitman’s letter to Ingram, March 23, 1874, Ingram collection, University of Virginia, in which she admits that the present letter is an answer to one from her in September).

The Poe-Whitman romance has been treated in the various biographies. Their correspondence has never before been fully discussed, and because of misinformation, misdatings, and omissions (see notes to the letters here printed), the following list of items is presented: the starred items are extant in MS. originals by Poe, except the last, for which there is a copy from the original; no original letters by Mrs. Whitman are known to exist

Poe to Mrs. WhitmanMrs. Whitman to Poe

* September 5, 1848

September 27-29, 1848

* October 1, 1848

ca. October 10, 1848

* October 18, 1848

November 1-2, 1848

* (?) November 3, 1848

* November 7, 1848

November 7, 1848 (?)

November 8, 1848

November 14, 1848

November 17, 1848

November 18-20, 1848

* November 22, 1848

* November 24, 1848

* November 26, 1848

December 14-15, 1848

* December 16, 1848

* January 21, 1849

**[[For some reason, the sequence of the date is out of order with similar lists]]**

279. Source: letter printed in Anderson Galleries catalogue, April 29, 1924, item 956, where it was first printed. No other publication is known. The MS. is a 1 page quarto, addressed on the verso to T. L. Dunnell, Esq., [page 530:] Providence, R. L; location of the MS. is unknown. Poe is answering Dunnell’s letter of October 17 (?), location of the original of which is unknown.

280. Source: original MS. (9 pp.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in LL, pp. 19-29, without restoration of the obliterated portion on page 3; that portion is here first printed. The letter is undated; but “Oct 18, 48” has been penciled in at top of page one, “October r8, 1848” has been noted on the envelope that presumably belongs to this letter, and the envelope bears a very faded postmark of “New York [Oct.] 18.” The envelope is addressed to “Mrs Sarah Helen Whitman/ Providence/ R. I.” Besides the lock of hair Poe is said to have sent in this envelope, Poe probably sent the present letter, for on the envelope under the postmark is a “10” indicating the postal rate, too high for a small piece of paper and a lock of hair (Poe’s September 5, 1848, letter (1 p.) to Mrs. Whitman carried a five-cent rate). The bracketed reading on page 3 is based on the restoration made by Dr. Varner and Mr. Lilly (see Note 278). Poe is answering Mrs. Whitman’s letter of ca. October 10, which is unlocated.

281. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed, in facsimile, in the Parke-Bernet catalogue, May 24, 1939. No exact dating seems possible.

282. Source: facsimile of the MS. (1 p.) in the American Art Association catalogue, April 24-25, 1935, p. 127, item 252, where the letter was first printed, from the collection of Frederick Locker-Lampson, the original carrying the endorsement “F. Locker” on the verso. In a letter to Ingram, February 6 [1877 (?)], Locker-Lampson said he had a note from Poe to “Mrs. Richmond, dated Fordham, Oct 1848” (Ingram collection, University of Virginia). No exact dating seems possible. The original MS. may be in the Gimble collection, but is inaccessible.

283. Source: photostat of an original fragment in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter is here first printed. When it was sold by the Swann Auction Galleries, January 20, 1944, from the Titus C. Geesey collection, the fragment was described as written to Mrs. Annie L. Richmond of Providence to whom Poe was to have been married. The fragmentary nature of the manuscript almost defies identification; however, the present editor believes that the correspondent is not Mrs. Richmond, to whom Poe was never engaged to be married, and who did not live in Providence, R. L, but rather is Mrs. Sarah Helen Whitman, to whom he was engaged in December 1848, and who did live in Providence. Moreover, the tone of the fragment suggests that of Poe’s other letters to Mrs. Whitman, rather than those to Mrs. Richmond. And finally, Poe did not sign himself “Edgar” in his letters to Mrs. Richmond, but did in those to Mrs. Whitman. Accurate dating of the letter is most difficult; but assuming that the lines are to Mrs. Whitman, the present editor assigns them to a lost letter from Poe to Mrs. Whitman, November 3, 1848. In a letter to Ingram, October 25, 1875 (Ingram collection, University of Virginia), Mrs. Whitman mentions sending Poe a note [about November 1-2] that “perplexed and agitated him”; and added that [page 531:] Poe’s reply [November 3] stated that he “should be at Providence on the following evening” [November 4]. The rest of the present manuscript is unlocated, and is probably lost. Mrs. Whitman probably tore off the portion containing the signature, as was her habit at times, for some friend. Poe is presumably answering a letter from Mrs. Whitman, November 1-2, 1848, which is unlocated.

284. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in LL, pp. 30-31. Ingram (II, 174-175), followed by Harrison (XVII, 311), printed all but one sentence. All printings show no signature. Though undated by Poe, the MS. carries the following endorsements, presumably by Mrs. Whitman: in lower left corner, “Tuesday Nov 7”; and in lower right corner, “Edgar Poe to S H W. Nov 7 48/ 76 Benefit St — Providence R. L” On the verso appears Mrs. Whitman’s note: “Written the day on which Mr Poe returned from Lowell. I sent him word I would meet him in half an hour at the Atheneum. S H W.” Whether she wrote Poe a note or sent word by messenger is not known. The bottom portion of the original letter seems to have been torn off, probably by Mrs. Whitman as a souvenir of Poe’s autograph. Other correspondence between Poe and Mrs. Whitman at this time must have existed (all items are unlocated, with the possible exception of one fragment), for in a letter to Ingram, October 25, 1875, she mentions sending Poe a note [about November 1-2] that “perplexed and agitated him” (see also W, II, 277; Quinn, Poe, p. 579). In the same letter she cited Poe’s answer [November 3]. See the MS. fragment conjecturally assigned to this date, Letter 283

285. The original MS. is lost, so I have used the copy Mrs. Whitman made for John H. Ingram (Ingram collection, University of Virginia). The letter is here first printed as Mrs. Whitman transcribed it; the first printed, with minor variations, was by Ingram (II, 178). Several printings of this letter have appeared, no two agreeing in all details; one, a copy by Mrs. Whitman (?), appeared in Cosmopolitan Magazine in facsimile (Ingram collection, University of Virginia, n.d.) as reprinted from “ ‘The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe.’ Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., New York City”; but no edition containing such a facsimile has been found. The original letter had a postscript in which Poe thanked William J. Pabodie for kindness extended him during a recent illness in Providence; Pabodie borrowed the letter, after Mrs. Whitman made a copy, and later told her that he had either mislaid or lost it (see LL, p. 33) .

286. Source: Annie Richmond’s transcript made from the original MS. for Ingram (now in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia). Ingram printed incomplete texts in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, pp. 424-425, and in Ingram, II, 193-194 (H, XVII, 312-314, prints from the Appleton’s text, but cites the source as from the “Griswold Collection?”) ; the location of the original MS. is unknown, and is probably lost. Quinn (Poe, pp. 589-592), though using the Annie Richmond transcript, changes the pointing and for Poe’s “(if it can be called saving) saved me” prints the less satisfactory “(if [page 532:] it can be called easing) eased me.” At the head of her transcript, Mrs. Richmond wrote: “Copy of a letter written at Fordham Nov. 16th 1848 — “ Ingram noted on the transcript: “This must be burnt. J. H. I.” Though the letter was first printed in Quinn, Poe, pp. 589-592, it is here first given as Mrs. Richmond wrote it, which is undoubtedly the only extant source.

287. Source: transcript of the original MS. made by Edward V. Valentine of Richmond, Virginia, for John H. Ingram (now in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia) ; the original MS. is unlocated. The letter was first printed in Ingram, II, 197-198. At the head of the MS. copy, Mr. Valentine wrote: “A letter from Edgar Allan Poe to my cousin Mr Edward Valentine, of Buchanan, Botetourt County, Virginia. Mr Valentine is now 84 years of age. This is the letter I mentioned to you.” There is no evidence that Mr. Valentine replied.

288. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in LL, pp. 34-35; Ingram (II, 180-181), followed by Harrison (XVII, 317-318) and Woodberry (II, 290-291), prints under this date the letter for November 26, 1848, and omits the above letter. A penciled notation, presumably by Mrs. Whitman, appears on the verso of page 1: “November 22, 1848/ 3 Letters written on the 22. 24 & 26 of November”; moreover, the verso of page 1 carries the postmark: “New York/ 22 Nov/ 5 cts”; and the address: “Mrs. Sarah H. Whitman/ Providence/ R.I.” Poe is answering Mrs. Whitman’s “note” of November 17, location of the original of which is unknown.

289. Source: transcript of Poe’s original, made by Annie Richmond for J. H. Ingram (Ingram collection, University of Virginia). The original MS. is probably lost. The letter is here first printed in full. Ingram printed incomplete versions in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, p. 425, and in Ingram, II, 195-196; Harrison (XVII, 319-320) followed the Appleton’s text, but cited as his source, “Griswold collection?”

290. Source: original (4 pp.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in full in LL, pp. 36-40; Ingram (II, 70-71, 182184) prints it only in part and under proper date, but Harrison (XVII, 320322), reprinting Ingram, prints it wrongly under “November 25.” The entry “November 1848,” in handwriting resembling Mrs. Whitman’s, appears just above Poe’s dating, and at the end of page 4, Mrs. Whitman, presumably, wrote: “Fordham/ November 24th 1848”; in the lower right corner of page 4, parallel to the edge of the leaf, she wrote: “From Edgar Poe/ to Sarah Helen Whitman.” On page 3, toward the bottom, following “the,” is an obliterated passage preceded by an asterisk, and at the foot of the page Mrs. Whitman supplied (which I include in brackets) : “* the insults of your mother & sister still rankle at.” Her restoration seems accurate as far as it goes, but the obliterated space calls for additional filler; a clue is suggested for the missing word in Mrs. Whitman’s letter to Mrs. Mary Hewitt, September 25 or 27, 1850 (see Quinn, Poe, p. 585), where she quotes Poe’s epithet of resentment against her family: “intolerable insults”; the same phrase would fit the spacing and might well have been used both in the letter and on the occasion alluded [page 533:] to by Mrs. Whitman. Poe is replying to Mrs. Whitman’s letter of November 18-20 (?), promised in her note of November 17 (see Note 288), and clearly sent, as the content of the above letter proves.

291. Source: original MS. (3 pp.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in LL, pp. 41-43. The full dating is established by the following evidence: November 26, 1848, fell on Sunday; a strange hand noted in upper right corner of the MS.: “Nov 26 / 1848”; on the verso of Poe’s original to Mrs. Whitman, November 22, 1848, presumably in her hand, appears: “3 Letters written on the 22. 24 & 26 of November”; and finally, the content of the present letter supports the dating. On page 3 the portion of original MS. beginning with “Edgar” and ending with “enclosures” was cut out by Mrs. Whitman and given to James T. Fields in 1865. She then replaced the original with a copy, which accompanied the original MS., until Mr. Lilly purchased a volume of Poetical Works of E. A. Poe (London: Sampson Low & Co., 1857) that had once been in the Fields collection. Tipped in was the original fragment, with Fields’ endorsement: “given to me by Mrs. S. H. Whitman in 1865.” The fragment is here first printed as Poe wrote it. No reply to the present letter is known.

292. Source: facsimile of original MS. (1 p.) in Ingram’s Works of Edgar Allan Poe (1874), I, between lxxvii-lxxviii, where the letter is first printed. The original MS. is probably lost.

293. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in LL, p, 44, under the date of “Dec. 17, 1848,” but December 16, 1848, fell on Saturday. The holograph carries neither postmark nor address. The MS. was cut in two after the third line, and on the basis of the paper of the present MS. and that of the November 26 letter, both having the same width and the same embossed design, some eight or nine lines of the original MS. seem to be missing; evidence of wording belonging to the lost portion appears along the line of cutting and the word “mail” has been careted by a strange hand following “afternoons,” the inference being that “mail” was the first word of the original fourth line and was preserved in this manner. Poe is answering Mrs. Whitman’s letter of December 14-15 (?), 1848, the location of which is unknown.

294. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in LL, p. 50. The MS. has neither postmark nor address. Evidence for the authenticity of the letter is found in William J. Pabodie’s letter to Griswold, June 11, 1852 (H, XVII, 413) and in Mrs. Whitman’s letter to Mrs. Hewitt, September, 1850 (see Quinn, Poe, p. 584; Stanley T. Williams, “New Letters About Poe,” Yale Review, XIV (July 1925), 761-763) ; Mrs. Whitman, however, speaks of the “second train of cars.” The dating is supported by the two letters just cited, Mrs. Whitman giving the exact date. The present letter could be an unfinished fragment; moreover, it may never have been sent.

295. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter was first printed in LL, p. 46. Poe delivered his lecture on “The Poetic Principle” before the Franklin Lyceum of Providence on the evening [page 534:] of December 20 (W, II, 283-284; Quinn, Poe, p. 583); according to William J. Pabodie, in a letter to R. W. Griswold, June 11, 1852 (H, XVII, 413-414), Poe’s letter to Dr. Crocker was written within a few days after the lecture; Mrs. Whitman, writing to Mrs. Hewitt, in September 1850, gives the date of the letter as December 23 (see Stanley T. Williams, Yale Review, XIV (July 1925), 755-773), Since Poe was back in New York on December 28 (see his letter to Mrs. Richmond), the letter above must have been written prior to the Sunday on which the banns were to be published; December 23, Saturday, is the most likely date and agrees with Mrs. Whitman’s dating. In the J. K. Lilly collection is the original draft of the letter Poe wrote to Dr. Crocker. It reads: “Dear Sir,/ Will you have the/ kindness to publish the banns/ of matrimony between Mrs./ Sarah Helen Whitman and/ myself on Sunday and/ Monday. When we have.”

296. Source: Ingram, II, 196-197, where the letter was first printed, though not in full. No original or transcript by Mrs. Richmond is known. Though not fully dated, the letter belongs to December 1848.

297. Source: original letter, written on page 4 of a MS. of the poem, “The Prisoner of Peroté,” in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia. On the front page of the MS. appears: “These corrections and the note in pencil on the last page are Poe’s in his hand writing — Estella.” On the last page is Ingram’s note: “Poe MS. JHI.” The letter was first printed by Ingram in the Albany Review (London), I (July 1907), 420-421. The MS. is undated, and the present dating is suggested on the following basis: in the known letters from Poe to Mrs. Lewis, a familiar tone does not appear until May 17, 1849, though this evidence is, of course, scarcely conclusive; on the other hand, “The Prisoner of Peroté” was included by Mrs. Lewis in Myths of the Minstrel (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1852, pp. 29-32). The “prose paragraph,” a translation from a “Spanish paper,” appeared as a note in the appendix (p. 94) ; and in the “Advertisement” Mrs. Lewis said: “These Poems, with one or two exceptions, have been written since the publication of ‘Child of the Sea, and other Poems.’ “ Though the subject matter and tone of the present poem are typical of the other poems in Myths of the Minstrel, “The Prisoner of Peroté” may have been one of the “exceptions.” Available evidence from the tone of Poe’s note on the MS. of the poem and from the statement by Mrs. Lewis suggests a dating for the note between the summer of 1848, when the Child of the Sea was published (see Letter 272), and May 1849. A date as early as 1845 is also possible: Poe was living in New York at that time, and Phillips (11, 1374) quotes Mrs. Lewis’ husband as saying that he first knew Poe in 1845. Ingram’s statement in the Albany Review, cited above, that “The Prisoner of Peroté” was published in Mrs. Lewis’ The Records of the Heart (deposited in Clerk’s Office for the Southern District of New York, April 20th, 1844, and published by George S. Appleton, 1844) is erroneous. In view of the available evidence, the present editor inclines to the later dating. Poe may be answering a lost letter from Mrs. Lewis or an oral request.

298. The present text is a composite of that portion of the letter printed [page 535:] by Ingram in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, p. 425, and that printed in Ingram, II, 202-203 (H, XVII, 318-319, though ascribing the source as the “Griswold collection?”, is clearly following the Appleton printing; he also misdates the letter by placing it among those for 1848). The Appleton’s fragment was here used as the basic text; daggers enclose readings not found in the Life text; brackets, except for the date and place, supplied by the editor, enclose readings not found in Appleton’s. No printing is complete, though the present one is the fullest known. Ingram (II, 201) says Poe’s letter to Mrs. Richmond, undated, was enclosed in one from Mrs. Clemm to Mrs. Richmond, which he dates January 11, 1849. A search of the items in the Ingram collection (University of Virginia) failed to reveal Ingram’s source for his printings, though it was probably a transcript of the original made by Mrs. Richmond. Poe’s preceding letter to Mrs. Richmond (December 28, 1848) was but two weeks before the present one. The texts of most of Poe’s letters to Annie Richmond are necessarily of a composite nature, derived from Ingram’s versions in Appleton’s Journal (1878) and in his Life of Poe (1880), location of original MSS. or Annie’s transcripts being unknown. Subsequent to the appearance of the Appleton’s article, Mrs. Richmond’s letters to Ingram (University of Virginia) revealed her surprise and displeasure at Ingram’s publishing for the eyes of the world what she had transcribed only for the eyes of the biographer; perhaps Annie’s feelings controlled Ingram’s further editings of the Life texts.

In printing Poe’s letters to Mrs. Richmond, Ingram omits quotation marks with Annie’s name, in the Appleton’s text, but uses them in the Life text; I have followed Annie’s own procedure, based upon her known transcripts made for Ingram. Both “Eddy” and “Eddie” appear in the Ingram versions; Annie and Poe used “Eddy.”

299. Source: photostat of original (2 pp.) in the Huntington Library (HM 21874). The letter is here first printed in full; P, II, 1367-1368, prints the letter in part, but misdates it “January 18.” Poe’s first sentence implies a previous letter to Thompson, but no MS. or printing is known, except Woodberry’s statement (II, vii) that the Poe signature on the frontispiece was taken from a letter to Thompson, December 7, 1848 (unlocated). Poe’s first sentence might allude to a request for the “two Messengers” made in that letter, except that the signature of the present letter differs from that of the frontispiece.

300. Source: letter printed for first time in Whitty, p. lxxi, from MS.; the bracketed readings, given above, are not found in the Whitty printing, but in P, II, 1368, probably from MS. The present location of the MS. is unknown. Whitty says the letter is to Priestly, proprietor of the American Whig Review; this is confirmed and the year date established by Poe’s letter to Mrs. Richmond, January 21, 1849, in which he says: “I sent yesterday an article to the Am. Review, about ‘Critics and Criticism.’ “ This is the only known letter between Poe and Priestly.

301. The present text is a composite of that portion of the letter printed, by Ingram in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, pp. 425-426, and that printed [page 536:] in Ingram, II, 203-205 (H, XVII, 327-329, follows the Life text). The Appleton’s fragment was used as the basic text; daggers enclose readings not found in the Life text; brackets, except for the date, enclose readings not found in Appleton’s. No printing is complete, though the present one is the fullest known. According to Ingram, the letter was undated and was sent to Annie with one Poe wrote to Mrs. Whitman (see Letter 302 and notes). Consultation of the notes to the Poe-Whitman letter just cited is requisite to an understanding of various allusions in the present letter. Poe is answering a Mrs. Richmond letter (January 20 (?) or earlier), of which no MS. or printing is known, save the part quoted by Poe. A search of the items in the Ingram collection (University of Virginia) failed to reveal Ingram’s source for his printings, though it was probably a transcript of the original made by Mrs. Richmond.

302. Source: the MS. copy (Ingram collection, University of Virginia) of the original (probably 2 pp.) made by Annie Richmond for J. H. Ingram (see her letter to Ingram, January 14, 1877); the location of Poe’s original is unknown. The letter is here first printed in full. The dating of this letter presents a curious problem. Without the MS. letter, there is no evidence to prove Poe dated it “January 25, 1849,” the date given by Quinn (Poe, p. 586); the source for this dating is Annie Richmond’s copy enclosed in her letter to Ingram, January 14, 1877 (Ingram collection, University of Virginia). But Poe wrote the letter and enclosed it in one to Mrs. Richmond in January 1849 (see Letter 301). Poe may have dated the letter ahead, under the circumstances, Mrs. Richmond copying that date correctly in her transcript for Ingram; or Poe may have entered no date, Mrs. Richmond supplying a dating for Ingram that corresponded with her posting of the letter; in neither instance was the date of composition given. On the other hand, Poe’s letter to John Priestly, Saturday, January 20, 1849, accompanied a contribution to the American Whig Review, and Poe’s letter to Annie Richmond in January [January 21 (?), 1849] says: “I sent yesterday an article to the American Review . . .” Though Poe was not always accurate as to dates, it is reasonable to suppose him correct in this one. Therefore, since his letter to Mrs. Whitman was enclosed in that to Mrs. Richmond, its compositional date seems to have been January 21 (?), 1849. Dr. Quinn (Poe, pp. 586-587, and n.) calls attention to a curious reading found in the MS. copy made by Mrs. Richmond; however, the MS. reads clearly, not “I have assigned on reason . . . ,” as Dr. Quinn gives it, but “I have assigned no reason . . “ as printed above.

**[[begin section XI]]**

303. Source: photostat of extant portion of original (fragments of 2 pp.) in the Morgan Library, supplemented by J. H. Ingram’s two texts as printed in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, p, 426, and in Ingram, II, 205-207 (the Life text is fuller, but the Appleton text includes words not in the Life; H, XVII, 330-331, follows the Life text). The letter is here first printed in its fullest known form, though a portion is still lacking and probably lost; the original MS. was certainly no longer than two pages, a recto and verso of one leaf. The unbracketed portions come from the Appleton’s Journal text; material [page 537:] in daggers comes from the Morgan Library fragment; material in brackets, except for address, date, and pagination, comes from the Life text. Though the MS. has the top portion of pages 1 and 2 torn off, identification of the addressee is established by the last three lines of the letter; the publication of “Hop-Frog” in The Flag of Our Union, March 17, 1849 (Wyllie, Poe’s Tales, p. 327), and Poe’s statement that he “. . . returned from Providence — six weeks ago” (by December 28, 1848 — see Letter 296) suggest the correct dating of the above letter as February 8, 1849, which, incidentally, was on Thursday. The missing portion of page 2 of the MS. was equivalent to that represented by all the material on page 1 preceding the passage in daggers, beginning “How I wish my Annie . . .”; emendations of lines destroyed by the tearing or cutting of the MS. were made from Ingram’s Life text, as indicated.

Poe’s statement that the proprietor of The Flag “wrote to me . . . and I accepted . . .” suggests at least one exchange of letters between Poe and Gleason. In his letter to Mrs. Richmond, January 21 (?), 1849, Poe says he “had two proposals within the last week from Boston”; perhaps Gleason made one of them in a letter that can be dated only between January 18 (?) and February 5, 1849, and Poe’s acceptance may have been in the letter dated Feb. 5, 1849, unlocated, but sold by Dodd Mead Company, catalogue 46, March, 1897, item 76. **[[66 supp. Has the Poe to Gleason letter]]**

304. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed in the Century Magazine, XLVIII (October 1894), 863-864. The envelope is covered with addresses and postmarks, which seem to indicate: first, Poe directed the letter to F. W. Thomas, Louisville, Kentucky, from which it was returned to New York, February 27; then Poe directed it to Editor of “The Chronicle,” 47 Wall St.; next it was sent to Frankfort, Kentucky, from which it was redirected, April 5, to Washington, D.C., the last address having no line drawn through it. Thomas noted on the envelope: “Recd April 10, 1849.” Page 3 of the holograph contains a review of Mrs. S. Anna Lewis’ Child of the Sea and Other Poems. Under the review appears, probably in Thomas’ hand, “This notice was never published.” The bracketed restorations on pages 1 and 2 of the present letter appear in the MS. over Poe’s lines crossed out; the restorations are certainly not Thomas’. Since Poe’s last letter, May 14, 1845, Thomas wrote at least five, but Poe does not seem to have replied until the present letter, though such a long silence toward Thomas seems incredible. Thomas’ letters, all unpublished, were as follows: July 10, 1845 (MS. in the Boston Public Library), September 29, 1845 (MS. in the Boston Public Library), August 14, 1846 (MS. in the New York Public Library), August 24, 1846 (MS. in the Boston Public Library), and November 27, 1848 (unlocated). This is Poe’s last known letter to Thomas, and no further letters from Thomas have been located.

305. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed, from a transcript, in H, XVII, 335. The MS. letter is an extra illustration in Duyckinck’s own copy of his Cyclopedia, at present in the New York Public Library. [page 537:]

306. Source: Mrs. Richmond’s transcript made from the original MS. for Ingram (now in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia). Ingram printed incomplete texts in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, pp. 4z6-427, and in Ingram, II, 207-210 (H, XVII, 335-338, prints from the Appleton’s text, but cites his source as from the “Griswold Collection”); location of the original MS. is unknown. Quinn (Poe, pp. 597-599) Prints from the Annie Richmond transcript, but changes her pointing, fills in abbreviations, and, in one or two instances, varies in wording. “February 19, 1849” has been the accepted dating, despite the fact that the 19th fell on Monday, and the letter is headed “Sunday”; Poe was more likely to have erred in the date than the day, and the correct dating of the letter, therefore, is probably “Feb. 18. Sunday 1849.” Though Poe is known to have written four letters to Mrs. Richmond between his of November 16, 1848, and the present one, the number of her letters to him is less certain: she wrote the one to which his of January 21 (?), 1849, is a reply, and of the “letters to me & my mother,” cited above, one or two must have been to Poe himself; no letter from Mrs. Richmond to Poe, either in MS. or in print, is known.

307. Source: original MS. (1 p.) in the J. K. Lilly, Jr., collection, Indianapolis. The letter is here printed for the first time. On the verso of the MS. appears: “The handwriting of / Edgar Allan Poe.” The letter carries neither postmark nor address, and its content, especially its salutation, suggests it may have been enclosed in a letter to Mrs. Annie Richmond (unlocated). Originally Poe seems to have written “kiss dear Annie for me”; but “Ca” appears written over “An” by someone in such a way that the second “n” of Annie would be read as the “rr” of Carrie. The change may or may not have been Poe’s.

308. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 PP.) in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. The letter was first printed in the New York Public Library Bulletin, VI (January 1902), 10. The year date is established by Duyckinck’s printing of “Ulalume” in the Literary World, March 3, 1849 (see Letter 305). On the envelope, which was not mailed, appears: “Evert A. Duyckinck Esqr.” In upper left corner, page 1, of MS., is the entry: “1849.” This is Poe’s last known letter to Duyckinck, and no subsequent letter from Duyckinck is known.

309. The present text is a composite of that portion of the letter printed by Ingram in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, pp. 427-428, and that printed in Ingram, II, 210-212 (H, XVII, 342-344, follows the Life text). The Appleton’s fragment was used as the basic text. Daggers enclose readings not found in the Life text; brackets, except for the remark on the signature, enclose readings not found in Appleton’s. No printing is complete, though the present one is the fullest known. Both of Ingram’s versions omit a salutation, and in the Appleton’s text (p. 427) he states that the letter is “too lengthy to quote in full.” A search of the items in the Ingram collection (University of Virginia) failed to reveal Ingram’s source for his printings, though it was probably a transcript of the original made by Mrs. Richmond. Poe seems to be answering a letter from Mrs. Richmond (no MS. or printing known), for [page 539:] he apparently quotes portions of it and implies queries put by her; a conjectural date for it would be between February 18, 1849 (his last to her) and March 22, 1849.

310. Source: Willis’ article, “Death of Edgar A. Poe,” first printed in the, Home Journal, October 20, 1849, p. 2 (reprinted in H, I, 362-363). The original MS. is probably lost.

311. The present text is a composite of that portion of the letter printed by Ingram in Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, p. 428, and that printed in Ingram, if, 213-215 (H, XVII, 345-346, follows the Life text). The Life fragment, in this instance, was used as the basic text; daggers enclose readings not found in the Life text; brackets, except for the date line and place and the note on the signature, enclose readings not found in Appleton’s. No printing is complete; Quinn (Poe, pp. 603-605) prints a composite text that is essentially the same as the one above, but his pointing varies in minor details and he shows but half the ellipses necessary to an understanding of Ingram’s editing. Both of Ingram’s versions omit signature. A search of the items in the Ingram collection (University of Virginia) failed to reveal Ingram’s source for his printings, though it was probably a transcript of the original made by Mrs. Richmond. Definite dating of the letter seems impossible: Ingram, Harrison, and Phillips leave it undated; Woodberry (II, 417) dates it “May, 1849,” Allen (II, 804-805) quotes part and dates it “March, 1849,” and Quinn, supra, suggests “the spring of 1849” and after April 21, 1849. “For Annie” appeared in the Home Journal, April 28, 1849, which was probably in advance of date (see Letter 310 and note); thus Mrs. Richmond could have received the Home Journal and written to Poe by April 28. Since Poe visited Mrs. Richmond during the last week in May (see Letter 316), leaving Fordham on May 23, the present dating of the letter has been adopted; however, a date late in April is more probable. Poe is answering a letter from Mrs. Richmond (no MS. or printing known); a conjectural dating of which would be April 26-May 21, 1849. (See Note 312.)

312. Source: facsimile of original MS. (3 pp.) in SLP, between pp. 14-15. The original MS. is unlocated. The letter was first printed by Eugene Field in America, II (April 11, 1889), 45-46, in an article entitled “Poe, Patterson and Oquawka.” Allen, without authority, dates the letter April 8 (A, II, 809-810); there is no address or postmark on the fourth page of the letter, a separate cover apparently having been used and since lost. Patterson’s May 7, 1849, letter to Poe was answered May 23, after a week’s delay; thus up to a week or ten days can be allowed for the transit of a letter between New York and Oquawka. Since Patterson introduced his May 7 letter with “I hasten to reply . . .” Poe’s letter must have been written at least a week before, but in April. Furthermore, Poe’s letter to Mrs. Richmond, April 28 (?)-May 23 (?), 1849, does not mention Patterson’s offer nor carry the note of optimism that the December 18, 1848, letter from Oquawka certainly must have inspired. Thus, the letter to Mrs. Richmond was written probably prior to Poe’s reply to Patterson, and his letter to Mrs. Richmond is dated April 28 (?)-May 23 (?), 1849, though very likely before the last day of April, [page 540:] and his reply to Patterson is dated April 30 (?) in order to place it after the letter to Mrs. Richmond and still place it in the April dating which the holograph carries (see Letter 311).

The Poe-Patterson correspondence consists of 9 letters. Of these, the 4 from Poe (April 30 (?), May 23, July 19, and August 7, 1849) and 2 of Patterson’s (the memoranda of May 7 and the letter of August 21, 1849) are printed in SLP, the last cited having been printed in Gill, pp. 232-233. These letters do not include three unlocated ones from Patterson (December 18, 1848, and 2 between May 23 and June 7, mentioned by Poe in his letter of July 19, 1849)

313. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Huntington Library (HM 21873). The letter was first printed (without date) in the Anderson Galleries Catalogue, November 29, 1920, item 346 (P, II, 1403-1404, prints the letter from MS. with date). Poe is answering a letter from Thompson of unknown date (location of original unknown).

314. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore; reproduced in facsimile in the American Art Association Catalogue, February 28-March 1, 1935, item 344, facing p. 84, where it was first printed. The year date is established by the reference to “For Annie” (see Letter 309 and note). “Edgar Poe” is written in the upper left corner of the MS., perhaps by Mrs. Lewis. Poe is replying, it seems, to a letter from Mrs. Lewis, ante May 17, 1849, unlocated; and the present letter implies a further note from Mrs. Lewis, also unlocated.

315. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in Henkels’ Catalogue, April 10, 1935, item 78. The MS. is torn along upper left margin but no words are missing. In the upper left corner of the MS. is a notation: “ansd May 20,” which indicates that Putnam replied promptly to Poe’s letter, though the item is unlocated.

316. Source: facsimile of original MS. (2 pp.) in SLP, between pp. 2o-21 and 22-z3. The original MS. is unlocated. The letter was first printed by Eugene Field in “Poe, Patterson and Oquawka,” in America, II (April 11, 1889), 47. Allen (A, II, 811, 815) misdates it “May 7.” The cover of the letter was postmarked May 25 at New York. Poe is answering Patterson’s ‘letter of May 7, only the memoranda of which are known (see SLP, p. 16).

317. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Wrenn Library of the University of Texas. The letter was first printed in Griswold’s “Preface” to the Literati (1850; reprinted in Works, I (1853), xxii-xxiii), not only with additions and omissions in the first part of the letter, but also an added “P.S.” not found in the MS. (see also Quinn, Poe, p. 670). The MS. is undated, but has been assigned by various editors to March or June; also the MS. has been docketed “about ‘45,” in a strange hand, but this date is clearly wrong. In his letter to Annie Richmond, March 23, 1849, Poe speaks of “For Annie” as of recent composition, and to her, April 28 (?) -May 23 (?), 1849, he mentions “Annabel Lee” for the first time; since Poe, in order to have “a true copy,” sent “For Annie” to the Home Journal, where it was printed, April 28, [page 541:] 1849, and since Griswold says he knew of “Annabel Lee” in June 1849 (see Campbell, Poems, p. 293), the most probable date for the above letter to Griswold seems to be between April 28 and June, 1849; therefore, May (?), 1849, is here given as a satisfactory guess. Quinn (Poe, p. 670) suggests the possibility of a “P.S.” that mentioned “Annabel Lee,” to which Griswold added the forged references to Graham, Godey, and Eveleth; but besides Quinn’s statement that such a postscript would scarcely be cut off for the sake of framing the letter, certainly both Poe and Griswold knew at this time that Graham no longer owned Graham’s (see Letter 319), and “Annabel Lee” could not be sold to him, though it might have been sent to Godey. In all probability, there was no postscript to Poe’s original letter.

318. Source: photostat of original (x p.) in the Pierpont Morgan Library. The letter is here first printed.

319. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter is here first printed in full. Ingram presumably had a transcript from Mrs. Richmond, but deleted portions; subsequent printings have followed Ingram (Appleton’s Journal, May 1878, p. 428; Ingram, II, 216-217), with or without further deletions. References to Oquawka, Illinois, the home of E. H. N. Patterson (see Poe’s letters to him), and to Tuel place the present letter in 1849. The first few lines of the above letter suggest an exchange of correspondence between Poe and Mrs. Richmond, following his visit with her during the last week in May (see Note 311). In the second paragraph of page 2, the bracketed emendation is due to a heavily scratched out name in the MS. Concerning Poe’s actual departure for Richmond, see the note to Letter 324. This is the last known letter from Poe to Annie Richmond.

320. Source: photostat of original MS. (2 pp.) in the Berg collection of the New York Public Library. The letter is here first printed in its correct form; Ingram (II, 217-219) and Wilson (PE (reprint), pp. 22-24), used Eveleth’s copy made for Ingram (now in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia), but Eveleth omitted all of the second paragraph, except the last two sentences, replacing the omission with: “You have had time to form an opinion of ‘Eureka’.” He also omitted from the third paragraph, “I bad him especially in view when I wrote the passage.” He made certain other minor changes. Harrison (XVII, 360-362) followed Ingram. Poe is replying to Eveleth’s letter of February 17, 1849, the original MS. of which is in the New York Public Library, and which is printed in EP (reprint), pp. 22-23; however, Eveleth had written Poe on March 9 and July 9, 1848, but Poe had not answered. The present letter is Poe’s last to Eveleth, but Eveleth appears to have written one more to Poe, which is unlocated; it is cited by Eveleth from an undated letter to him from Mrs. Clemm, while she was visiting Annie Richmond in Lowell: she wrote, “Your last letter to him was sent to me from Richmond after he had gone to dwell with the angels” (see PE (reprint), p, 3)

321. Source: photostat of original (1 p.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed by Woodberry, Century Magazine, XLVIII (October [page 542:] 1894), 864. Griswold did not print the letter, but did insert in his “Preface,” p. xxii, under the date of “early 1849,” for which there is no known original, a longer letter that is undoubtedly a forgery of the present one. The Griswold version of the letter (reprinted in H, XVII, 326-327) cites at least two articles Poe did not write and strikes a fawning note not characteristic of Poe’s dealings with Griswold.

This is probably the last letter between Poe and Griswold; certainly it is the last known to have been written. Mrs. Susan Archer Talley Weiss (see H, I, 323) says Poe wrote to Griswold inviting him to become Poe’s literary executor, and that Poe showed her the reply. Neither letter has ever appeared in MS. or in printed form, and almost certainly never existed, though many biographers of Poe have leaned kindly to the possibility of existence of one or both. Mrs. Clemm, in signing over to Griswold the right to publish Poe’s works, mentioned that it was Poe’s “express wish and injunction” that Griswold edit the MSS., but there is no indication of written correspondence to that effect. Griswold himself states in his “Memoir” that he did not know of such a wish on Poe’s part until after Poe’s death. If Mrs. Weiss’s statement were to be accepted as true, the date of the letters would probably be late August or September 1849 (see Quinn, Poe, pp. 635-636); Miss Mary Phillips (II, 1557) dates Poe’s, “June 29, 1849,” from Fordham; Woodberry (11, 450) inclines to a June dating. Until evidence appears that is more reliable than that now at hand, it must be supposed that Poe did not invite Griswold by letter to become his literary executor, Griswold did not accept by letter, and the present letter, above, is the last known one between the two men.

322. Source: letter printed in the Merwin-Clayton catalogue, May 13, 1912, item 965-A, where it was first printed. The catalogue states that the letter is an a.l.s., 1 page octavo, with envelope; its present location is unknown. Poe is replying to Root’s letter of ante June 28, 1849, which is unlocated.

323. Source: printed letter in C. Chauncey Burr’s “Character of Edgar A. Poe,” The Nineteenth Century, V (February 1852), 29, where it was first printed, with Mrs. Clemm’s permission, but as extracts only, from the original MS., which is now lost. Burr begins each paragraph with quotation marks; where he uses end quotation the present text uses ellipses to indicate an obvious omission from the MS. The letter was written in Philadelphia, not New York (see John Sartain, Reminiscences of a Very Old Man, p. 206 ff.; see also Letters 326, 327 and 328).

324. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in Quinn, Poe, p. 633, but without date and with the implication that it belongs at the time of the September letters to Mrs. Clemm and Mrs. Lewis.

325. Source: printed letter in C. Chauncey Burr’s “Character of Edgar A. Poe,” The Nineteenth Century, V (February 1852), 29, where it was first printed with Mrs. Clemm’s permission, but as extracts only, from the original MS., which is now lost. [page 543:]

326. Source: printed letter in C. Chauncey Burr’s “Character of Edgar A. Poe,” The Nineteenth Century, V (February 1852), 30, where it was first printed with Mrs. Clemm’s permission from the original MS., which is now lost; the absence of end quotation marks and the presence of the signature may suggest that the present letter is printed in full. Though not fully dated, the letter certainly belongs to July 14, 1849, since its content generally and tone in particular belong prior to the letter of July 19. Enclosed in this letter may have been that of “Near Richmond,” same date.

327. Source: printed letter in C. Chauncey Burr’s “Character of Edgar A. Poe,” The Nineteenth Century, V (February 1852), 30-31, where it was first printed with Mrs. Clemm’s permission, but as extracts only, from the original MS., which is now lost. The letter belongs unquestionably to 1849 (see Letter 326 and note), and according to Burr’s pointing and omission of signature is certainly incomplete. Poe is answering Mrs. Clemm’s letter of July 15-18 (?), 1849, which was in reply to his request of July 14, Saturday Night; no printing or MS. of her letter is known.

328. Source: facsimile of original MS. (1 p.) in SLP, between pp. 24-25. The original MS. is unlocated. The letter was first printed by Eugene Field in “Poe, Patterson and Oquawka,” in America, II (April 11, 1889), 24. The letter belongs unquestionably to 1849 (see Letter 316); it is postmarked July 21 from Richmond. The letter is written on page 1 of a folded leaf, pages 2-3 are blank, and page 4 carries the address. Poe is replying to Patterson’s two letters, written between May 23-June 7, the location of which is unknown (see Letter 32-9).

329. Source: facsimile of original MS. (2 pp.) in SLP, between pp. 26-27. The original MS. is unlocated. The letter was first printed in Gill, pp. 232-233; also in SLP, pp. 24-26, from the article in America, II (April 11, 1889), 47. The letter, written on a folded leaf, occupies pages 1-2, with page 3 blank and on page 4 the address. It is postmarked from Richmond, August 1[?]; thus it was mailed not before August 10 and perhaps as late as August 16, since Patterson’s reply is dated August 21 and states: “. . . I hasten to reply” (see H, XVII, 365-366). Poe is replying to two unlocated letters from Patterson, written between May 23-June 7, 1849.

330. Source: photostat of the MS. fragment (4 pp.) in the Boston Public Library. The letter was first printed by Woodberry in the Century Magazine, XLVIII (October 1894), 865-866, from the fragment; the complete letter has never been printed, and the missing portions of the MS. are unlocated, and are undoubtedly lost. The MS. fragment of four pages probably begins with the text of page 3, for the suggested pagination of the fragment is based on pages 3 (?) and 4 (?) being recto and verso of one leaf, and pages 5 (?) and 6 (?) being recto and verso of another leaf. Some eight lines are missing from the bottom portion of page 3 (?), above; the tearing off of these lines destroyed most of the wording of the first line of the “Wednesday Night” message. Only “dear Muddy” is clear; suggested emendations are highly conjectural, and asterisks have been used, as accurately as possible, to represent missing letters. Dating the present letter presents difficulties. [page 544:] Poe seems to have written Mrs. Clemm a letter that can be dated only tentatively as August 2-14, and that arrived in New York after she mailed her letter to Annie Richmond, August 4 (MS. in the Ingram collection, University of Virginia). Mrs. Clemm told Annie that she had received no word from Poe for two weeks, probably referring to Poe’s letter of July 19, 1849; also, she is undoubtedly alluding to this July 19 letter in her communication to Griswold, August 27 (H, XVII, 394-395) wherein she says that Poe “is getting better and hopes he will soon be able to attend to business.” Another letter from Poe to Mrs. Clemm, the one printed above, can be dated August 28-29 (?), 1849; either through Poe’s delay in mailing it or through Mrs. Clemm’s in calling for it at the post office, this letter must have reached her after she wrote to Mrs. Richmond, September 3 (MS. in Ingram collection), and before she wrote to Griswold, September 4 (H, XVII, p. 395), for she told Annie that she had had no letter for three weeks, but told Griswold, “I have just heard from him, he writes in fine spirits and says his prospects are excellent.” In Mrs. Clemm’s letter to Mrs. Richmond, September 15 (Ingram collection), she says she is enclosing “the only one I received for nearly four weeks”; that is, the only one since the letter of August 2-14. In the same letter to Mrs. Richmond, Mrs. Clemm mentions a “note” received “yesterday.” Thus, the letter enclosed would be that of August 28-29 (?), and the “note” would be still another communication from Poe, with the plausible dating of September 1213. The next letter in the series, and his final to Mrs. Clemm, is that of Tuesday, September 18, 1849. Biographers and editors have given various datings to the present letter, actuated partly by the docketing in a strange hand at the head of the MS.: “Sept. 1849” (W, II, 326, gives “Sept. [5]”; H, XVII, 368, “Sept”; P, II, 1462, “September early”; and Quinn, Poe, p. 626, n., points out that Wednesday, September 5, would be correct for the “Wednesday Night” portion of the letter, but that the first portion would have been earlier). Between July 19 and September 18, the only letters known to have been written by Mrs. Clemm to Poe are the two mentioned in his letter to her, September 18, 1849

331. Source: photostat of original MS. (3 pp.) in the Morgan Library, New York. The letter was first printed in the New York Herald, February 19, 1905, from which it was reprinted in W, II, 331. The dating of the letter seems established by Miss Ingram’s statement (see Quinn, Poe, pp. 629-631) that Poe read “Ulalume” to a group of people at the Hygeia Hotel at Old Point Comfort on Sunday evening, September 9, 1849, and that she received a MS. copy of the poem the next day, which would have been Monday, September 10. The envelope carries no postmark and is addressed merely “Miss Susan Ingram.”

332. Source: photostat of a MS. fragment in Poe’s hand and of a transcript of the whole letter in Maria Clemm’s hand (probably), both items being in the Enoch Pratt Library; the original Poe letter was undoubtedly two pages in length. Although C. Chauncey Burr printed one paragraph, the letter was first printed in full in Woodberry (1885), pp. 339-340 the sources being [page 545:] apparently those used for the present text. The two letters from Mrs. Clemm that Poe is answering are probably her replies to his letter of August 28-29 (?) and his note of September 12-13. Poe lectured on “The Poetic Principle” in Norfolk, not on “Monday” as he says, but on Friday, September 14 (see Quinn, Poe, p. 629). If Susan V. C. Ingram’s account of her being with Poe in Old Point Comfort, September 9, is true (see Quinn, Poe, pp. 629-631), and of Poe’s later calling on her family near Norfolk, he may have left Richmond shortly after his letter to Mrs. Clemm, August 28-29 (?), probably wrote the “note” from Old Point Comfort or Norfolk, delivered his lecture, and returned to Richmond, as he says, “last night from Norfolk,” on September 17. No MS. or printing of Mrs. Clemm’s two letters is known.

333. Source: photostat of original MS. (1 p.) in the William H. Koester collection, Baltimore. The letter was first printed in Quinn, Poe, p. 633. Someone, probably Mrs. Lewis, entered the bracketed date at the head of the letter; though the date may indicate the day received, it may well be the date written, for Poe wrote a letter to Mrs. Clemm on Tuesday, September 18, 1849 (Letter 332), in which he says he has just returned to Richmond and found letters from her and a letter from Mrs. Lewis. Poe is replying to two letters from Mrs. Lewis, written sometime between June 30 and September 16, 1849, both of which are unlocated.

 


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[S:0 - OLT66, 1966] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Editions - The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe (J. W. Ostrom) (Letters: Notes to Letters 174-332)