Text: Edgar Allan Poe, “Eulalie” (Text-01), “Hirst” manuscript, about January-February 1843


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[[This version has the changes applied]]

Eulalie

I dwelt alone

In a world of moan,

And my soul was a stagnant tide

Till the fair and gentle Eulalie became my blushing bride —

Till the yellow-haired young Eulalie became my smiling bride.

 

And ah! less bright

The stars of the night

Than the eyes of the radiant girl,

And never a flake

Their lustre can make

Of the vapor and gold and pearl

Can vie with the sweet young Eulalie’s most unregarded curl —

Can compare with the bright-eyed Eulalie’s most humble and careless curl.

 

Now Doubt — now Pain

Come never again,

For her soul gives me sigh for sigh,

And all day long

Shines bright and strong

Astarté within the sky,

And ever to it dear Eulalie upturns her matron eye —

And ever to it young Eulalie upturns her violet eye.

 


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[[This version gives the text as originally printed, with indications for Poe’s changes]]

Eulalie

I dwelt alone

In a world of moan,

And my soul was a stagnant tide

Till the fair and gentle Eulalie became my >>smil<< <blushing> bride —

Till the yellow-haired young Eulalie became my smiling bride.

 

And ah! less bright

The stars of the night

Than the eyes of the radiant girl,

And never a flake

Their lustre can make

Of the vapor and gold and pearl

Can vie with the sweet young Eulalie’s most unregarded curl —

Can compare with the bright-eyed Eulalie’s most humble and careless curl.

 

Now Doubt — now Pain

Come never again,

For her soul gives me sigh for sigh,

And all day long

Shines bright and strong

Astarté within the sky,

And ever to it dear Eulalie upturns her matron eye —

And ever to it young Eulalie upturns her violet eye.

 


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Notes:

In the manuscript, two lines are longer than would fit on the actual page. For line 12, the word “curl —” is squeezed in at the at the end of the previous line; and for line 13, the words “and careless curl.” are squeezed in at the end of the subsequent line. These anomalies have not been reproduced in the texts above.

This manuscript was once owned by Poe’s friend, Henry Beck Hirst. It is now in the Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin. Mabbott (Poems, 1:348) appears to assign the date of 1844 based on several facts. The text suggests an earlier form than that published in the American Review of July 1845. Poe left Philadelphia early in 1844, and Mabbott therefore presumes that it was given to Hirst before Poe and his family moved to New York. Hirst published a poem called “Eulalie Vere” in The Coming of the Mammoth, a copy of which was inscribed to Poe as “June 1845.” The same poem had been printed in Snowden’s Ladies’ Companion for  June 1843, but with the title “Elenor Long.” The publication in 1845 of Hirst’s poem suggests that he had seen Poe’s poem prior to publication in the American Review, but after his own poem was published in June 1843.

Because it was probably a compositional draft of the poem, from which Poe would have made the fair copy for publication, the manuscript does not have a byline. A note written in brown ink at the top of the page, in an unknown hand but possibly by Hirst, reads “Original MS of Edgar Allan Poe.”

 

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[S:1 - MS, 1843] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - Poems - Eulalie [Text-01]