Text: Burton R. Pollin, “The Broadway Journal: Advertisements and Publicity Notes (Introduction),” The Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe — Vol. IV: Broadway Journal (Annotations) (1986), p. xl (This material is protected by copyright)


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[page xl:]

TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS: EDITORIAL CORRECTION OF THE TEXT OF VOLUME 3

The 800 pages of the Broadway Journal were not, by any means, models of printing accuracy and care. A weekly magazine, densely printed on its sixteen pages, in two columns, can scarcely be expected to be punctilious and sedulously proofread. These and other factors, such as the lack of an adequate, full-time staff, guaranteed a large number of errors, both in the quality of the editor-contributor’s copy and in the page proofs. Moreover, the changes in the printer were not helpful to high standards. Finally, the deterioration of the type itself, apparently not consistently replaced for worn letters or other equipment, led to an increasingly defective letter press, as the list below indicates. Rather than present Poe’s text in this difficult, even distracting guise, I felt it necessary to make basic editorial corrections, always recording the original form for the scholar. The determination of an error needing correction is sometimes a problem, of course, since an apparent error may really be an author’s idiosyncrasy which needs annotation rather than correction. This is true, for example, of Poe’s use of the dieresis over the first rather than the normal second of two sounded vowels. I have discussed this [page xlvi:] fully in The Brevities, pp. xxxviii-xi, and leave this odd usage unchanged, according to Poe’s preference. On the other hand, although the digraph is often misused, as in “coesura” for “caesura” I have changed it to the normally preferred form because I feel certain that the typesetter has misread Poe’s style of writing (see The Brevities, pp. xxxvi-xxxviii).

In general, in the absence of manuscripts, no attempt could be made to differentiate between the errors of Poe the author and those of the typesetter. In large measure, any formal distinction between errors in accidentals and substantive matters has been blunted or lost. My effort has been to present a text that would create as few difficulties for meaningful reading as possible. Needed changes have been made and have been recorded below for reconstruction of the text or for specific scholarly purposes. In general, punctuation has been preserved as printed, based on the usage of that time (e.g., commas within parentheses, quotation marks in the place of italics, commas separating subject from verb in a sentence). Only end-sentence punctuation errors have been clarified (and recorded). Accent marks, even in foreign-tongue words, have been corrected and recorded, especially since they sometimes enable us to read, sound out, or understand a word, sometimes changing a word into a totally new one. Spelling has been checked for contemporary usage and preserved, if then valid, despite our present usage (see Apalachia in 56/58 and 67). On the other hand Poe’s common misspelling of “parrallel” being unsanctioned is corrected. Sometimes a name may be deliberately misspelled, for ironic or rhetorical purposes (146/34) (“Clarke” for “Clark”); this is retained with a note. Sometimes a word may be erroneous in the quoted original. In that event, it may be preserved with a note (as in 18/57: “Alcolyte”). Hyphenations, of course, need not enter into any type of alteration or listing in this volume, for a facsimile text. However, if there should be any doubt about Poe’s use or printing, as when he is rewriting an excerpt quoted, the Word-Index to Poe’s Fiction can settle some problems.

“Broken letters” and low-placed hyphens or dashes have been corrected without being recorded. However, an upside-down letter (“u” for “n”) is corrected and recorded. Some very obvious errors had to be left, without change, simply because of lack of space to make the correction (e.g., “emation / emanation” across two lines, 14/3132).

This raises the question of the manner of correction. For a facsimile text, one cannot retypeset an incorrect line; one can merely splice in a letter or letters, substitute extra ones, or erase or whiten out surplus letters. All these methods were used by the lay-out artist, my helpers, and myself, after all proposed changes were shown on the mock-up pages, recorded in my lists, and verified before [page xlvii:] being changed on the facsimile pages intended for the printer. Various means for changing were employed: eradicating, cutting away letters, pasting better copy over the word or words. Letters were glued onto the text, if possible and needed; small slips with words were sometimes found elsewhere or reconstructed from other letter press and inserted; and spaces between letters and between words were altered if useful. But none of these changes has been made silently — that is, without appearing below. In the following errors, listed by page and line, the original word is placed before the slash and the correction or action (or else “stet”) taken afterward.

TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS

1/12: Royal / Royall stet (see n); 2/48: experiment / experience stet (see n); 8/2: Rosarie / Rosary stet (see n); 9/43: Ambrosianians / Ambrosians; 14/31-32: emation / emanation stet; 16/28: qnite / quite; 17/9: thamselves / themselves; 18/57: Alcolyte / Acolyte stet (see n); 21/60: have been / (repeated); 23/64: wll / will; 24/10: guurd / guard; 30/6: covict / convict; 30/14: those / these; 30/79: specially / specifically probably wrong, but stet; 30/93: madam / madman; 31/9: Pinckney / Pinkney uncorrected (Poe’s habitual error); 33/3: “the” missing at end of line uncorrected (see n); 35/15: panygeric / panegyric; 35/56: villifier / vilifier; 37/25: Petameter / Pentameter; 37/46: do‘nt / don‘t uncorrected; 43/10: practicul / practical; 47/12: anapoest / anapaest; 53/16: occuring / occurring; 54/27: elite / 61ite; 54/33: It / Its; 56/58, 67: Apalachia / Appalachia stet (see n); 57/13: air / hair; 60/42: parrallel / parallel; 63/63: Siil / Still; 63/94: Re uge / Refuge; 64/25: urgentt / urgent; 66/45: genera(X) / general; 69/11: gettlng / getting; 69/23: anapoestic / anapaestic; 75/9: SOMEBODY / SOMEBODY; 77/26: Truman / Trueman; 80/44: Mr. I / Mr. J; 82/10: benefitted / benefited; 83/19: Kuhner / Kuhner; 84/60: and / and; 85/26: desiarble / desirable; 88/33: cathedrá / cathedrâ; 89/8: Merchant’s / Merchants; 91/18: chorusses / choruses; 91/30: chorusses / choruses; 92/14: Cleaveland / Cleveland (?); 92/21: Waverly / Waverley; 92/28: Meravingian / Merovingian; 93/5: Assemblee / Assemblée; 93/20: to to meet / to meet; 93/50: last. / last,; 94/20: parrallel / parallel; 96/49: Diuneford / Dinneford; 98/29: crèation / création; 98/30: on / ou; 98/48: he / the; 98/64: cords / chords; 104/47: Francois / Francois; 104/64: n est / n‘est; 105/4: Rose / Ruse; 105/29: althougH / although; 106/3: Snapp / Stapp stet; 107/4: Snapp / Stapp stet; 107/68: niaseries / niaiseries; 107/70: nearly / newly; 108/1: number / number; 110/48: in(X)roduction / introduction; 111/10: Quincy / Quincey; 112/19: Ethioipan / Ethiopian; 114/14: rusteling / rustling; 115/32: hvae/have; 117/21: Pease / Pearse stet (see n); 118/32: Aud / And; 120/47: [page xlviii:] Claimants / Claimants; 121/46: (form)ng / (form)ing; 122/23: innoculated / inoculated; 122/50: recgnised / recognised; 123/27: Aroundt hee / Around thee; 126/55: anapoest / anapaest; 126/56: Jambic / Iambic; 126/66: coesura caesura; 126/68: excessive and say / excessive, say,; 126/43: effects / affects; 127/4: offspriug / offspring; 128/21: Zchokke’s / Zschokke’s uncorrected (see n); 129/1: Philoemon / Philaemon; 129/37: Philoemon / Philaemon; 130/27: Clazomenoe / Clazomenae; 130/50: Troponius / Trophonius; 131/40: Clazamenoe / Clazomenae; 131/45: hows / shows; 131/48: (narra) / (narra)tive; 131/62: Philoe(mon) / Philae(mon); 132/1: Philoemon / Philaemon; 132/48: intreaty / entreaty; 133/22: (Phi)loemon / (Phi)laemon; 133/50: “Anarcharsis” / “Anacharsis”; 139/55: andmuslin / and muslin; 140/26: havn‘t / haven‘t stet; 142/28: harrangues / harangues; 144/28: Abreviations / Abbreviations; 146/8: Lausaune / Lausanne; 146/34: Headly / Headley; 150/33: Waverly / Waverley; 152/22: guilatining / guillotining; 152/23: simillar / similar; 156/11: palacial / palatial; 156/18: a / at; 156/25: 1 / It; 156/50: on / in; 162/65: Moneddo / Moneddo; 163/22: swept / slept stet (see n); 165/24: coesura / caesura; 165/44: anapoest / anapaest; 165/49: coesura / caesura; 166/39: too / two; 166/61: Scoevola / Scaevola; 167/61: speeimens / specimens; 167/69: as . . . as / as . . .; 169/40: Clarke / Clark stet (see n); 169/45: critick / critique (see n); 171/48: Aenone / Oenone; 171/63: bnt / but; 173/4: dilligent / diligent; 174/68: bnt / but; 174/72: Gotzebue’s / Kotzebue’s; 175/3: Edmont / Egmont; 176/17: berself / herself; 178/22: Chatam / Chatham; 179/29: Profonnd / Profound; 179/38 to / to; 182/60: O‘er all / O‘er all; 183/6: pamplet / pamphlet; 183/56: role / r6le; 185/1: Nothig / Nothing; 185/31: so / to; 185/36: breack / break; 188/37: my / thy stet (see n); 190/56: himsel / himself; 191/29: and / and; 192/1: Encyclopaedia / Encyclopaedia; 193/33: intellectnal / intellectual; 194/56: thanin / than in; 195/3: lofyt / lofty; 196/27: reduced / seduced; 196/27: to / into (see n); 197/38: Athenoeum / Athenaeum; 197/53: Lwei Frauln / Zwei Frauen; 197/53: Wa- / Ha-; 197/60: Daguerreotype / Daguerreotype stet (see n); 204/63: did‘nt / didn‘t; 205/38: Massino / Massimo; 206/8: Cyclopoedia / Cyclopaedia; 207/45: ommissions / omissions; 211/24: dissappear / disappear; 211/66: Qnarterly / Quarterly; 212/10: a critic a / a critic-; 213/14: phrophseied / prophesied; 213/23: Rensselaer / Rensselaer; 213/28: Factary / Factory; 213/32: ii / it; 14/1: T(X)e / The; 214/20: milions / millions; 214/20: milllion / million; 214/37: establisment / establishment; 215/3: aristing / arising; 217/9: for / For; 217/11: Chippendale / Chippindale (see n); 218/52: beiefly / briefly; 219/20: (publish)rs / (publish)ers; 219/23: Kettel’s / Kettell’s; 220/53: intentiou / intention; 221/51: guilty / guilty; 222/55: upsn / upon; 223/37: 1. S. / J. S.; 225/59: mention / mention; 225/62: aurograph / [page xlix:] autograph; 226/57: d(X)testable / detestable; 229/44: reedy / weedy; 234/8: Encyclopdia Encyclopaedia; 234/47: r61es / r61es; 235/4: uneqaul / unequal; 235/57: Senors / Senores(?) stet; 237/53: 1887 / 1837; 237/55: 76 / 74; 242/14: Hall / Hale; 242/28: Merchant’s / Merchants‘; 242/44: be-(because) / be-(cause); 242/55: Huntingdon / Huntington stet (see 243/9); 245/55: issne / issue; 247/19: Humbolt’s / Humboldt’s; 247/20: fist / first; 247/47: Soiree / Soiree; 248/22: Tne / The; 248/26: Cyclopoedia / Cyclopaedia; 249/41: oe‘er / o‘er; 250/53: bsen / been; 251/10: Bhagoat Geeta / Bhagvat Geeta (see n); 251/30: crlour / colour; 251/66: we / ye; 251/69: onr / our; 252/1: Murdock’s / Murdoch’s; 252/3: Rroken / Broken; 253/22: /which / which; 259/9: naratives / narratives; 259/14: Eaery / Every; 262/5: Wheewell / Whewell; 264/31: Embarrasment / Embarrassment; 265/17: Lopez / Lope stet (see 279/12); 269/3: explanatian / explanation; 269/6; Syntatical / Syntactical; 269/40: Cyclopoedia / Cyclopaedia; 269/44: Nnmerous / Numerous; 272/38: Aud / And; 273/1: Ditsen / Ditson; 274/57: cotinuation / continuation; 276/50: Glacono / Giacomo; 278/13: Schlemil / Schlemihl; 279/12: Lopez / Lope; 279/45: beantifully / beautifully; 279/53: ure / are; 279/62: and / and; 280/15: repeatrng / repeating; 281/7: cordailly / cordially; 281/50 papet / paper; 283/21: millionare / millionaire; 285/13: idiosyncratic / idiosyncratic; 285/29: could‘nt / couldn‘t; 286/14: reccollected / recollected; 286/16: reccollect / recollect; 286/23: Willlam’s / William’s; 287/27: Wilhelmmeister / Wilhelm Meister; 287/29: Bensenerto / Benvenuto; 287/33: compldte / complete; 288/45: Lrom / From; 289/49: Cleonaean / Cleonaean; 292/37: orsginality / originality; 294/12: Benevenuto / Benvenuto; 295/45: ttreatise / treatise; 300/27: Poettical / Poetical; 301/36: earried / carried; 302/8: Ruschenberger / Ruschenberger; 303/30: Merchant’s / Merchants‘; 303/43: Merchant’s / Merchants‘; 303/50: anthor / author; 303/53: Merchant’s / Merchants‘; 304/9: Merchant’s / Merchants‘; 305/15: sculptnred / sculptured; 307/55: Monkton / Monckton stet; 312/66: comliest / comeliest; 313/2: cirtical / critical; 320/19-20: plan, produced (repeated) / deleted uncorrected (see n); 320/28: and (and) / and stet; 320/31: father / farther; 320/36: mo(X)e / more; 320/42: (com-)yositions / (com-)positions; 320/45: Mouths / Months; 320/45: Prorpietor / Proprietor; 323/4: but / but; 325/12: in future / in the future; 325/51: timeto / time to; 331/35: anapoestic / anapaestic; 331/35: anapoests / anapaests; 333/43: Chiropedist / Chiropodist; 333/48: Chiropedy / Chiropody; 339/27: Lucitania / Lusitania; 345/21: Huntingdon / Huntington stet; 346/31: Cyclopoedia / Cyclopaedia; 347/20: anapoestic / anapaestic; 349/33: plgrims / pilgrims; 351/53: Worsdworth / Wordsworth; 359/38: Salamanaca / Salamanca; 360/8: Herrman / Herman; 361: Babarities / Barbarities; 361: Elenora / Eleanora; 362: Monseur Eduart’s / Monsieur Edouart’s; [page l:] 364: The Ravens / The Raven; 364: The Pilgrimage to Kevlaar / . . . Kevlaar

(End)

 


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Notes:

None.


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[S:0 - BRP4J, 1986] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Editions - The Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe (B. R. Pollin) (Typographical Errors)