Text: Edgar Allan Poe (ed. Killis Campbell), “Bridal Ballad,” The Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, Ginn and Company, 1917, pp. ???-???


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BRIDAL BALLAD

THE ring is on my hand,

And the wreath is on my brow;

Satins and jewels grand

Are all at my command,

And I am happy now.

And my lord he loves me well;

But, when first he breathed his vow,

I felt my bosom swell —

For the words rang as a knell,

And the voice seemed his who fell

In the battle down the dell,

And who is happy now.

But he spoke to re-assure me,

And he kissed my pallid brow,

While a reverie came o’re me,

And to the church-yard bore me,

And I sighed to him before me,

Thinking him dead D’Elormie,

“Oh, I am happy now!”

And thus the words were spoken,

And this the plighted vow,

And, though my faith be broken,

And, though my heart be broken,

Behold the golden token

That proves me happy now!

Would God I could awaken!

For I dream I know not how,

And my soul is sorely shaken

Lest an evil step be taken, —

Lest the dead who is forsaken

May not be happy now.

 


[[Early Text]]

The text printed in the Union Magazine for December, 1849, inasmuch as it differs radically from the final text, is given here in its entirety.

THE BELLS. — A SONG

The bells! — hear the bells!

The merry wedding bells!

The little silver bells!

How fairy-like a melody there swells

From the silver tinkling cells

Of the bells, bells, bells!

Of the bells!

The bells! — ah, the bells!

The heavy iron bells!

Hear the tolling of the bells!

Hear the knells!

How horrible a monody there floats

From their throats —

From their deep-toned throats!

How I shudder at the notes

From the melancholy throats

Of the bells, bells, bells —

Of the bells —

 


[[Variants]]

[The following variants appear at the bottom of page 100:]

Title Ballad (S. L. M., S. E. P.), Song of the Newly-Wedded (S.M.).

3 After this line, S. L. M. inserts the following:

And many a rood of land.

8 He has loved me long and well (S. L. M., S. E. P.).

7 But, when first: And, when (S. L. M.), But, when (S. E. P.).

9 rang as a knell: were his who fell (S. L. M.); as: like (S. E. P., B.J.).

10 Omitted in S. L. M.

13 But: And (S. L. M.).

[The following variants appear at the bottom of page 101:]

15 While: But (S. L. M.).

18 Omitted in S.L.M.

19 After this line, S. L. M. inserts the following:

And thus they said I plighted

An irrevocable vow —

And my friends are all delighted

That his love I have requited —

And my mind is much benighted

If I am not happy now!

Lo! the ring is on my hand,

And the wreath is on my brow —

Satins and jewels grand,

And many a rood of land,

Are all at my command,

And I must be happy now!

20 I have spoken — I have spoken (S. L. M.), It was spoken — it was spoken (S. E. P.).

21 They have registered the vow (S. L. M.), Quick they registered the vow (S. E. P.).

24, 25 First inserted in the text in the Lorimer Graham copy of 1845.

[The following variants appear at the bottom of page 102:]

32 Lest: And (S. L. M., S. E. P.).

 


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Notes:

None.

 

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[S:0 - KCP, 1917] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - Bridal Ballad (ed. K. Campbell, 1917)