Text: Elizabeth Wiley, “Concordance (THING through THOU),” Concordance of the Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe, (1989), pp. 561-570 (This material is protected by copyright)


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TEXT   V     PAGE    LINE       POEM
 
THING ( 26 23)
Aye — the same thing heritage hath giv’n 1 27 33 TAMA
Each hindering thing: 1 109 93 ALAAR
To while away — forbidden thing! 1 128 19C ROMG
Over every drowsy thing — 1 140 24 FAIRY1
O’er every drowsy thing 1 140 24A FAIRY1
Like — almost any thing — 1 141 33 FAIRY1
(Called any thing, its meaning is the same) 1 148 15 ELIZA
To while away — forbidden thing! 1 157 43 INTRO
So like a thing alive you know, 1 161 16 FAIRY2
Are — not like any thing of ours — 1 199 7 CITYA
Sleep on, sleep on, like sculptured thing, 1 224 5 SLEEP
Be every thing which now thou art 1 235 3 THOUA
Being every thing which now thou art, 1 235 3BCDG THOUJ
Besides you’re right — Oh! honesty’s the thing! 1 254 53 POLI
To my cousin Alessandra? Honor’s the thing! 1 255 77 POLI
Hast thou a crucifix fit for this thing? 1 264 97 POLI
The unsatisfactory and ideal thing. 1 273 32 POLI
A different thing — a different thing indeed! 1 278 70 POLI
Of nothing which might warrant thee in this thing, 1 281 54 POLI
And sociable, and all that kind of thing 1 283 50 POLI
And all that sort of thing — ha! ha! ha! ha! 1 285 135 POLI
A blood-red thing that writhes from out 1 326 27 WORM
“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil! — 1 368 85 RAVEN
“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil! — 1 368 91 RAVEN
From the thing that lies hidden in these wolds — 1 418 100 ULA
THINGS ( 35 26)
To take things seriously or all in jest; 1 9 12 TEMP
That things should stare us boldly in the face, 1 10 32 TEMP
Two separate yet most intimate things. 1 50 150 TAMF
From the most undefiled things; 1 53 230 TAMF
Two separate — yet most intimate things. 1 57 127 TAMH
From the most unpolluted things, 1 61 235 TAMH
From the most undefiled things, 1 61 235E TAMH
To the delirious eye more lovely things 1 69 32 DREA
On things around him with a ray 1 79 7 ADRE
Who alterest all things with thy peering eyes. 1 91 2 SCI
Who alterest all things with thy piercing eyes. 1 91 2BC SCI
All Nature speaks, and ev’n ideal things 1 104 128 ALAAR
Here Nature speaks, and ev’n ideal things 1 104 128BCE ALAAR
There Nature speaks, and even ideal things 1 104 128D ALAAR
Here Nature speaks, and even ideal things 1 104 128F ALAAR
Yet silence came upon material things — 1 108 64 ALAAR
All hindering things: 1 109 93F ALAAR
Are the music of things — 1 110 126 ALAAR
To while away — forbidden things! 1 128 19 ROMG
(Never-contented things!) 1 141 44 FAIRY1
(The unbelieving things!) 1 141 44CF FAIRY1
“Always write first things uppermost in the heart.” 1 148 16 ELIZA
And all the listening things) 1 174 13 ISRA
And the other listening things) 1 176 17 ISRG
All things lovely — are not they 1 191 5 NISA
All about unhappy things: 1 192 14 NISA
Sweet daughter! in Heaven. Think of eternal things! 1 263 74 POLI
Throw over all things a gloom. 1 274 64 POLI
Throw over all things a shade. 1 274 64Ax POLI
But evil things, in robes of sorrow, 1 316 33 HAUNT
There are some qualities — some incorporate things, 1 322 1 SILE
At bidding of vast formless things 1 325 13 WORM
At bidding of vast shadowy things 1 325 13A WORM
Through all the flimsy things we see at once 1 425 3 DUNCE
And in an instant all things disappeared. 1 446 29 TOHEL
THINK ( 46 44)
Yet still I think these worse than them a little. 1 9 8 TEMP
For he does think, although I’m oft in doubt 1 11 79 TEMP
For he does think, though I am oft in doubt 1 11 79C TEMP
I think he’ll take this likeness to himself, 1 12 89 TEMP
Thou can’st not — would’st not dare to think 1 30 103 TAMA
I will not madly think that power 1 45 3 TAMF
Still think my terrors but the thunder cloud, 1 104 136 ALAAR
I laugh to think how poor 1 131 37 SHOULD
Which I think extravagant: 1 141 38 FAIRY1
Thrilling to think, poor child of sin! 1 188 59 IRENE2
Nor thrill to think, poor child of sin! 1 188 59DE IRENE2
Think that he deem’d thy charms divine; 1 226 16 FANNY
RUPERT You think the Count Castiglione altered — 1 249 30 POLI
I think so too. He was, not long ago, 1 249 31 POLI
Think you, the consummation of these nuptials? 1 250 55 POLI
Ere this mischance. I cannot bear to think 1 250 60 POLI
And pure as beautiful, how could she think — 1 254 46 POLI
What would San Ozzo think? I have no right 1 255 71 POLI
Only to think of that! a tub of ashes! 1 257 121 POLI
“I think not so — her infelicity 1 261 18 POLI
Sweet daughter! in Heaven. Think of eternal things! 1 263 74 POLI
MONK. Think of thy precious soul! 1 263 82 POLI
LALAGE. Think of my early days! — think of my father 1 263 83 POLI
And mother in Heaven! think of our quiet home, 1 263 84 POLI
Think of my little sisters! — think of them! 1 263 86 POLI
And think of me! — think of my trusting love 1 263 87 POLI
And confidence — his vows — my ruin — think — think 1 263 88 POLI
Most singular! I could not think it possible 1 265 25 POLI
I am indeed! — but after all I think 1 276 20 POLI
For the better I think — indeed I’m sure of it — 1 276 26 POLI
Well! — I will think of it — I will not send it. 1 280 40 POLI
Think not to fly me thus. Do thou prepare 1 282 85 POLI
Poor soul he’s gone! But now I think of it 1 284 78 POLI
I think there would be more of dignity 1 284 85 POLI
For now, upon consideration, I think 1 284 91 POLI
One of the last importance. Do you not think 1 284 97 POLI
Do you not think it were more fitting, Sir, 1 284 99 POLI
Could you not, think you, by a desperate effort, 1 285 111 POLI
And think that these weak lines are written by him — 1 400 16 MLS
By him who, as he pens them, thrills to think 1 400 17 MLS
I cannot speak — I cannot even think — 1 407 24 MARA
I cannot write — I cannot speak or think, 1 408 19 MARB
THINKING ( 9 9)
I’ve been a thinking, isn’t that the phrase? 1 9 9 TEMP
I’ve been a thinking, whether it were best 1 9 11 TEMP
Stay! — tell him I’ve been thinking — 1 257 117 POLI
I’ve been thinking 1 257 117 POLI
And little given to thinking. 1 259 53 POLI
(Thinking him dead D’Elormie,) 1 309 18 BRIDF
Fancy unto fancy, thinking 1 367 70 RAVEN
Thinking me dead. 1 456 18 ANNIE
Thinking me dead: — 1 459 94 ANNIE
THINKS ( 1 1)
He thinks I’ll have him — but oh no! — I couldn’t. 1 277 46 POLI
THIRST ( 7 6)
Of weary pilgrimage and burning thirst, 1 228 5 COLIS
(Thirst for the springs of lore that in thee lie,) 1 228 6 COLIS
(Thirst for the springs of love that in thee lie,) 1 228 6A COLIS
Of weary pilgrimage, and burning thirst 1 286 6 POLI
(Thirst for the springs of lore that in thee lie) 1 286 7 POLI
Torture of thirst 1 457 34 ANNIE
That quenches all thirst: — 1 457 38 ANNIE
THIS ( 185 157)
This is a question which, oh Heaven, withdraw 1 10 19 TEMP
As this for a neat, frisky counter-hopper; 1 10 48 TEMP
I think he’ll take this likeness to himself, 1 12 89 TEMP
That I have call’d thee at this hour: 1 27 6 TAMA
The gay wall of this gaudy tower 1 27 15 TAMA
I had not thought, until this hour 1 27 17 TAMA
Rome to the Caesar — this to me; 1 27 34 TAMA
Ev’n then, who deem’d this iron heart 1 29 86 TAMA
Which ev’n upon this perilous brink 1 30 105 TAMA
With which this aching breast is fraught) 1 32 184 TAMA
Which knows (believe me at this time, 1 32 189 TAMA
Ev’n then who deem’d this iron heart 1 40 86 TAMB
Which, ev’n to this impassion’d mind, 1 41 92 TAMB
Rome to the Caesar — this to me? 1 46 35 TAMF
Rome to the Caesar — this to me? 1 54 31 TAMH
E’en then who knew this iron heart 1 56 73 TAMH
So like its own above that, to this hour, 1 101 57 ALAAR
The dimness of this world: that greyish green 1 106 29 ALAAR
But what is this? — it cometh — and it brings 1 107 48 ALAAR
Within the centre of this hall to breathe 1 108 56F ALAAR
Light, brazen rays, this golden star unto! 1 114 240 ALAAR
By this clear stream, 1 159 5 MYST
Up like a dog-star in this bower — 1 161 13 FAIRY2
And this ray is a fairy ray — 1 162 24 FAIRY2
Yes, Heaven is thine: but this 1 174 34 ISRA
And a stormier note than this would swell 1 175 43 ISRA
And a loftier note than this would swell 1 175 43B ISRA
Yes, Heaven is thine; but this 1 176 40 ISRG
While a bolder note than this might swell 1 177 50 ISRG
“And wave this crimson canopy, 1 184 35 IRENE1
“For strangely — fearfully in this hall 1 184 39 IRENE1
This window open to the night? 1 187 19 IRENE2
This lattice open to the night? 1 187 19DEF IRENE2
And this all solemn silentness! 1 187 36 IRENE2
This chamber changed for one more holy, 1 188 40 IRENE2
This bed being changed for one more holy, 1 188 40DE IRENE2
This chamber chang’d for one more holy, 1 188 40F IRENE2
This bed for one more melancholy, 1 188 41 IRENE2
This room for one more melancholy, 1 188 41DE IRENE2
Therefore, to thee this night 1 207 37 PAEAN
These vague entablatures — this crumbling frieze — 1 229 28 COLIS
These vague entablatures — this broken frieze — 1 229 28A-DFK COLIS
These shattered cornices — this wreck — this ruin — 1 229 29 COLIS
These shatter’d cornices — this wreck — this ruin — 1 229 29FGHK COLIS
(Jacinta tells me this). 1 249 49 POLI
(Jacinta tells me this) and listens aghast 1 249 49Ax POLI
Ere this mischance. I cannot bear to think 1 250 60 POLI
UGO. This wine’s not bad! gentlemen why d’ye blame 1 250 62 POLI
My master in this matter? very good (hiccup) wine! 1 250 63 POLI
This broach — these pearls — 1 251 96 POLI
JACINTH. These emeralds and this topaz! — 1 251 98 POLI
I should so grieve about this little matter 1 255 67 POLI
This every-day occurrence. Marry her — no! 1 255 68 POLI
This air is most oppressive! — Madam — the Duke! 1 259 37 POLI
You dog! and make it up, I say, this minute! 1 259 40 POLI
Kiss her and make it up, I say, this minute! 1 259 40Ax POLI
ALESSANDRA. I have heard much of this Politian. 1 259 51 POLI
“Bore a bright golden flower, but not i’ this soil!” 1 260 6 POLI
Jacinta! This is a far sterner story 1 261 20Ax POLI
LALAGE. Poor Lalage! — and is it come to this? 1 262 56 POLI
MONK. Daughter, this zeal is well! 1 264 95 POLI
LALAGE. Father, this zeal is anything but well! 1 264 96 POLI
Hast thou a crucifix fit for this thing? 1 264 97 POLI
This sacred vow? Not that — Oh no! — no! — no! 1 264 99 POLI
All arm in arm we met this very man 1 265 29 POLI
Father! this is the Earl Politian, Earl 1 266 49 POLI
Of Leicester in Great Britain, this his friend 1 266 50 POLI
BENITO. This way my lord! 1 267 67 POLI
Now this is very strange! Castiglione! 1 267 74 POLI
This way, my son, I wish to speak with thee. 1 267 75 POLI
Proceeds from yonder lattice — this way you can see it 1 269 62Ax POLI
Does it not? unto this palace of the Duke. 1 270 64 POLI
Now be this Fancy, by Heaven, or be it Fate, 1 271 110 POLI
This mockery is most cruel! — most cruel indeed! 1 272 4 POLI
Than in thy cause to scoff at this same glory 1 273 40 POLI
This time and dark — one, two, three, four, five, six! 1 276 9 POLI
Have been born without a head. Heigho! what’s this? 1 277 48 POLI
(During this part of the soliloquy 1 278 21d POLI
“Jacinta, get me this” — “D’ye hear? — bring that” 1 278 63 POLI
“Begone I say this minute — get out you viper. 1 278 78 POLI
I’ll turn about and let him have it — who’s this 1 278 81 POLI
POLITIAN. This weakness grows upon me. I am faint, 1 279 1 POLI
All this is very true. When saw you, sir, 1 279 23 POLI
A heaven so calm as this — so utterly free 1 280 26 POLI
POLITIAN. Now this is true — 1 280 30 POLI
Unto this man, that I, the Earl of Leicester, 1 280 34 POLI
Of nothing which might warrant thee in this thing, 1 281 54 POLI
Shall I be baffled thus? — now this is well; 1 281 65 POLI
CASTIGLIONE. Ha! — coward! — this may not be! 1 281 71 POLI
That in this deep humiliation I perish. 1 282 78 POLI
CASTIGLIONE. Now this indeed is just! 1 282 92 POLI
CASTIGLIONE. Now this — now this is just! 1 282 92B POLI
Being in the dumps about this little matter 1 283 65 POLI
I’ll make this idiot go and tell the Count 1 283 70 POLI
Hath now departed this life.” 1 284 90 POLI
I have — departed this life. 1 284 92 POLI
All rules of etiquette. This is a matter 1 284 95 POLI
Paugh! this will never do! — why, bless me, Sir, 1 285 113 POLI
Now, Sir, this leg — a little farther — that’s it! 1 285 126 POLI
This life — you’re dead, deceased, defunct, 1 285 134 POLI
These vague entablatures: this broken frieze 1 286 35 POLI
These shattered cornices, this wreck, this ruin, 1 287 36 POLI
The bridegroom — gets this night hence! 1 287 59Ax POLI
I’ll mar this bridal if at the altar’s foot 1 287 61 POLI
I’ll mar this wedding if at the altar’s foot 1 287 61Ax POLI
And this the plighted vow; 1 309 21 BRIDF
(This — all this — was in the olden 1 316 11 HAUNT
Of thy firm TRUTH may say — “Lo! this is writ 1 328 2 STYL
What ho! What ho! this fellow is dancing mad; 1 329 1 WHAT
From this ultimate dim Thule. 1 344 20.6A ROUTE
From this ultimate dim Thule. 1 344 38.6A ROUTE
From this ultimate dim Thule. 1 345 56 ROUTE
From this ultimate dim Thule. 1 345 56D ROUTE
Only this and nothing more.” 1 365 6 RAVEN
This it is and nothing more.” 1 365 18 RAVEN
Only this and nothing more.” 1 365 180 RAVEN
This I whispered, and an echo 1 366 29 RAVEN
Merely this and nothing more. 1 366 30 RAVEN
and this mystery explore — 1 366 34 RAVEN
and this mystery explore; — 1 366 35 RAVEN
Then this ebony bird beguiling 1 366 43 RAVEN
Then this ebon bird beguiling 1 366 430 RAVEN
Much I marvelled this ungainly 1 366 49 RAVEN
what this ominous bird of yore — 1 367 70 RAVEN
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, 1 367 71 RAVEN
This I sat engaged in guessing, 1 367 73 RAVEN
This and more I sat divining, 1 368 75 RAVEN
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe 1 368 83 RAVEN
and forget this lost Lenore!” 1 368 83 RAVEN
Let me quaff this kind nepenthe 1 368 83ACE RAVEN
on this desert land enchanted — 1 368 87 RAVEN
On this home by Horror haunted — 1 368 88 RAVEN
Tell this soul with sorrow laden 1 368 93 RAVEN
This wonderful plan, without danger or loss, 1 378 5 WALL
And hold this maxim all life long, 1 384 11 KING
Beyond this bounded earthly clime, 1 386 10 FSO
And this the life thy spirit live, 1 386 26 FSO
For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes, 1 389 1 VALG
Upon this page, enwrapped from every reader. 1 389 4 VALA
Upon this page, enwrapped from every reader. 1 389 4F VALG
Search narrowly this rhyme! — which holds a treasure 1 389 SF VALG
And yet there is in this no Gordian knot 1 389 10 VALA
Ah, this you’d have no trouble in descrying 1 389 19 VALA
All this you’d have no trouble in descrying 1 389 19C VALA
And yet there is in this no Gordian knot 1 390 10 VALG
Enwritten upon this page whereon are peering 1 390 13F VALG
This standing motionless upon the golden 1 407 26 MARA
This standing motionless upon the golden 1 408 21 MARB
Said — “Sadly this star I mistrust — 1 417 52 ULA
I replied — “This is nothing but dreaming. 1 417 61 ULA
Let us on, by this tremulous light! 1 417 62 ULA
Let us bathe in this crystalline light! 1 417 63 ULA
On the door of this legended tomb?” 1 418 79 ULA
On this very night of last year, 1 418 86 ULA
On this night, of all nights in the year, 1 418 89 ULA
Well I know, now, this dim lake of Auber — 1 418 91 ULA
This misty mid region of Weir: — 1 418 92 ULA
Well I know, now, this dank tarn of Auber — 1 418 93 ULA
This ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir.” 1 418 94 ULA
This sinfully scintillant planet 1 419 103 ULA
But this is, now, — you may depend upon it — 1 425 12 DUNCE
That smiled and died in this parterre, enchanted 1 445 15 TOHEL
Was it not Fate, that, on this July midnight — 1 445 21 TOHEL
(Ah, bear in mind this garden was enchanted!) 1 446 30 TOHEL
Take this kiss upon the brow! 1 451 1 TAKE
Take this kiss upon thy brow! 1 451 1C TAKE
This knight so bold — 1 463 8 ELDOR
This land of Eldorado?” 1 463 18 ELDOR
And this maiden she lived with no other thought 1 477 5 LEEA
In this kingdom by the sea; 1 477 8 LEEA
And this was the reason that, long ago, 1 477 13 LEEA
In this kingdom by the sea, 1 477 14 LEEA
In this kingdom by the sea. 1 477 20 LEEA
And this maiden she lived with no other thought 1 478 5 LEEE
In this kingdom by the sea, 1 478 8 LEEE
In this kingdom by the sea) 1 478 24 LEEA
And this was the reason that, long ago, 1 479 13 LEEE
In this kingdom by the sea, 1 479 14 LEEE
In this kingdom by the sea. 1 479 20 LEEE
In this kingdom by the sea) 1 479 24 LEEE
THISTLE ( 3 2)
Waved to the wind, now wave the reed and thistle! 1 228 21 COLIS
Wav’d to the wind, now wave the reed and thistle! 1 228 21AC COLIS
Waved to the wind, now wave the reed and thistle: 1 286 26 POLI
THITHER ( 4 4)
And Valisnerian lotus thither flown 1 102 74 ALAAR
Fly thither with me? There Care shall be forgotten, 1 274 76 POLI
Fly thither with me? 1 275 86 POLI
And hither and thither fly — 1 325 11 WORM
THITHERWARD ( 1 1)
Headlong thitherward o’er the starry sea — 1 115 256 ALAAR
THO’ ( 22 21)
Strange light upon me, tho’ it were 1 29 73 TAMA
Hath fix’d my soul, tho’ unforgiv’n 1 30 106 TAMA
Tho’ then its passion could not be: 1 30 111 TAMA
Tho’ lov’d, and loving — let it pass. — 1 36 298 TAMA
Dim! tho’ looking on all bright! 1 37 322 TAMA
Strange light upon me, tho’ it were 1 40 73 TAMB
Nor love, Ada! tho’ it were thine. 1 48 95 TAMF
What tho’ the moon — the white moon — 1 52 207 TAMF
What tho’ the moon — the white moon 1 60 201 TAMH
And, tho’ my tread was soft and low, 1 60 216 TAMH
Yes! tho’ that long dream were of hopeless sorrow, 1 68 4 DREA
I have been happy — tho’ but in a dream. 1 69 27 DREA
I have been happy — tho’ in a dream. 1 69 27A DREA
For the night, tho’ clear, shall frown: 1 71 11 SPIRA
The night — tho’ clear — shall frown — 1 72 11 SPIRD
I care not tho’ it perish 1 75 19 IMIT
Tho’ not with Faith — with godliness — whose throne 1 78 30 STAN
Tho’ the beings whom thy Nesace, 1 103 102 ALAAR
“What tho’ in worlds which sightless cycles run, 1 104 133 ALAAR
What tho’ in worlds which own a single sun 1 105 139 ALAAR
Where, tho’ the garish lights that fly 1 157 13 INTRO
Yet tho’ no holy rays come down 1 199 20 CITYA
THOSE ( 40 37)
Those eyes won’t turn on anything like men. 1 11 68 TEMP
Those won’t turn on anything like men. 1 11 68D TEMP
The hallow’d mem’ry of those years 1 31 136 TAMA
Embrac’d two hamlets — those our own — 1 33 222 TAMA
Of those, who hardly will conceive 1 34 258 TAMA
To those whose spirits hark’n) as one 1 38 373 TAMA
For in those days it was my lot 1 47 79 TAMF
For mid that sunshine and those smiles, 1 49 130 TAMF
To those whose spirits harken) as one 1 52 204 TAMF
For ’mid that sunshine, and those smiles, 1 57 103 TAMH
To those whose spirits harken) as one 1 60 198 TAMH
Those thoughts I would controul, 1 75 13 IMIT
In beauty by our God, to those alone 1 78 26 STAN
As in those gardens where the day 1 99 3 ALAAR
The breath of those kisses 1 109 86 ALAAR
Those kisses of true love 1 109 90 ALAAR
To those who hear not for their beating hearts. 1 112 177 ALAAR
Of which those butterflies, 1 141 41 FAIRY1
In vain those words from thee or L. E. L. 1 149 3 ACROS
But dreams — of those who dream as I, 1 158 56 INTRO
Like those Nicean barks of yore, 1 165 2 HELF
Like those Nicean barks of yore, 1 165 2ABJ HELF
With those unusual strings. 1 174 16 ISRA
Of those unusual strings. 1 176 22 ISRG
With those unusual strings. 1 176 22C ISRG
Those flowers that say (ah hear them now!) 1 184 53 IRENE1
Ah, by no wind are stirred those trees 1 195 14 NISE
Ah, by no wind those clouds are driven 1 196 17 NISE
Gave you those jewels! 1 251 85 POLI
Be always throwing those jewels in my teeth. 1 262 47 POLI
POLITIAN. Touching those letters, Sir, 1 266 S9 POLI
Touching those letters, Sir, I wot not of them. 1 267 61 POLI
With those words upon thy lips — O, speak to me! 1 275 94 POLI
Even unto death. Before those whom thou lovest — 1 282 89 POLI
To those pure orbs, your heart to learn, 1 380 2 KATE
To breathe the incense of those slumbering roses? 1 445 24 TOHEL
How my heart beats in coupling those two words!) 1 445 27 TOHEL
Upon those crystalline, celestial spheres! 1 446 43 TOHEL
Of those who were older than we — 1 478 28 LEEA
Of those who were older than we — 1 479 28 LEEE
THOU ( 171 145)
Shame said’st thou? Aye I did inherit 1 27 24 TAMA
Thou can’st not — would’st not dare to think 1 30 103 TAMA
Thou — and the nothing of a name. 1 32 178 TAMA
Thou — & the nothing of a name. 1 42 178 TAMB
Hear thou the secret of a spirit 1 45 13 TAMF
Was giant-like — so thou, my mind! 1 47 61 TAMF
O human love! thou spirit given 1 51 183 TAMF
Know thou the secret of a spirit 1 54 13 TAMH
Was giantlike — so thou my mind. 1 55 57CE TAMH
O, human love! thou spirit given, 1 59 177 TAMH
— But its thought thou can’st not banish. 1 71 22 SPIRA
Now are thoughts thou shalt not banish — 1 72 19 SPIRD
Now are thoughts thou can’st not banish — 1 72 19B SPIRD
Thou bearest in Heav’n at night, 1 74 20 STAR
Where wand’rest thou my soul? 1 79 .4A ADRE
The venom thou hast pour’d on me — 1 81 11 HAPP
Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art! 1 91 1 SCI
Science! meet daughter of Old Time thou art! 1 91 1A-E SCI
Why preyest thou thus upon the poet’s heart, 1 91 3 SCI
Why prey’st thou thus upon the poet’s heart, 1 91 3AD-H SCI
Why prey’st thou thus upon thy poet’s heart, 1 91 3BC SCI
Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car? 1 91 9 SCI
Hast thou not dragg’d Diana from her car? 1 91 9A-E SCI
Hast thou not spoilt a story in each star? 1 91 11F SCI
Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood, 1 91 12 SCI
Thou hast bound many eyes 1 110 116 ALAAR
Thou hast not seen my brow, 1 131 28 SHOULD
Thou art an emblem of the glow 1 134 3 TOPO
“Love not” — thou sayest it in so sweet a way: 1 149 2 ACROS
Thou wert my dream 1 159 2 MYST
Thou! thy truest type of grief 1 160 26 MYST
Thou! thy framing is so holy 1 160 28 MYST
Now thou art dress’d for paradise! 1 161 4 FAIRY2
Thou art not, therefore, wrong 1 174 24 ISRA
Therefore, thou art not wrong, 1 176 29 ISRG
Thou art not, therefore, wrong, 1 176 29CDE ISRG
“O lady sweet! how camest thou here? 1 184 26 IRENE1
“Sure thou art come o’er far-off seas, 1 184 29 IRENE1
Oh, lady dear, hast thou no fear? 1 187 30 IRENE2
Why and what art thou dreaming here? 1 187 31 IRENE2
Sure thou art come o’er far-off seas, 1 187 32 IRENE2
Thou died’st in thy life’s June — 1 206 29A PAEAN
But thou did’st not die too fair: 1 206 30A PAEAN
Thou did’st not die too soon, 1 206 31A PAEAN
Thou wast that all to me, love, 1 214 1 PARA
Thou wast all to me, love, 1 214 1A PARA
Thou wast all that to me, love, 1 214 1KMP PARA
Young Hope! thou did’st arise 1 214 88 PARA
Oh starry Hope! thou didst arise 1 214 8H PARA
Maria! thou hast heard my hymn! 1 217 2 HYMN
Majestic, beautiful art thou; 1 224 6 SLEEP
But that in heav’n thou had’st thy birth, 1 224 11 SLEEP
Would’st thou be loved? then let thy heart 1 235 1 THOUA
Thou wouldst be loved? — then let thy heart 1 235 1 THOUF
Thou wouldst be loved? — then let thy heart 1 235 1 THOUJ
Be every thing which now thou art 1 235 3 THOUA
Being everything which now thou art, 1 235 3 THOUF
Being everything which now thou art, 1 235 3 THOUJ
Being every thing which now thou art, 1 235 3BCDG THOUJ
And nothing which thou art not: 1 235 4 THOUA
Be nothing which thou art not. 1 235 4 THOUF
Be nothing which thou art not. 1 235 4 THOUJ
ALESSANDRA. Thou art sad, Castiglione. 1 257 1 POLI
A few days more, thou knowest, my Alessandra, 1 257 3 POLI
ALESSANDRA. Methinks thou hast a singular way of showing 1 257 5 POLI
Why didst thou sigh so deeply? 1 257 7 POLI
ALESSANDRA. Thou didst. Thou art not well. 1 257 11 POLI
Thou has indulged 1 257 11 POLI
Will ruin thee! thou art already altered — 1 258 14 POLI
ALESSANDRA. Thou wilt — thou must. 1 258 23 POLI
Attend thou also more 1 258 23 POLI
Attend thou also somewhat more 1 258 23A2x POLI
ALESSANDRA. Thou — thou must. 1 258 23AB POLI
To a becoming carriage — much thou wantest 1 258 28 POLI
ALESSANDRA Thou mockest me, sir! 1 258 30 POLI
Sir Count! what art thou dreaming? he’s not well! 1 258 33 POLI
LALAGE. Jacinta! is it thou? 1 260 1 POLI
LALAGE. Wilt thou, my good Jacinta, be so kind 1 261 28 POLI
LALAGE What didst thou say, Jacinta? Have I done aught 1 261 36 POLI
For thou hast served me long and ever been 1 261 38 POLI
LALAGE. What didst thou say, Jacinta? Now I bethink me 1 262 41 POLI
Thou hast not spoken lately of thy wedding. 1 262 42 POLI
Thou needest, Jacinta? 1 262 45 POLI
Whom thou hast cherished to sting thee to the soul! 1 262 58 POLI
Fair mirror and true! now tell me (for thou canst) 1 262 61 POLI
A tale — a pretty tale — and heed thou not 1 262 62 POLI
thou liest not! 1 263 70 POLI
Thou hast no end to gain — no heart to break — 1 263 71 POLI
Thou true — he false! — false! — false! 1 263 73 POLI
MONK. Refuge thou hast, 1 263 73 POLI
Yet stay! yet stay! — what was it thou saidst of prayer 1 263 90 POLI
And penitence? Didst thou not speak of faith 1 263 91 POLI
Hast thou a crucifix fit for this thing? 1 264 97 POLI
Thou must not — nay indeed, indeed, thou shalt not 1 267 2 POLI
And live, for now thou diest! 1 267 5 POLI
Command me, sir! what wouldst thou have me do? 1 268 9 POLI
And her the trumpet-tongued thou wilt not hear 1 268 23 POLI
Didst thou not hear it then? 1 268 26 POLI
POLITIAN. Thou heardst it not! — 1 268 27 POLI
For in the eternal city thou shalt do me 1 268 34 POLI
BALDAZZAR. Thou speakest a fearful riddle 1 269 38 POLI
Sitteth in Heaven. — Hist! hist! thou canst not say 1 269 50 POLI
Thou hearest not now, Baldazzar? 1 269 51 POLI
Pol: What didst thou say? 1 270 80Ax POLI
LALAGE. And dost thou speak of love 1 272 1 POLI
To me, Politian? — dost thou speak of love 1 272 2 POLI
Thou .-skeet me if I could speak of love, ’ 1 272 10 POLI
Thou .1,skest me that — and thus I answer thee — 1 272 12 POLI
Thou dost forget thyself, remembering me! 1 272 23 POLI
Art thou not Lalage and I Politian? 1 273 33 POLI
Do I not love — art thou not beautiful — 1 273 34 POLI
LALAGE. Why dost thou pause, Politian? 1 273 46 POLI
LALAGE. Why dost thou pause, Politian? 1 273 49 POLI
Thou lovest me, and in my heart of hearts 1 273 51 POLI
I feel thou lovest me truly. 1 273 52 POLI
And lovest thou me? 1 273 53 POLI
POLITIAN. My Lalage — my love! why art thou moved? 1 274 59 POLI
Why dost thou turn so pale? Not Conscience’ self, 1 274 60 POLI
Why dost thou tremble thus? Not Conscience’ self, 1 274 60Ax POLI
Far less a shadow which thou likenest to it, 1 274 61 POLI
Thou speakest to me of love. Knowest thou the land 1 274 65 POLI
Thou spokest to me of love. Knowest thou the land 1 274 65A POLI
POLITIAN. O, wilt thou — wilt thou 1 274 74 POLI
Fly to that Paradise — my Lalage, wilt thou 1 274 75 POLI
For thee, and in thine eyes — and thou shalt be 1 274 79 POLI
My all; — oh, wilt thou — wilt thou, Lalage, 1 275 85 POLI
Thou art not gone — thou art not gone, Politian! 1 275 91 POLI
I feel thou art not gone — yet dare not look, 1 275 92 POLI
Lest I behold thee not; thou couldst not go 1 275 93 POLI
To say thou art not gone, — one little sentence, 1 275 96 POLI
To say how thou dost scorn — how thou dost hate 1 275 97 POLI
My womanly weakness. Ha! ha! thou ALI not gone — 1 275 98 POLI
O speak to me! I knew thou wouldst not go! 1 275 99 POLI
I knew thou wouldst not, couldst not, durst not go. 1 275 100 POLI
Villain, thou art not gone — thou mockest me! 1 275 101 POLI
POLITIAN. What didst thou say? 1 279 13 POLI
All very true. Thou art my friend, Baldazzar, 1 280 31 POLI
A piece of service; wilt thou go back and say 1 280 33 POLI
thou reasonest well. 1 280 38 POLI
I know what thou wouldst say — send not the message — 1 280 39 POLI
POLITIAN. I am the Earl of Leicester, and thou seest, 1 280 46 POLI
Dost thou not? that I am here. 1 280 47 POLI
Hath without doubt arisen: thou hast been urged 1 280 49 POLI
POLITIAN. Thou wilt not fight with me 1 281 64 POLI
Exceeding well! — thou darest not fight with me? 1 281 65.18 POLI
Didst say thou darest not? Ha! 1 281 66 POLI
Thou darest not! 1 281 70.1B POLI
Against thee, Earl of Leicester. Strike thou home — 1 282 80 POLI
Think not to fly me thus. Do thou prepare 1 282 85 POLI
Even unto death. Before those whom thou lovest — 1 282 89 POLI
Dost hear? with cowardice — thou wilt not fight me? 1 282 91 POLI
Thou liest! thou shalt! 1 282 92 POLI
The bridegroom — where art thou? 1 287 59 POLI
Hast thou no tear? 1 335 10 LENA
And thou art wild 1 335 35 LENA
And, Guy De Vere, hast thou no tear? 1 336 3 LENK
thou,” I said, “art sure no craven, 1 366 45 RAVEN
All — all expired save thee — save less than thou: 1 446 36 TOHEL
And thou, a ghost, amid the entombing trees 1 446 50 TOHEL


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Notes:

Note: For this online presentation, the underlined text has been rendered as italic, in keeping with the original intention.


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[S:0 - CPEAP, 1989] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works-Concordance of the Poetry of EAP (E. Wiley) (Letter A-ALL)