Text: Elizabeth Wiley, “Concordance (TO through TO),” Concordance of the Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe, (1989), pp. 586-597 (This material is protected by copyright)


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TEXT   V     PAGE    LINE       POEM
 
TO ( 675 591)
Weary. I laid me on a couch to rest — 1 6 2 POET
To take things seriously or all in jest; 1 9 12 TEMP
To weep, as he did, till his eyes were sore, 1 9 14 TEMP
Democritus of Thrace, who used to toss over 1 10 16 TEMP
Each fit to furnish forth four hours debate. 1 10 22 TEMP
And in the meantime, to prevent all bother, 1 10 25 TEMP
I’m apt to be discursive in my style, 1 10 37 TEMP
Here he may revel to his heart’s content, 1 10 49 TEMP
Or who so cold, so callous to refuse 1 11 57 TEMP
God help me, it has been my lot to know, 1 11 60 TEMP
But speak to him, he’ll make you such grimace, 1 11 63 TEMP
Lord! to be grave exceeds the power of face. 1 11 64 TEMP
As to the seat of thought in man and brute, 1 11 74 TEMP
Because to his cat’s eyes I hold a glass 1 12 87 TEMP
I think he’ll take this likeness to himself, 1 12 89 TEMP
In vain I struggle to forget 1 17 3 OCT
And fondly turn to thee! 1 17 5 OCT
But Octavia, do not strive to rob 1 17 6 OCT
To shun the fate, with which to cope 1 26 4 TAMA
Is more than crime may dare to dream, 1 26 5 TAMA
Nor am I mad, to deem that power 1 27 8 TAMA
Rome to the Caesar — this to me; 1 27 34 TAMA
1.1,—1,4 ...m 1.n mu h.lf rin=inn my. 1 PR q1 TAMA
Its spirit cradled me to sleep, 1 29 71 TAMA
My soul in mystery to steep: 1 29 74 TAMA
Have deem’d, since I have reach’d to power 1 29 80 TAMA
I have no words, alas! to tell 1 29 88 TAMA
Nor would I dare attempt to trace 1 29 90 TAMA
Which ev’n to my impassion’d mind, 1 29 92 TAMA
And I have held to mem’ry’s eye 1 29 98 TAMA
’Tis not to thee that I should name — 1 30 102 TAMA
Thou can’st not — would’st not dare to think 1 30 103 TAMA
Trust to the fickle star within? 1 30 119 TAMA
There was no need to speak the rest — 1 31 133 TAMA
No need to quiet her kind fears — 1 31 134 TAMA
To mind — not flow’rs alone — but more 1 31 142 TAMA
And bade it first to dream of crime, 1 31 149 TAMA
My phrenzy to her bosom taught: 1 31 150 TAMA
It is not surely sin to name, 1 31 157 TAMA
And happy beauty (for to me 1 32 161 TAMA
(I speak thus openly to thee, 1 32 182 TAMA
’Twere folly now to veil a thought 1 32 183 TAMA
To know the fate it will inherit) 1 32 192 TAMA
I spoke to her of power and pride — 1 33 224 TAMA
The flush on her bright cheek, to me, 1 34 230 TAMA
Seem’d to become a queenly throne 1 34 231 TAMA
To leave her while we both were young, — 1 34 236 TAMA
To follow my high fate among 1 34 237 TAMA
Now sounded to her heedless ear — 1 34 240 TAMA
To gain an empire, and throw down 1 34 243 TAMA
With their own breath to fan its fire) 1 34 255 TAMA
That they shall stoop in life to one 1 35 261 TAMA
Whom daily they are wont to see 1 35 262 TAMA
I pictur’d to my fancy’s eye 1 35 266 TAMA
To its most desperate intent,) 1 35 270 TAMA
To trust the weakness of my heart 1 36 291 TAMA
To her soft thrilling voice: To part 1 36 292 TAMA
Too real, to his breast who lives 1 36 307 TAMA
To God, and to the great whole — 1 36 310 TAMA
To him, whose loving spirit will dwell 1 36 311 TAMA
A more than agony to him 1 36 315 TAMA
Is grace to its heav’nly bed of blue; 1 37 321 TAMA
For the flight on Earth to Fancy giv’n, 1 37 325 TAMA
(It boots me not, good friar, to tell 1 38 349 TAMA
I clamber’d to the tottering height,) 1 38 352 TAMA
In dusky grandeur to my eyes: 1 38 363 TAMA
To him, who still would gaze upon 1 38 366 TAMA
To the sound of the coming darkness (known 1 38 372 TAMA
To those whose spirits hark’n) as one 1 38 373 TAMA
For all we live to know — is known; 1 39 386 TAMA
And all we seek to keep — hath flown; 1 39 387 TAMA
Its spirit cradled me to sleep, 1 40 71 TAMB
My soul in mystery to steep: 1 40 74 TAMB
Have deem’d since I have reach’d to power 1 40 80 TAMB
I have no words, alas! to tell 1 40 88 TAMB
Nor would I now attempt to trace 1 40 90 TAMB
Which, ev’n to this impassion’d mind, 1 41 92 TAMB
So have I held to Memory’s eye 1 41 98 TAMB
And bade it first to dream of crime. 1 41 149 TAMB
It is not surely sin to name 1 41 157 TAMB
And happy beauty — (for to me 1 41 161 TAMB
To know the fate it will inherit) 1 42 192 TAMB
I spoke to her of power & pride, 1 43 224 TAMB
The flush on her bright cheek to me 1 43 230 TAMB
Seem’d to become a queenly throne 1 43 231 TAMB
To leave her while we both were young: 1 43 236 TAMB
To follow my high fate among 1 43 237 TAMB
Now sounded to her heedless ear — 1 43 240 TAMB
To gain an empire & throw down 1 44 243 TAMB
A spirit ne’er to be at rest. 1 44 246 TAMB
And’crouches to a keeper’s hand — 1 44 253 TAMB
With their own breath to fan his fire. 1 44 256 TAMB
The sound of revelry to night 1 44 339 TAMB
I have no time to dote or dream: 1 45 6 TAMF
Rome to the Caesar — this to me? 1 46 35 TAMF
Appear’d to my half-closing eye 1 46 50 TAMF
Have deem’d, since I have reach’d to power, 1 47 71 TAMF
To haunt of the wide world a spot 1 47 80 TAMF
To the terror of that lone lake. 1 48 90 TAMF
Could ever bribe me to define, 1 48 94 TAMF
Solace to my imagining? 1 48 97 TAMF
And 0! I have no words to tell 1 48 102 TAMF
I will not now attempt to trace 1 48 104 TAMF
To fantasies with — none. 1 48 112 TAMF
Trust to the fire within for light? 1 49 122 TAMF
There was no need to speak the rest, 1 49 135 TAMF
No need to quiet any fears 1 49 136 TAMF
I spoke to her of power and pride, 1 50 157 TAMF
The flush upon her cheek to me, 1 50 163 TAMF
And crouches to a keeper’s hand, 1 50 173 TAMF
With their own breath to fan its fire. 1 51 176 TAMF
To the young Tamerlane — to me! 1 51 182 TAMF
And failing of thy power to bless, 1 51 187 TAMF
To him who still would look upon 1 51 199 TAMF
To the sound ’of the coming darkness (known 1 52 203 TAMF
To those whose spirits harken) as one 1 52 204 TAMF
Where there is nothing to deceive, 1 52 220 TAMF
How bright! and yet to creep 1 53 247 TAMF
Thro’ my fingers to the deep! 1 53 248 TAMF
I have no time to dote or dream: 1 54 6 TAMH
Rome to the Caesar — this to me? 1 54 31 TAMH
Appeared to my half-closing eye 1 55 46 TAMH
Seem’d then to my half-closing eye 1 55 46E TAMH
Have deem’d, since I have reach’d to power, 1 56 67 TAMH
I have no words — alas! — to tell 1 56 75 TAMH
Nor would I now attempt to trace 1 56 77 TAMH
To fantasies — with none. 1 56 85 TAMH
Trust to the fire within, for light? 1 56 95 TAMH
There was no need to speak the rest — 1 57 108 TAMH
No need to quiet any fears 1 57 109 TAMH
I spoke to her of power and pride, 1 58 145 TAMH
The flush on her bright cheek, to me 1 58 151 TAMH
Seem’d to become a queenly throne 1 58 152 TAMH
And crouches to a keeper’s hand — 1 58 161 TAMH
With their own breath to fan his fire. 1 58 164 TAMH
And, failing in thy power to bless, 1 59 181 TAMH
To him who still would look upon 1 59 193 TAMH
To the sound of the coming darkness (known 1 59 197 TAMH
To those whose spirits harken) as one 1 60 198 TAMH
For all we live to know is known 1 60 209 TAMH
And all we seek to keep hath flown — 1 60 210 TAMH
O, I defy thee, Hell, to show 1 60 219 TAMH
Where there is nothing to deceive, 1 60 225 TAMH
Of waking life to him whose heart shall be, 1 68 6 DREA
Of waking life to him whose heart must be, 1 68 6A DREA
Continuing — as dreams have been to me 1 68 10 DREA
’Twere folly still to hope for higher Heaven! 1 68 12 DREA
To the delirious eye more lovely things 1 69 32 DREA
The cause — but none are near to pry 1 71 3 SPIRA
With light like Hope to mortals giv’n, 1 71 14 SPIRA
To thy withering heart shall seem 1 71 16 SPIRA
Which would cling to thee forever. 1 71 18 SPIRA
Not one, of all the crowd, to pry 1 72 3 SPIRD
With light like Hope to mortals given — 1 72 14 SPIRD
To thy weariness shall seem 1 72 16 SPIRD
Which would cling to thee for ever. 1 72 18 SPIRD
Now are visions ne’er to vanish — 1 72 20 SPIRD
And I turn’d away to thee, 1 74 14 STAR
For joy to my heart 1 74 18 STAR
To a ferver by the moon beam that hangs o’er, 1 77 10 STAN
To the loved object — so the tear to the lid 1 77 18 STAN
In beauty by our God, to those alone 1 78 26 STAN
To him whose eyes are cast 1 79 6 ADRE
An essence — powerful to destroy 1 82 23 HAPP
To haunt of the wide earth a spot 1 84 2 LAKEA
To haunt of the wide world a spot 1 85 2 LAKEF
To haunt of the wide earth a spot 1 85 2B LAKEF
To the terror of the lone lake. 1 85 12 LAKEA
To the terror of the lone lake. 1 85 12 LAKEF
To the terror of that lone lake. 1 85 12E LAKEF
To his dark imagining; 1 85 20 LAKEA
Could teach or bribe me to define — 1 86 16 LAKEF
Should ever bribe me to define — 1 86 16C LAKEF
To his lone imagining — 1 86 21 LAKEF
To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies, 1 91 7 SCI
To seek for treasure in the jewell’d skies, 1 91 7A-E SCI
To seek a shelter in some happier star? 1 91 11 SCI
To seek for shelter in some happier star? 1 91 11BC SCI
Can struggle to its destin’d eminence — 1 100 23 ALAAR
To distant spheres, from time to time, she rode, 1 100 24 ALAAR
And late to ours, the favour’d one of God — 1 100 25 ALAAR
So eagerly around about to hang 1 101 45 ALAAR
So like its own above that, to this hour, 1 101 57 ALAAR
Heaving her white breast to the balmy air, 1 101 64 ALAAR
She fears to perfume, perfuming the night: 1 102 67 ALAAR
Bursting its odorous heart in spirit to wing 1 102 72 ALAAR
Its way to Heaven, from garden of a king: 1 102 73 ALAAR
Fair flowers, and fairy! to whose care is given 1 102 80 ALAAR
To bear the Goddess’ song, in odors, up to Heaven: 1 102 81 ALAAR
To be drudges till the last — 1 103 93 ALAAR
To be carriers of fire 1 103 94 ALAAR
And here, in thought, to thee — 1 104 110 ALAAR
Abash’d, amid the lilies there, to seek 1 104 119 ALAAR
Link’d to a little system, and one sun — 1 104 134 ALAAR
With many a mutter’d “hope to be forgiven” 1 105 5 ALAAR
To bear my secrets thro’ the upper Heaven. 1 105 142 ALAAR
And wing to other worlds another light! 1 105 146 ALAAR
To the proud orbs that twinkle — and so be 1 105 148 ALAAR
To ev’ry heart a barrier and a ban 1 105 149 ALAAR
Our faith to one love — and one moon adore — 1 105 153 ALAAR
Is now upon thee — but too late to save! 1 107 39 ALAAR
Sound loves to revel in a summer night: 1 107 40 ALAAR
Sound loves to revel near a summer night: 1 107 40CE ALAAR
Within the centre of that hall to breathe 1 108 56 ALAAR
Within the centre of this hall to breathe 1 108 56F ALAAR
And long’d to rest, yet could but sparkle there! 1 108 59 ALAAR
To happy flowers that night — and tree to tree; 1 108 61 ALAAR
Bore burthen to the charm the maiden sang: 1 108 67 ALAAR
Come down to your brow 1 108 77 ALAAR
And come down to your brow 1 108 77F ALAAR
To duty beseeming 1 109 82 ALAAR
That lull’d ye to rest! 1 109 91 ALAAR
Will to melody run, 1 109 103 ALAAR
On the breezes to toss? 1 109 105 ALAAR
To keep watch with delight 1 109 110 ALAAR
Which leaps down to the flower, 1 110 121 ALAAR
That leaps down to the flower, 1 110 121F ALAAR
To springs that lie clearest 1 110 130 ALAAR
To lone lake that smiles, 1 110 132 ALAAR
They slumber’d to hear — 1 111 147 ALAAR
Which lull’d him to rest?” 1 111 155 ALAAR
Spirits in wing, and angels to the view, 1 111 156 ALAAR
To them ’twere the Simoom, and would destroy — 1 111 165 ALAAR
For what (to them) availeth it to know 1 111 166 ALAAR
Sweet was their death — with them to die was rife 1 111 168 ALAAR
But sleep that pondereth and is not “to be” — 1 111 171 ALAAR
To those who hear not for their beating hearts. 1 112 177 ALAAR
To his love-haunted heart and melancholy. 1 112 189 ALAAR
The night had found (to him a night of wo) 1 112 190 ALAAR
It trembled to the orb of EARTH again. 1 112 197 ALAAR
It trembled to one constant star again. 1 112 197ACE ALAAR
How lovely ’tis to look so far away! 1 113 199 ALAAR
I left her gorgeous halls — nor mourn’d to leave. 1 113 201 ALAAR
I left her gorgeous halls — nor mourun’d to leave. 1 113 201E ALAAR
And half I wish’d to be again of men.” 1 113 226 ALAAR
And half I wished to be again of men.” 1 113 226E ALAAR
“My Angelo! and why of them to be? 1 114 227 ALAAR
Methought, my sweet one, then I ceased to soar 1 114 237 ALAAR
Methought, Ianthe, then I ceas’d to soar 1 114 237A ALAAR
Methought, my sweet one, then I ceas’d to soar 1 114 237CE ALAAR
For nearest of all stars was thine to ours — 1 114 242 ALAAR
“We came — and to thy Earth — but not to us 1 114 245 ALAAR
“We came — my Angelo — but not to us 1 114 245A ALAAR
Be given our lady’s bidding to discuss: 1 114 246 ALAAR
She grants to us, as granted by her God — 1 114 250 ALAAR
She gives to us as given by her God — 1 114 250A ALAAR
When first Al Aaraaf knew her course to be 1 115 255 ALAAR
When first Tophet-Nour knew her course to be 1 115 255J2 ALAAR
When first the phantom’s course was found to be 1 115 255LMQ ALAAR
They fell: for Heaven to them no hope imparts 1 115 263 ALAAR
Romance, who loves to nod and sing 1 128 1 ROMG
Romance, who loves to nod and sing, 1 128 1C ROMG
To me a painted paroquet 1 128 5 ROMG
Taught me my alphabet to say — 1 128 7 ROMG
To lisp my very earliest word 1 128 8 ROMG
To while away — forbidden things! 1 128 19 ROMG
To while away — forbidden thing! 1 128 19C ROMG
My heart would feel to be a crime 1 128 20 ROMG
My heart hath fear’s to be a crime 1 128 20C ROMG
To my destiny in a star: 1 130 6A SHOULD
How bright! and yet to creep 1 131 21D SHOULD
Thro’ my fingers to the deep! 1 131 22 SHOULD
I laugh to think how poor 1 131 37 SHOULD
That pleasure “to endure!” 1 131 38 SHOULD
And sleep to dream till day 1 133 10 BOWERS
They have found to be the best) 1 140 14 FAIRY1
My heart to joy at the same tone — 1 146 7 ALONE
To adopt the cause for better or worse 1 147 2 LEA
To cure his love — was cured of all beside — 1 150 8 ACROS
He never was known to lie — 1 151 3 LOCKE
The former was well known to fame, 1 151 7 LOCKE
But the latter’s well known “to report.” 1 151 8 LOCKE
The latter’s well known “to report.” 1 151 8B LOCKE
The latter well known “to report.” 1 151 8C LOCKE
Romance, who loves to nod and sing, 1 156 1 INTRO
To me a painted paroquet 1 156 5 INTRO
Taught me my alphabet to say — 1 156 7 INTRO
To lisp my very earliest word 1 156 8 INTRO
His pleasures always turn’d to pain — 1 157 24 INTRO
His naivete to wild desire — 1 157 25 INTRO
His wit to love — his wine to fire — 1 157 26 INTRO
And used to throw my earthly rest 1 157 29 INTRO
To while away — forbidden thing! 1 157 43 INTRO
My heart half fear’d to be a crime 1 157 44 INTRO
To dream my very life away. 1 158 55 INTRO
To break upon Time’s monotone, 1 158 60 INTRO
To-day (the wind blew, and) it swung 1 161 14 FAIRY2
Helen, thy beauty is to me 1 165 1 HELF
To his own native shore. 1 166 5 HELF
On desperate seas long wont to roam, 1 166 6 HELF
To the glory that was Greece, 1 166 9 HELF
To the beauty of fair Greece, 1 166 9AB HELF
To the grandeur that was Rome. 1 166 10C HELF
While, to listen, the red levin 1 174 10 ISRA
Is owing to that lyre 1 174 15 ISRA
To thee the laurels belong 1 174 27 ISRA
While, to listen, the red levin 1 175 12 ISRG
Is owing to that lyre 1 176 19 ISRG
To thee the laurels belong, 1 176 32 ISRG
When winged visions love to lie 1 183 3 IRENE1
Or worse — upon her brow to dance 1 183 5 IRENE1
A ne’er-to-be untangled mass. 1 183 8 IRENE1
A conscious slumber seems to take, 1 183 14 IRENE1
And million bright pines to and fro, 1 183 18 IRENE1
And million cedars to and fro, 1 183 18BC IRENE1
To the lone oak that reels with bliss, 1 183 20 IRENE1
To the lone oak that nodding hangs, 1 183 20BC IRENE1
With casement open to the skies, 1 184 23 IRENE1
Her casement open to the skies! 1 184 24C IRENE1
“A wonder to our desert trees! 1 184 30 IRENE1
“To open thy window to the night, 1 184 32 IRENE1
Entranc’d, the spirit loves to lie 1 184 43 IRENE1
Entranced, the spirit loves to lie 1 184 43C IRENE1
Its way to some remember’d lake, 1 184 48 IRENE1
Its way to Heav’n — and sorrow forsake, 1 184 48C IRENE1
To bathe in the pure element, 1 184 50 IRENE1
To the night-winds as they pass, 1 184 54 IRENE1
I pray to God that she may lie 1 185 63 IRENE1
A conscious slumber seems to take, 1 187 14 IRENE2
With casement open to the skies 1 187 16.1DE IRENE2
(Her casement open to the skies) 1 187 16.2FGH IRENE2
This window open to the night? 1 187 19 IRENE2
This lattice open to the night? 1 187 19DEF IRENE2
A wonder to these garden trees! 1 187 33 IRENE2
A wonder to our garden trees! 1 187 33E IRENE2
I pray to God that she may lie 1 188 42 IRENE2
Thrilling to think, poor child of sin! 1 188 59 IRENE2
Nor thrill to think, poor child of sin! 1 188 59DE IRENE2
Trusting to the mild-eyed stars, 1 195 4 NISE
To keep watch .above the flowers, 1 195 6 NISE
Have gone to their eternal rest. 1 199 5 CITYA
To heaven with that ungodly gloom! 1 199 9 CITYA
We liken our ladies’ eyes to them — 1 199 16 CITYA
It would be mockery to call 1 199 18 CITYA
And Death to some more happy clime 1 200 57 CITYA
Have gone to their eternal rest. 1 201 5 CITYH
And weep! — oh! to dishonor 1 206 7 PAEAN
Tun’d to such solemn song 1 206 18 PAEAN
Through the grey chambers to my song, 1 206 28.3A PAEAN
To join the all-hallowed mirth 1 207 35 PAEAN
To join the untainted mirth 1 207 35A PAEAN
Therefore, to thee this night 1 207 37 PAEAN
To show you all what fools you are. 1 211 2 EPIG
Thou wast that all to me, love, 1 214 1 PARA
Thou wast all to me, love, 1 214 1A PARA
Thou wast all that to me, love, 1 214 1KMP PARA
Ah, dream too bright to last! 1 214 7 PARA
But to be overcast! 1 214 9 PARA
Only to be overcast! 1 214 9A PARA
To the sands upon the shore) 1 214 18 PARA
To sands on the sea-shore, 1 214 18A PARA
From me — to titled age and crime, 1 215 20.3B PARA
From Love — to titled age and crime, 1 215 20.3CEGLQ PARA
Thy grace did guide to thine and thee; 1 217 8 HYMN
Thy love did guide to thine and thee; 1 217 8A-D HYMN
Long life to our King, 1 219 7 LATIN
To mar the silence ev’n with lute. 1 222 4 SERE
To wake to sunshine and to show’r, 1 224 3 SLEEP
To smile and weep. 1 224 4 SLEEP
To mar the bright, the perfect flow’r, 1 224 13 SLEEP
Must wake to weep. 1 224 20 SLEEP
Of lofty contemplation left to Time 1 228 2 COLIS
Waved to the wind, now wave the reed and thistle! 1 228 21 COLIS
Wav’d to the wind, now wave the reed and thistle! 1 228 21AC COLIS
By the corrosive Hours to Fate and me? 1 229 32 COLIS
“As melody from Memnon to the Sun. 1 229 36 COLIS
“As in old days from Memnon to the Sun. 1 229 36ACD COLIS
“As from the granite Memnon to the Sun. 1 229 368 COLIS
And thus thy memory is to me 1 237 8 TOF
Seraph thy memory is to me 1 237 8BC TOF
BENITO. Faith that’s a question, Ugo, hard to answer, 1 248 2 POLI
On a wine-table some candles burnt/ to the socket. 1 248 2/ 3d POLI
(UGO sits, and helps himself to wine. Enter RUPERT.) 1 248 23d POLI
(to BENITO.) 1 249 11d POLI
I had not look’d to see — he is sadly altered! 1 249 26 POLI
And goads him to these courses. They say the Duke 1 249 44 POLI
As humbles her to the dust. 1 249 47 POLI
To the frightful sounds of merriment below 1 249 49.1Ax POLI
(to BENITO.) 1 250 24d POLI
Ere this mischance I cannot bear to think 1 250 60 POLI
RUPERT. Let us to bed! the man is steeped in liquor. 1 250 70 POLI
Come let us to bed 1 250 70 POLI
UGO. What did they say? to bed! 1 250 71 POLI
I will to bed anon ah! bless my eyes! 1 250 73 POLI
You do not mean to say the count my master 1 251 84 POLI
UGO. I’m going to cut — 1 251 92 POLI
UGO. To cut you altogether! 1 251 93 POLI
Who gave them to me, d’ye hear? who gave them to me 1 252 113 POLI
Last year — she gave it to me — d’ye see? 1 252 120 POLI
To get drunk — a very serious business — excellent! 1 253 9 POLI
(I’ll send them to you) — a bundle of paternosters 1 253 12 POLI
You spoke to the Lady Lalage? 1 253 26 POLI
(trying. to suppress a smile.) 1 254 36d POLI
Had I the will, to bring such foul disgrace 1 255 72 POLI
No right at all to do it. Am I not bound too 1 255 75 POLI
To my cousin Alessandra? Honor’s the thing! 1 255 77 POLI
A glass of wine will put you all to rights. 1 255 84 POLI
To his reverence — did you not say his reverence? 1 256 93 POLI
You’re not to have the wine, only your choice. 1 256 99 POLI
Down in the hall, Sir, — you’re to have your choice 1 256 101 POLI
If I should die for it — to have my choice 1 257 113 POLI
If I should die for it — and I to have my choice 1 257 113Ax POLI
The wine or the ashes! Ugo, send word to the Count 1 257 114 POLI
Ha! ha! ha! ha! — Ugo send word to the Count 1 257 115 POLI
Only to think of that! a tub of ashes! 1 257 121 POLI
Too much of late, and I am vexed to see it. 1 258 12 POLI
To thy dress and equipage — they are over plain 1 258 24 POLI
To thy habiliments — they are over plain 1 258 24A2x POLI
CASTIGLIONE. I’ll see to it. 1 258 26 POLI
CASTIGLIONE. I will see to it. 1 258 26Ax POLI
ALESSANDRA. Then see to it! — pay more attention, sir, 1 258 27 POLI
To a becoming carriage — much thou wantest 1 258 28 POLI
I speak to him — he speaks of Lalage! 1 258 32 POLI
To the imperial city. 1 259 44 POLI
And little given to thinking. 1 259 53 POLI
Drinking the cup of pleasure to the dregs. 1 259 60 POLI
“But Ocean ever to refresh mankind 1 260 8 POLI
To what my fevered soul doth dream of Heaven! 1 260 11 POLI
LALAGE continues to/ read.) 1 260 16/17d POLI
“Seemed to have years too many” — Ah luckless lady! 1 261 19 POLI
To grieve thee or to vex thee? — I am sorry. 1 261 37 POLI
How fares good Ugo? — and when is it to be? 1 262 43 POLI
Would have given a real diamond to such as you; 1 262 53 POLI
LALAGE. Poor Lalage! — and is it come to this? 1 262 56 POLI
Whom thou hast cherished to sting thee to the soul! 1 262 58 POLI
Thou hast no end to gain — no heart to break — 1 263 71 POLI
Give up thy soul to penitence, and pray! 1 263 75 POLI
A crucifix whereon to register 1 264 98 POLI
Of the Earl — whom all the world allows to be 1 265 22 POLI
To say the truth about an hour ago 1 265 27 POLI
Demeanour of his friend — who to speak the truth 1 266 38 POLI
To Rome — his Grace the Duke of Broglio. 1 266 48 POLI
To Rome and to our palace Earl Politian! 1 266 53 POLI
And you most noble Duke! am glad to see you! 1 266 54 POLI
Will hand them to your Grace. I would retire. 1 267 64 POLI
His lordship’s chambers — show his lordship to them! 1 267 66 POLI
This way, my son, I wish to speak with thee. 1 267 75 POLI
To see thee thus. 1 268 7 POLI
To give thee cause for grief, my honoured friend. 1 268 8 POLI
BALDAZZAR. To the field then — to the field — 1 268 14 POLI
To the senate or the field. 1 268 15 POLI
BALDAZZAR. Give not thy soul to dreams: 1 268 21 POLI
In hearkening to imaginary sounds 1 268 24 POLI
To me, Politian, of thy camps and courts. 1 268 28 POLI
The sands of Time are changed to golden grains, 1 269 41 POLI
Is balmier now than it was wont to be — 1 269 46 POLI
As for to leave me thus 1 270 71 POLI
As for to leave me thus? 1 270 75 POLI
As for to leave me thus 1 270 80 POLI
As for to leave me thus? 1 270 84 POLI
These fancies to the winds. Remember, pray 1 270 84Ax POLI
These fancies to the wind. Remember, pray, 1 271 96 POLI
To look upon the face hidden by yon lattice — 1 271 102 POLI
“To gaze upon that veiled face, and hear 1 271 103 POLI
Shall be attended to. Good night, Politian. 1 271 114 POLI
To me, Politian? — dost thou speak of love 1 272 2 POLI
To Lalage? — ah wo — ah wo is me! 1 272 3 POLI
And beautiful Lalage! — and listen to me! 1 272 9AB POLI
POLITIAN. Speak not to me of glory! 1 273 30 POLI
Than in thy cause to scoff at this same glory 1 273 40 POLI
Far less a shadow which thou likenest to it, 1 274 61 POLI
Thou speakest to me of love. Knowest thou the land 1 274 65 POLI
Thou spokest to me of love. Knowest thou the land 1 274 65A POLI
Of Heaven untrammelled flow — which air to breathe 1 274 72 POLI
In days that are to come? 1 274 74 POLI
Fly to that Paradise — my Lalage, wilt thou 1 274 75 POLI
Attend thee ever; and I will kneel to thee 1 274 82 POLI
RUPERT. What ho! Benito! did you say to-night? 1 275 1 POLI
Is it to night — the wedding? 1 275 2 POLI
BENITO. To night I believe. 1 275 2 POLI
LALAGE. A deed is to be done — 1 275 86 POLI
With those words upon thy lips — O, speak to me! 1 275 94 POLI
To say thou art not gone, — one little sentence, 1 275 96 POLI
To say how thou dost scorn — how thou dost hate 1 275 97 POLI
O speak to me! I knew thou wouldst not go! 1 275 99 POLI
There’s time enough to spare — now let me see! 1 276 5 POLI
The wedding is to be at dark, and here 1 276 6 POLI
To a minute how many hours there are between 1 276 8 POLI
I will not walk myself to death at all — 1 276 13 POLI
The impudent varlet not to answer me! 1 276 16 POLI
The wretch not even to deign to condescend 1 276 17 POLI
To see me, as I sit upon the bank 1 276 18 POLI
tad kicks the bandbox to and/ fro 1 276 18/19d POLI
To stay with her now. She’d nothing of the lady 1 277 29 POLI
To one with such an air of condescension. 1 277 33 POLI
To see you, Madam Jacinta.” Well I don’t know 1 277 43 POLI
But when I get to be a lady — when 1 278 68 POLI
I’ll play my lady to a T, that will I. 1 278 71 POLI
To die ere I have lived! — Stay — stay thy hand, 1 279 3 POLI
I’ the budding of my hopes — give me to live,4- 1 279 7A POLI
In the budding of my hopes — give me to live, 1 279 7B POLI
Give me to live yet — yet a little while: 1 279 8 POLI
Demanded but to die! — what sayeth the Count? 1 279 10 POLI
BALDAZZAR. I go — to-morrow we meet, 1 280 43 POLI
Thereby. in heat of anger, to address 1 280 50 POLI
and recoiling to the ex-/tremitv 2f to p vtage.) 1 281 14/15d POLI
To me, Castiglione; the bearer being 1 281 52 POLI
POLITIAN Thus to the expiatory tomb, 1 281 59 POLI
Here is no let or hindrance to thy weapon — 1 282 81 POLI
To take thee at thy word? But mark me, sir! 1 282 84 POLI
Think not to fly me thus. Do thou prepare 1 282 85 POLI
To lie all day in that especial manner 1 283 53 POLI
I wish to see the Count — he’ll not admit me — 1 283 64 POLI
Dead, so to say, but having just committed 1 283 75 POLI
Deceased is not the proper word to express 1 284 80 POLI
Not being dead, nor yet to say deceased, 1 284 87 POLI
Contrive to stir a little? let me help you? 1 285 112 POLI
My nose is delicate, and to be plain 1 285 117 POLI
Sir, you may drop to pieces! 1 285 121 POLI
To see you on your legs, — a little stiff 1 285 124 POLI
Of lofty contemplation left to Time 1 286 3 POLI
Waved to the wind, now wave the reed and thistle: 1 286 26 POLI
By the corrosive hours to Fate and me? 1 287 39 POLI
As from the granite Memnon to the sun. 1 287 43 POLI
And he spoke to re-assure me, 1 307 13 BRIDA
And to the church-yard bore me, 1 307 16 BRIDA
And I sighed to him before me, 1 307 17 BRIDA
But he spoke to re-assure me, 1 309 13 BRIDF
And to the church-yard bore me, 1 309 16 BRIDF
And I sighed to him before me, 1 309 17 BRIDF
To a lute’s well-tuned law, 1 316 20 HAUNT
To a lute’s well-tuned law, 1 316 20AGJKM HAUNT
Was but to sing, 1 316 30 HAUNT
To a discordant melody, 1 317 44 HAUNT
Bring thee to meet his shadow (nameless elf, 1 322 13 SILE
No foot of man,) commend thyself to God! 1 322 15 SILE
Sit in a theatre, to see 1 325 5 WORM
That shift the scenery to and fro, 1 325 14 WORM
To the self-same spot, 1 326 22 WORM
Go up to God so mournfully that she may feel no wrong! 1 335 31 LENA
“Avaunt! — to-night 1 336 44 LENA
To friends above, from fiends below, 1 336 55 LENA
To a gold throne 1 336 58 LENA
That did to death the innocence 1 337 12 LENK
Go up to God so solemnly the dead may feel no wrong! 1 337 14 LENK
“Avaunt! — avaunt! to friends from fiends 1 337 20 LENK
From moan and groan to a golden throne 1 337 22 LENK
From grief and moan to a golden throne 1 337 22H LENK
From grief and groan to a golden throne 1 337 22J LENK
To friends above from fiends below 1 337 24C-GL LENK
From grief and moan to a gold throne 1 337 26C LENK
From moan and groan to a golden throne 1 337 26DE LENK
From grief and groan to a golden throne 1 337 26FGL LENK
See the White Eagle soaring aloft to the sky, 1 341 1 CAMP
In agony, to the Earth — and Heaven. 1 344 38 ROUTE
In agony, to the worms — and Heaven. 1 344 38AB ROUTE
In agony, to the earth — and Heaven. 1 344 38D ROUTE
To the weak human eye unclosed; 1 345 46 ROUTE
To the weak human eye enclosed; 1 345 46B ROUTE
While ever to her dear Eulalie upturns her matron eye — 1 349 20 EULA
While ever to it dear Eulalie upturns her matron eye — 1 349 20AZ EULA
And ever to her dear Eulalie upturns her matron eye — 1 349 20BCD EULA
While ever to her young Eulalie upturns her violet eye. 1 349 21 EULA
While ever to it young Eulalie upturns her violet eye. 1 349 21AZ EULA
And ever to it young Eulalie upturns her violet eye. 1 349 21BCD EULA
vainly I had sought to borrow 1 365 9 RAVEN
vainly I had tried to borrow 1 365 9ABCEFHLP RAVEN
So that now, to still the beating 1 365 15 RAVEN
ever dared to dream before; 1 365 26 RAVEN
fowl to hear discourse so plainly, 1 366 49 RAVEN
I betook myself to linking 1 367 69 RAVEN
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now 1 367 74 RAVEN
From crag to crag down the precipitous Time, 1 377 2 LINES
To those pure orbs, your heart to learn, 1 380 2 KATE
I scarce know which to prize most high — 1 380 3 KATE
Be each to each the second best? 1 382 8 VANE
With Love to rule our hearts supreme 1 382 15 VANE
And Friendship to be second best. 1 382 16 VANE
To check the power that governs here. 1 384 8 KING
O! would she deign to rule my fate, 1 384 9 KING
Gliding serenely to its goal, 1 386 23 FSO
These should be thine, to guard and shield, 1 386 25 FSO
Compose a sound delighting all to hear — 1 389 18 VALA
And now I leave these riddles to their Seer. 1 389 21 VALA
Made in his image a mannikin merely to madden it? 1 393 11 MODC
Many a thought will come to memory. 1 393 16 MODC
CVIII. Lines to show that “a truly Greek hexameter” 1 393 23 MODC
Do tell! when may we hope to make men of sense 1 394 25 MODC
To release my heart. 1 399 4 LOU
To come down and see: 1 399 11 LOU
Of all to whom thine absence is the night — 1 400 2 MLS
Of all to whom thy absence is the night — 1 400 2A MLS
Lying down to die, have suddenly arisen 1 400 9 MLS
Laying them down to die, have suddenly risen 1 400 9A MLS
By him who, as he pens them, thrills to think 1 400 17 MLS
The faithful heart yields to repose. 1 404 11 PHYS
Two gentle sounds made only to be murmured 1 406 8 MARA
Would hope to utter. Ah, Marie Louise! 1 406 16 MARA
Italian tones made only to be murmured 1 407 8 MARB
Could hope to utter. And I! my spells are broken. 1 407 16 MARB
To where the prospect terminates — thee only. 1 407 32 MARA
To where the prospect terminates — thee only. 1 408 27 MARB
And star-dials pointed to morn — 1 416 31 ULA
As star-dials pointed to morn — 1 416 31C ULA
To point us the path to the skies — 1 417 45 ULA
To the Lethean peace of the skies — 1 417 46 ULA
To shine on us with her bright eyes — 1 417 48 ULA
With Hope and in Beauty to-night — 1 417 65 ULA
Ah, we safely may trust to its gleaming 1 417 67 ULA
We surely may trust to a gleaming 1 417 69 ULA
We safely may trust to a gleaming 1 417 69A-DFG ULA
Since it flickers up to Heaven through the night.” 1 418 71 ULA
And we passed to the end of the vista — 1 418 75 ULA
And we passed to the end of a vista — 1 418 75K ULA
To bar up our way and to ban it 1 418 98 ULA
All the Heavens, seem to twinkle 1 435 7 BELLSEG
To the tintinabulation that so musically wells 1 435 11 BELLSEG
To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells 1 435 11FGH BELLSEG
To the turtle-dove that listens while she gloats 1 436 23 BELLSEG
To the swinging and the ringing 1 436 31 BELLSEG
To the rhyming and the chiming of the bells! 1 436 35 BELLSEG
Too much horrified to speak, 1 436 41 BELLSEG
Much too horrified to speak, 1 436 41A-D BELLSEG
In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire — 1 436 44 BELLSEG
Now — now to sit, or never, 1 436 49 BELLSEG
To the Paean of the bells — 1 438 97 BELLSEG
To the throbbing of the bells — 1 438 101 BELLSEG
To the sobbing of the bells: — 1 438 103 BELLSEG
To the rolling of the bells — 1 438 107 BELLSEG
To the tolling of the bells — 1 438 109 BELLSEG
To the moaning and the groaning of the bells. 1 438 112 BELLSEG
Where no wind dared to stir, unless on tiptoe — 1 445 10 TOHEL
To breathe the incense of those slumbering roses? 1 445 24 TOHEL
I saw but them — they were the world to me. 1 446 39 TOHEL
What wild heart-histories seemed to lie enwritten 1 446 42 TOHEL
Their office is to illumine and enkindle — 1 446 57 TOHEL
My duty, to be saved by their bright light, 1 446 58 TOHEL
And are far up in Heaven — the stars I kneel to 1 446 62 TOHEL
Come to life and fade away; 1 450 6 ALE
You are not wrong, to deem 1 451 4C TAKE
Through my fingers to the deep, 1 452 17 TAKE
And, to sleep, you must slumber 1 457 51 ANNIE
To sleep on her breast — 1 458 76 ANNIE
Deeply to sleep 1 458 77 ANNIE
And she prayed to the angels 1 458 81 ANNIE
To keep me from harm — 1 458 82 ANNIE
To the queen of the angels 1 458 83 ANNIE
To shield me from harm. 1 458 84 ANNIE
That you shudder to look at me, 1 459 93 ANNIE
The angels, whispering to one another, 1 467 2 MOTHB
Are mother to the one I loved so dearly, 1 467 11 MOTHB
Are mother to the dead I loved so dearly, 1 467 11 MOTHC
Was dearer to my soul than its soul-life. 1 467 14 MOTHB
Was dearer to my soul than its soul-life. 1 467 14 MOTHC
Than to love and be loved by me. 1 477 6 LEEA
To shut her up in a sepulchre, 1 477 19 LEEA
Than to love and be loved by me. 1 478 6 LEEE
To shut her up, in a sepulchre 1 479 19 LEEE


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Notes:

Note: For this online presentation, the underlined text has been rendered as italic, in keeping with the original intention.


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[S:0 - CPEAP, 1989] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works-Concordance of the Poetry of EAP (E. Wiley) (Letter A-ALL)