Edgar Allan Poe — “The Journal of Julius Rodman”


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Commentary:

Characters:

  • (narrator) - Under development.

Setting:

Location - Under development.

Date - Under development.

Summary:

Under development.


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Reading and Reference Texts:

Reading copy:

  • “The Journal of Julius Rodman” — reading copy

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Historical Texts:

Manuscripts and Authorized Printings:

 

Reprints:

  • “The Journal of Julius Rodman” (brief excerpts) — November 3, 1877 — Mirror of Literature (London), vol. I, no. 1, pp. 9-10  (A clipping of this rare item is in the Ingram collection at U. of VA.)
  • “The Journal of Julius Rodman” — 1884 — Works (Ingram) (Ingram was the first to reprint the full text, dropping the illustration of the Indian and the text that drew attention to it. It was first included, in vol. IV on pages 3-90, in the 1884 edition, then called Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe.)

 

Scholarly and Noteworthy Reprints:

  • “The Journal of Julius Rodman” — 1894-1895 — The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, vol. 5: Tales, ed. G. E. Woodberry and E. C. Stedman, Chicago: Stone and Kimball (5:255-351, and 5:359-361) (This is the first American reprint of the story, using Ingram’s text.)
  • The Journal of Julius Rodman” — 1902 — The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe, vol. 4: Tales III, ed. J. A. Harrison, New York: T. Y. Crowell (4:9-101, and 4:277-278)
  • The Journal of Julius Rodman” — 1981 — The Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, vol 1.: The Imaginary Voyages, ed. B. R. Pollin, Boston: Twayne Publishers (1:507-653).
  • “The Journal of Julius Rodman” — 1984 — Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Tales, Patrick F. Quinn (New York: Library of America), pp. 1183-1255

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Comparative Texts:

Instream Comparative Texts:

  • None.

 

Plain Text Files for Juxta:

  • None.

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Associated Material and Special Versions:

Miscellaneous Texts and Related Items:

  • “Le Journal de Julius Rodman” — 1882 — Contes Grotesques par Edgar Poe, Paris: Paul Ollendorff, pp. 169-200 (French translation by Émile Hennequin of three long extracts, from chapters 3-5, with linking commentary and summaries by the translator. Hennequin follows Ingram in omitting the woodcut illustration of the Indian and the sentence which refers to it.)
  • “Le Journal de Julius Rodman” — (French translation of the complete text, as much as Poe published, by M. D. Calvocoressi)
    • “Le Journal de Julius Rodman” — April 16-May 1, 1913 — Le Mercure de France (Paris)
    • “Le Journal de Julius Rodman” — part I — April 16, 1913
    • “Le Journal de Julius Rodman” — part II — May 1, 1913
  • “Le Journal de Julius Rodman” — 1914 — Edgar Poe: Histories étranges et Merrveilleuses, Paris: Mercure de France (proceeded by an introduction by the translator)
  • “The Journal of Julius Rodman” — 2009 — Audio book (unabridged), read by Chris Aruffo (part of a 6-CD set)

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Bibliography:

  • Achilles, Jochen, “Edgar Allan Poe’s Dreamscapes and the Transcendentalist View of Nature,” Amerikastudien/American Studies, 1995, 40:553-573
  • Clarke, Lewis Gaylord, [review of “Poe’s Journal of Julius Rodman”], Knickerbocker (August 18, 1838), 12:167.
  • Crawford, Polly R., “Lewis-Clark’s Expedition as a Source of Poe’s ‘The Journal of Julius Rodman’,” University of Texas Studies in English (1932), 12:158-170.
  • Farrell, Grace, “Dream Texts: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym and the Journal of Julius Rodman,” in Companion to Poe Studies, ed. Eric W. Carlson, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996, pp. 209-235
  • Heartman, Charles F. and James R. Canny, A Bibliography of First Printings of the Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Hattiesburg, MS: The Book Farm, 1943.
  • Kime, Wayne R., “Poe’s Use of Irving’s Astoria in ‘The Journal of Julius Rodman’,” American Literature (May 1968), 40:215-222.
  • Kime, Wayne R., “Poe’s Use of MacKenzie’s Voyages in ‘The Journal of Julius Rodman’,” Western American Literature (Spring 1968), 3:61-67.
  • Levine, Stuart, “Poe’s ‘The Journal of Julius Rodman,’ Judaism, Plagiarism, and the Wild West,” Midwest Quarterly (Spring 1960), 1:245-259.
  • Ljungquist, Kent P., The Grand and the Fair: Poe’s Landscape Aesthetics and Pictorial Techniques, Potomac, MD: Scripta Humanistica, 1984. {“Rodman” is specifically discussed on pp. 10-14 and 44-46.)
  • Mainville, Stephen, “Language and the Void: Gothic Landscapes in the Frontiers of Edgar Allan Poe,” Genre (1981), 14:347-362.
  • Nelson, William, “Julius Rodman and His Journey: Notes on the Publication in Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine,” Magazine of American History (March 1891), 25:255-256
  • Pollin, Burton R., ed., The Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe; Vol I- The Imaginary Voyages (Including The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, The Unparalled Adventure of one Hans Pfaall and The Journal of Julius Rodman), Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1981.
  • Saxena, M. C., “Evident Rapture: Poe’s Journal of Julius Rodman as Western Narrative,” Indian Journal of American Studies (1977), 7:41-53.
  • Teunissen, John J. and Evelyn J. Hinz, “Poe’s Journal of Julius Rodman as Parody,” Nineteenth Century Fiction (1972), 27:317-338.
  • Turner, Arlin, “A Note on Poe’s ‘The Journal of Julius Rodman’,” University of Texas Studies in English (1930), 10:147-151.
  • Turner, Arlin, “Another Source of Poe’s ‘The Journal of Julius Rodman’,” American Literature (March 1936), 8:69-70.
  • Weissberg, Liliane, “Editing Adventures: Writing the Text of Julius Rodman,” Modern Fiction Studies (1987), 33:413-430.
  • Wyllie, John Cooke, “A List of the Texts of Poe’s Tales,” Humanistic Studies in Honor of John Calvin Metcalf, Charlottesville: University of Virginia, 1941, pp. 322-338.

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[S:0 - JAS] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - Tales - The Journal of Julius Rodman