Text: J. L. Dameron and L. C Stagg, “Index to the Letters, ” An Index of Poe’s Critical Vocabulary in Poe’s Collected Works, (1966), pp. 6-12 (This material is protected by copyright)


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LETTERS

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ARTICLE:  a. in the compiler, 1.60; looked over his a. two or three times, 1.60; an a. offered in this manner, 1.86; a. on Slavery, 1.90; the a. ... promised, 1.90; an a. for our “Southern Literary Messenger, ” 1.93; a. on the “study of the learned languages, ” 1.98; heading of your last a., 1.98; a. would stand by itself, 1.98; a. “National Ingratitude, ” 1.99; the objectionable a. 1.103; the prose a. desired, 1.105; crude or hastily written a., 1.105; to forward an a., 1.111; nature of the a., 1.111; embodying in your [Joseph Evans Snodgrass’] a., 1.115; insert the a. editorially 1.120; the gymnastic a., 1.120; a prose a., 1.125; the promised a., 1.149; care not what the a. be, 1.151; any prose a., 1.152; influence of your name [Judge R. T. Conrad] in an a., 1.154; an a. upon any question, 1.154; an a. each month, 1.158; publishing an a., 1.179; a. in the Magazine, 1.182; the a. in The “Lady’s Book, ” 1.183; autograph a. for November, 1.185; a. in hand, 1.186; an a. each month, 1.187; “plate a., ” 1.188; an autograph a., 1.190; a. accepted with pleasure, 1.194; an a. similar to the one sent, 1.194; a similar a., 1.200; a. will excite attention, 1.200; the a. ... one of general interest, 1.202; neither did write the a., 1.202; The a. ... the handiwork of some underling, 1.202; the autograph a., 1.207; an a. from that ass O’Sullivan, 1.211; a short a. each month, 1.217; ventured to send an a., 1.220; an a. called “Notes upon English Verse, ” 1.222; an a. from yourself [F. W. Thomas], 1.224; to give me [Poe] an a., 1.227; a brief a. ... from Mr. Hawthorne, 1.232; the a. in question, 1.245; the a. on “American Poetry, ” 1.246; the a. affords so strong internal evidence, 1.246; Lowell’s a., 1.252; a. on “American Poetry, ” 1.253; Dickens ... wrote the a., 1.253; warm terms of the a., 1.254; accept an a., 1.254; an a. which will ... occupy that space, 1.255; an a. headed “Mesmeric Revelation, ” 1.259; the a. ... woefully misprinted, 1.261; a particular a. in the “Messenger, ” 1.264; one a. each month, 1.265; the “Versification” a., 1.272; an a., by myself [Poe], 1.273; ventured to send ... the a., 1.273; a. ... purely a fiction, 1.273; a. on “The Broadway Journal, ” 1.282; a. to which you refer [Laughton Osborn], 1.293; the offensive a., 1.294; the enclosed a., 1.305; Lowell’s a., 2.314; had read the a., 2.315; an a. from “The New-York Mirror, ” 2.318; a. upon which I [Poe] ... depend for literary reputation, 2.324; the Reveille a., 2.324; The a. generally copied in England, 2.337; an editorial a., 2.344; did not write the a., 2.345; the a. on “The American Library, ” 2.357; What do you [Louis A. Godey] say to an a., 2.358; The a. is imaginative, 2.358; opening chapter of an a., 2.415; the accompanying brief a., 2.417; an a. to the American Review, 2.419; an a. by me [Poe], 2.419; shy about the a., 2.433; referring the a. to you [Evert A. Duyckinck], 2.433.

ARTICLES:  any a. I may offer, 1.57; a. of which I speak, 1.58; a. which find their way into other periodicals, 1.58; Such a., 1.58; a. immeasurably inferior, 1.89; the Editorial a., 1.90; a. from the first pens in the land, 1.93; a. from our most distinguished literati, 1.96; series of continued a., 1.98; nature of the ... a., 1.111 proofs of my [Poe’s] a., 1.112; compensation for a., 1.121; compilation of various a., 1.131; Plate a., 1.131; long a., 1.131; no a. but from the best pens, 1.152; two a. of my own [Poe’s]1.152; fond of such a. as these, 1.152; few a. from other sources, 1.163; few a. from other sources, 1.165; two a. from each contributor, 1.165; few a. from other sources, 1.169; one of my [Poe’s] a., 1.176; bundle of other a., 1.181; transferring a., 1.181; some of my own [Poe’s] a., 1.181; a. have had a great run, 1.192; the appropriation of ... a. by others, 1.203; more quiet a., 1.220; The a. of copartnership, 1.224; The a. to be supplied, 1.247; his [a journalist’s] various a., 1.270; a. in volume form, 1.271; a series of a., 2.314; all the a., 2.314; a. lately published in “Godey’s Book, ” 2.326; look over the a., 2.351; a., at the old price, 2.351; the two a. ... left with you [Robert T. Conrad], 2.352; in respect to the a., 2.352; three a. of mine [Poe’s], 2.411; declining to receive any more a., 2.438; two of my [Poe’s] a., 2.438; the a. I [Poe] sent, 2.447; the a. will be found, 2.447.


BEAUTIFUL:  the coat a b. one, 1.4; a b. ... poem, 1.32; b. translation, 1.96; equally b. original lines, 1.96; most b. enthusiasm, 1.116; the b. lines “By an Octogenarian, ” 1.147; it [a poem] was very b., 1.222; poem ... truly b., 1.234; Mrs. Smith’s b. Poems, 1.289; b. lines by Mrs. Locke, 2.338; b. lines, 2.346; lines are indeed b., 2.384; lines are indeed ... b., 2.384; pure b. angel, 2.401; generous, b. ... sister Annie, 2.403; virtuous ... b. sister Annie, 2.403; lines ... truly b. 2.408; so b. a friend, 2.417; Dr. Earle’s very b. poetry, 2.451; the place ... a b. one, 2.459.

BEAUTIFY:  rare souls ... b. this earth, 2.374.

BEAUTY:  worship of all b., 1.32; the same b. which I [Poe] adore, 1.32; b. of the natural blue sky, 1.32; softness & b., 2.350; full of life and b., 2.373; b. was cruelty, 2.384; most simple b., 2.396.

BURLESQUE:  a b. upon criticism, 1.53; the witty exaggerated into the b., 1.58; a b. upon criticism generally, 1.104; the b. philosophy, 1.284.


CRITICISM:  a burlesque upon c., 1.53; spirit of the c., 1.89; a burlesque upon c. generally, 1.104; [ ... a simi]*lar c., 1.130; c. ... essentially correct 1.130; a c. upon it [Mr. Carey’s book], 1.138; the shape of c., 1.148; absolutely independent c., 1.150; Literary c., 1.152; in c. I will be bold, 1.152; Literary c., 1.154; blunders, ... twattle, which disgrace the c., 1.202; the c. in question, 1.202; Benjamin’s c., 1.274; in the manner of c., 1.279; “funny” c., 1.279; strictly impartial course of c., 1.282; blundering c., 2.331; The c. on Shelley, 2.332; his [L. G. Clark’s] c., 2.332; salient points of Literature — e.g. ... c., 2.333; a literary c., 2.344; a school of c., 2.355; c. that you may judge for yourself, 2.355; The c. referred chiefly to Willis’ “Tortesa, ” 2.417.

CRITICISMS:  plead guilty to all the c., 1.89; c. intended as a burlesque, 1.104; [ ... the c. in the Mag ...]*, 1.116; the c. ... not worth ... notice 1.118; all the c. are mine [Poe’s], 1.120; 4$ per page for c., 1.176; my [Poe’s] c., 1.271; c. on poetical works, 1.294; elaborate c., 2.332; c. against all efforts at generalization, 2.363; c., generally, 2.394; procure all the c., 2.397; stupid & captious c., 2.408.


EPIC:  a tailor’s e., 1.77; (and such an e. too:), 1.77.

ESSAY:  letter ... received — with the e., 1.106; Touching your [Joseph Evans Snodgrass’] e., 1.137; the e. in the same position, 1.137; in regard to your [J. E. Snodgrass] e.. 1.153; to hand over your [J. E. Snodgrass’] e., 1.155; e. “Mesmeric Revelation,” 1.279; The e. you [George W. Eveleth] enclose, 2.449.

ESSAYISTS:  made use of before by e., 1.98.

ESSAYS:  projected e., 1.125; rest of my [Poe’s] ... e., 2.332.


FANCY:  a [fervid]* f., 1.116; to please your [Rufus W. Griswold’s] f., 1.160; stimulated my f., 1.269; f., enfeebled and perverted by illness, 2.388; the f. arose, 2.396.

FANTASY:  see PHANTASY.


GENIUS:  enough about this g., 1.153; a “g.” who takes much interest in these matters, 1.188; the merely factitious, g. of the country, 1.206; Mr Longfellow has g., 1.238; indicative of g. in its author, 1.243; Willis is no g., 1.246; a man of rare g., 1.261; men of g., 2.330; If he have any g., 2.355; instinct with g., 2.370; admiration of ... g., 2.388; poetic g., 2.398; Miss Talley’s “g., ” 2.415.

GROTESQUE:  heightened into the g., 1.57-58; the purest g., 1.77.


HUMOUR:  wit or h., 1.77; a serious h., 2.328.


IDEAL:  purely i. love. 2.385.

IMAGINATION:  afloat in my i., 1.32; widest possible scope to the i., 1.118; the highest i., 2.329; my [Poe’s] i. to stray with you [Sarah Whitman], 2.396; beloved ... of my [Poe’s] i., 2.400.

IMAGINATIVE:  The article is i., 2.358; warmly i., 2.372; that seemingly i. process called Intuition, 2.380.

IMITATION:  pure i. as a whole, 1.77; hinted about i., 1.112; “metrical i., ” 1.246; the subject of i., 1.283.

IMITATOR:  i. of Tennyson, 1.253.

IMITATORS:  servile i. of the English, 2.427.

INCIDENTS:  little i., 1.74.

INDEFINITE:  music ... a most i. conception, 1.78.


MORALS:  well read in m., 1.156.

MUSIC:  m. ... a most indefinite conception, 1.78; love of m. grew stronger, 1.78; m. ... the ... idea, of Poetry, 1.258; Some ... taken ... by the m. [of “The Raven”], 2.319.

MYSTICAL:  strange and m., 1.58.


NOVEL:  speak fully of the n., 1.148; a n. on the tapis, 1.166; two thick n. volumes, 1.178; 5 of the ordinary n. volumes, 1.271.


ORIGINAL:  an o. tale, 1.53; full of o. things, 1.77; fine and o. images, 1.86; equally beautiful o. lines, 1.96; thoughts which are o., 1.273; yourself [Edward H. N. Patterson], almost “o., ” 2.439.

ORIGINALITY:  o. more than any thing else, 1.53; o. is an essential, 1.58; not a more lofty species of o., 1.77; o. of individual thoughts, 1.77; o. in the body of the work, 1.152; chief aims ... Independence, Truth, o., 1.247; absolute o., 1.273; a very striking o., 2.372; by no means o., things, 2.427; “o.” as the “keystone of success, ” 2.439.


PASSION:  flown off in a p., 1.7; wrought ... into a p., 1.130; My life [Poe’s] has been ... p., 1.257; holy p., 2.386.

PASSIONATE:  p. history, 2.383; my [Poe’s] p. boyhood, 2.385; floods of p. tears, 2.389; the most p. of hearts, 2.389; p. agony, 2.392; p. throbbings of my [Poe’s] heart, 2.395.

PASSIONS:  the vilest p. of our nature, 1.101; man of [high p.]*, 1.130; one of my [Poe’s] customary p., 2.328.

PHANTASY:  tales ... termed p. Pieces, 1.271.

PICTURESQUE:  p. and vigorous “Views A-Foot, ” 2.371.

PLAGIARISM:  the charge of p. 1.283; the subject of ... p., 1.283; the accusation of p., 2.343.

PLAGIARISMS:  the grossest p. ever perpetrated, 1.258.

PLAGIARIST:  an arrant p., 1.238.

POETIC SENTIMENT:  true spirit of p., 1.86.

PUFF:  a bribe to p. his book, 1.211.

PUFFS:  run down with p., 1.114.


RATIOCINATION:  tales of r., 1.258; tales of r., 2.328; taste for r., 2.328.


SATIRE:  the s. of some of my Tales, 1.84; half banter, half s., 1.84.

SIMPLICITY:  s. ... the cant of the day, 1.58; s. in their hearts, 1.58; unaffected s., 1.63.

STYLE:  a s. equal to any of our American publications, 1.20; superior in s., 1.57; attention must be paid to s., 1.58; purity of s., 1.58; faultlessness of s., 1.112; exaggeration in s., 1.121; s. of its versification, 1.161; stitching ... in the French s., 1.162; stitching ... in the French s., l. 164; a finer s., 1.166; stitching ... in the French s., 1.167; stitching ... in the French s., 1.169; the old-fashioned Dryden s., 1.175; such s. as Hoffman’s last poems, 1.212; s. ... at times somewhat exuberant, 1.243; tolerable idea of my s., 1.279; plausible or verisimilar s., 2.433; such a s. ... could not fail of effect, 2.433; the first s. of art, 2.440.

SUBLIME:  rendered even s., 1.118.


TALE:  no t. at all, 1.33; an original t., 1.53; t. originated in a bet, 1.57; a t. ... alluded to, 1.58; part of the t. faulty, 1.65; my [Poe’s] best t., 1.65; (the prize t. ...), 1.74; another t. in place of it, 1.74; a t. concerning the Moon, 1.74; The t. [‘The MS Found in a Bottle’] ... written some years ago, 1.77; the last t. I [Poe] wrote ... Morella, 1.78; a short prose t., 1.103; merits of each t., 1.103; the worst t., 1.103; each t. is read, 1.103; t. adjudged to be the worst, 1.104; spoke highl[y]* of my [Poe’s] t., 1.116; a late t. of mine [Poe’s], 1.118; This t. ... perhaps the best, 1.119; look anxiously for the t., 1.146; a t. called “The House of Usher, ” 1.160; a t. monthly, 1.182; the t. ... a mere extravaganza, 1.183; a t. of mine [Poe’s], 1.199; this t, printed in Boston, 1.200; a t. of mine [Poe’s] 1.201; a somewhat extravagant t., 1.247; (my [Poe’s] most successful t.), 1.253; to accept the t., 1.254; a single t. as a specimen, 1.267; each t. ... equally good of its kind, 2.329; “Ligea” ... my [Poe’s] best t., 2.329; the t. in question, 1.319; first issue of the t., 2.336.

TALES:  publishing all the t., 1.53; no two of these t., 1.58; in relation to my [Poe’s] t., 1.65; judgment concerning these t., 1.77; satire of some of my [Poe’s] t., 1.84; a series of t., by myself [Poe], 1.103; t. which appeared in the Messr, 1.103; reputation of these t., 1.104; the nature of these t., 1.104; publish my [Poe’s] t. collectively, 1.115; my [Poe’s] forthcoming t., 1.116; in regard to my [Poe’s] t., 1.121; two vols of t., 1.123; a copy of my [Poe’s] t., 1.124; papers notice my [Poe’s] t., 1.125; Touching my [Poe’s] t., 1.138; new collection of my [Poe’s] prose t., 1.178; music and love t., 1.197; the t. enumerated in the footnote, 1.253; t. of ratiocination, 1.258; t. I [Poe] have on hand, 1.258; my [Poe’s] t ... Phantasy Pieces, 1.271; t. fairly before the public, 1.271; 1500 ... t. have been sold, 1.301; another volume of my [Poe’s] t., 2.309; notice of my [Poe’s] t., 2.313; review of his [Poe’s] t., 2.319; in approbation of t. & Poems, 2.319; t. of ratiocination, 2.328; last selection of my [Poe’s] t., 2.328; these t. one by one, 1.328; all my [Poe’s] t., 2.329; rest of my [Poe’s] t., 2.332; The collection of t., 2.332.

TASTE:  bad t., 1.58; in bad t., 1.58; verge of bad t., 1.58; the t. of the day, 1.162; the t. of the merely uneducated, 1.162; purity of t., 1.162; the t. of the day, 1.164; merely for the t., 1.164; purity of t., 1.164; the t. of the day, 1.166; not ... the t., 1.166; purity of t., 1.167; the t. of the day, 1.168; not ... the t. of the merely uneducated, 1.168; purity of t., 1.169; of whose t. I am well assured, 1.194; coincidence of opinion & of t., 1.221; the cause of a Pure t., 1.231; prove little to your [James R. Lowell’s] t., 1.247; not too refined t., 1.247; t. for ratiocination, 2.328; great credit for t., 2.350; so classic a t., 2.350.

TASTEFUL:  t. ... comfort of the interior, 2.396.

TASTELESS:  the t., the uneducated, 1.164; the t., 1.166.

TOTALITY:  perfect t., 2.363.

TRANSCENDENTAL:  t. editors, 1.284.

TRANSCENDENTALISM:  supposing it to be t., 1.284.

TRANSCENDENTALISTS:  supposing I [Poe] dislike the t., 1.259.

TRUTH:  the t. of its contents, 1.41; cannot say with t., 1.63; disguise the t., 1.70; speaking the t., 1.117; an idea of the t., 1.118; The simple t., 1.123; serving the great cause of t., 1.143; the t. of a scandal, 1.155; the t. of his allegations, 1.155; The t. of the allegation, 1.156; for the sake of t., 1.156; t. ... for the sake of novelty, 1.164; my own [Poe’s] sense of t., 1.171; what no man knows to be t. better than yourself [Hastings Weld], 1.179; but ... is t., 1.188; slight extension of the t., 1.224; much t., 1.246; chief aims ... Independence, t., Originality, 1.247; what I [Poe] know to be the t., 1.280; by means of simple t., 2.322; sense of your [Horace Greeley’s] t., 2.345; [ ... expense of t. ...]*, 2.347; approaches the t., 2.361; absolute t., 2.380; the t. or nothing, 2.393; convince you of the t., 2.418; not one word of t. in it, 2.433; this vital t., 2.439; essay ... embodies some t., 2.449.

TRUTH’S:  not so much for t. sake, 1.164.


UNITY:  book-u. always in mind, 2.328; tendency of all things to return into their original u., 2.361; u. is Nothingness u., 2.361; Matter, springing from , 2.362; in returning to u., 2.362; perfect totality, or absolute u., 2.363; original u., 2.363; u. is Nothingness, 2.363; springing from u., 2.363; return to u., 2.364.


VERISIMILAR:  v. style, 2.433.

VERISIMILITUDE:  deceive by v., 2.433.


WIT:  levity and w. or humour, 1.77.

WITTICISM:  a happy w., 2.460.

WITTICISMS:  chief w., 1.77.

WITTY:  the w. exaggerated into the burlesque, 1.58.


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Notes:

None.


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[S:1 - PCV, 1966] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - An Index of Poe's Critical Vocabulary (Dameron and Stagg) (Index to the Letters)