Text: J. L. Dameron and L. C Stagg, “Index to Criticism, A-H,” An Index of Poe’s Critical Vocabulary in Poe’s Collected Works, (1966), pp. 12-25 (This material is protected by copyright)


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


CRITICISM [[A-H]]

Scroll down, or select letter:


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


AESTHETICAL:  a. psychology, 9.117; dogmas and doctrines ... a., 11.252.

AESTHETICS:  to rhapsody and a., 11.251; doggerel a. of the time, 11.256.

ALLEGORICAL: bizarre fiction, partly a., 8.231; all a. personifications, 9.203; a. meaning, 9.280; a. personification, 9.280; a. character, 11.261; proper a. attribute, 11.261; a. natures, 11.262; a. meaning, 11.263; a. moral, 11.266; a. instruction, 12.11; a. emblem, 12.75; effective a. poem, 12.174; a. meaning, 12.174; an a. enigma, 12.174; half a. ... compositions, 13.19; half a. compositions, 13.188; a. or emblematical verses, 15.100; a. conduct is mawkish, 15.248.

ALLEGORIES:  all a. are contemptible, 12.174; (as a.), 12.174.

ALLEGORY:  in this famous a. [on Dante], 8.164; plan is essentially distinct from a., 10.37; metaphor always running into a., 10.130; Pure a., 10.130; all metaphor or all a., 10.130; unsustained a., 10.130; mawkish a. of ancient theology, 10.141; it [“Orion”] is an a., 11.258; softened this a., 11.258; exaggerated a., 12.8; a. ... respectable a term, 12.8; “The Sea of the Mind” is another a., 12.174; the strain of a., 13.147; In defence of a., 13.148; the happiest a., 13.148; as a., 13.148; a. ... made to enforce a truth, 13.148; if a. ... establishes a fact, 13.148; worth all the a. in the world, 13.148; ability to keep the a. out of sight, 13.149; Of a. properly handled, 13.149; too fond of a., 13.154; a. is at war, 13.154; coxcombry which leads him [Bulwer] ... into a., 14.91; existing apart from the a., 15.100.

ARABESQUE:  rigidly a., 14.104; small a. devices, 14.107; images of more than a. monstrosity, 15.241.

ARABESQUERIE: a. of its rhythm, 12.16.

ARTICLE:  and a., 8.50; by a., 8.50; a. I in this number, 8.82; a. II ... very clever, 8.84; greater part of the a., 8.84; a. III is headed, 8.84; a. IV. “Deontology; ... ,” 8.85; a. V. ... excellently well toned, 8.85; whole a. is excellent, 8.86; sixth a. is a review, 8.86; a. VII is headed, 8.87; a. VIII is, 8.88; a. IX is, 8.88; this a. written with great ability, 8.89; the offensive a., 8.89; any a., in the Necromancy, 8.94; title this a. is headed, 8.118; the body of the a., 8.126; the heading of this a., 8.127; the heading of this a., 8.164; each a. in good taste, 8.177; inserted an a., 8.187; the heading of this a., 8.208; first a. in the list, 8.259; the second a. is, 8.260; This a. would ... make the fortune, 8.261; the a. itself, 8.321; a tolerably long a., 8.329; ashamed of this a., 8.329; a. on Osteology, 9.30; really good “brief a.,” 9.46; in the “brief a.,” 9.46; the whole of the a., 9.47; a. on Gin shops, 9.48; a rifacimento of the a., 9.92; a. of Bulwer, 9.144; the a. ... evidence of a truth but little understood, 9.145; in an a. written, 9.175; a. on New England Coal, 9.293; heading of this a., 9.306; a. prepared for this journal, 10.3; Since penning this a., 10.11N; in an a. in the New York Review, 10.83; our youth’s a., 10.135; well instanced in an a., 10.158; this a. ... called a review, 10.158; an a. [by Mr. Stephens] on this head, 10.180; pleased with an a., 10.213; a very excellent a., 10.213; a. upon Ranke’s “History of the Popes,” 11.4; a. in which ... strength, 11.4; the leading a. of the month, 11.25; controvert in an a., 11.66; the a. in question, 11.82; a. was furnished, 11.101; obvious meaning of this a., 11.111; Throughout this a., 11.112; in an a. called “William Wilson,” 11.112; longest a., 11.114; subject of this a., 11.133; long a. worth reading, 11.145; any one a., 11.191; limits of this a., 11.194; latest acknowledged a., 11.225; one a. in ... contemptible appendix, 11.242; an a. entitled “Marginalia,” 12.74; an a. so much admired, 12.180; writer of this a., 12.186; only a. which remains, 12.222; in our previous a., 12.234; looking ... over her [Miss Walter’s] a., 13.10; a. written by Mr. Charles Dickens, 13.31; one particular a., 13.96; of the present a., 13.131; in an a. called “Marginalia,” 13.131; the whole a., 13.192; a. is not original, 14.40; Mr. Duyckinck’s a., 14.73; American Magazine a., 14.73; the cursory a., 14.113; writer of this a., 14.119; writer of this a., 14.121; a. on “Secret Writing,” 14.136; uncommon nature of this a., 14.137; an a. written in simple cipher, 14.143; commented in our first a., 14.146; requested to compose an a., 14.162; month of starvation and the a., 14.162; hinting that the a., 14.162; the a. is demanded, 14.163; runs over this a., 14.163; write this a., 14.168; the beginning of this a., 14.244; in the course of this a., 14.253; a newspaper a., 15.12; a magazine a. ... easy and clever, 15.22; an a. ... in Godey’s Magazine, 15.24; an a. called “Marginalia,” 15.48; the successful a., 15.56; a. entitled “The Gift of Prophecy,” 15.61; in an a. furnished, 15.67; a. ... not written by myself [Poe], 15.75; the whole a. sings, 15.104; a prefatory a., 15.127; a. prior to publication, 15.129; that detestable a., 15.141; in our last a., 15.164; an a. which attracted very general attention, 15.175; this a. took amazingly well, 15.176; letter attributed to him [Dr. W. E. Channing] in the a., 15.176; autograph a., 15.177; writer of this a., 15.178; The a. ... alluded to, 15.179; an a. on the subject of the “Pickwick Papers,” 15.195; This a. ... abounded in ... denunciation, 15.195; writer of this a., 15.196; a. will be concluded, 15.208; conclude the a. and year together, 15.209N; a. merely, 15.209N; writer of this a., 15.241; Our second a., 15.247; in a magazine a., 16.71; the preceding a., 16.110; the whole a., 16.123; the a. in “The New Monthly,” 16.133; an anonymous a., 16.134; an a. in ... “The Review,” 16.148.

ARTICLES:  fourteen different a., 8.118; before us ... seventy-three a., 8.159; similar a. in the Diary of a Physician, 8.264; a. in the book, 8.265; a. ... creditable to their authors, 8.334; sly a., 9.45; who peruse both these a., 9.47; the author of these a., 10.133; all prize a., 10.140; a. here are anonymous, 10.188; a. from Dickens, 10.207; a. which arrested our attention, 10.212; leading a. in the London Quarterly Review, 10.225; a. of interest, 11.100; some of these a. in the higher merits, 11.103; a. at random, 11.110; some of the a. are able, 11.157; “ ... biography and best a.” solicited, 11.240; a. figure ... over Bryant, 11.241; Her [Mrs. Ellet’s] a. are, 13.214; upon such a., 14.38; the consecrated a., 14.45; foreign a. so affect us, 14.73; longer a., 15.12; (chiefly newspaper a.), 15.17; a. entitled “The Haunted Merchant,” 15.20; brevity of its a., 15.60; a. ... designated by an asterisk, 15.73; eloquent and well-put a., 15.74; usual magazine a., 15.104; various a. for magazines and annuals, 15.109; at various times furnished a., 15.115; racy a., 15.195; furnished many a., 15.205; a. ... attributed to his [Professor Palfrey’s] pen, 15.208; many a. of high merit, 15.215; a. which possessed ... precision of style, 15.222; many excellent a., 15.231; short prose a., 15.236; a. breathe the true spirit, 15.237; many a. of merit and popularity, 15.246; a. in our Reviews, 15.258; a. of Materia Medica, 16.93.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


BEAUTIES:  display of ... b., 8.105; b. and their faults, 8.131; the b. and the faults, 8.131; the b. of Don Juan, 8.310; lingers on the b., 9.102; b. of the Old World, 9.162; many b. ... of thought and expression, 9.278; higher b., 9.279; either of faults or b., 9.295; various b., 10.37; idiosyncratic b., 10.73; ideal b., 10.76; has ... more b.. 10.78; b. ... of a high order, 10.78; Bulwerian b., 10.133; minor b., 10.141; faults, confounding them with b., 10.184; b. of the work, 11.41; b. of a work, 11.41; b. are not wholly admirable, 11.41; presence of b., 11.248; poetical b., 11.266; appreciate the b., 11.266; b. of this ... poem, 11.266; multitudinous b., 11.274; b. intrinsic and supreme, 11.275; b. of this book, 12.29 of b., 12.42; b. ... of her favorite, 12.144; b. of the work, 13.194; for the b. of the work, 14.281; b. of the original, 15.191.

BEAUTIFUL:  this b. little Annual, 8.50; narratives ... more b. than the rest, 8.92; gentle and b. mystery, 8.95; b., intellectual, and spirituelle, 8.96; a truly b. ... conception, 8.96; impressions of the b., 8.97; quiet valley of the b., 8.127; something equally b., 8.128; a more b. book, 8.172; delicacies of the b., 8.174; b. poetess, 8.187; what otherwise is b., 8.218; admiration and study of the b., 8.231; The b. little work, 8.253; sense of the b., 8.282; more b. volumes, 8.285; higher manifestations of the b., 8.296; moral sentiment ... of the b., 8.301; sense of the b., 8.302; b. poem, 8.306; quatrain ... although b., 8.317; b. lines, 8.317; b. specimen of typography, 8.334; b. valley of the Mohawk, 9.27; proper sense of the b., 9.43; criticisms ... are ... very b., 9.63; a b. poem, 9.101; She [Gertrude] is b., 9.107; Constanza, very b., 9.108; the b. maidens, 9.149; so b. a little volume, 9.174; she was very b., 9.180; more b. than Apollo, 9.188; exceedingly b., 9.196; verses ... as b., 9.200; of the more b. portions, 9.283; All this is b., 9.292; Waterfowl is very b., 9.297; concluding verses, b. as they stand, 9.298; beginning, middle, and end ... each b., 9.299; lines, although b., 9.303; legitimate items of the b., 9.304; enjoyment of the b., 9.304; appreciation of the b., 9.305; a b. and fairy-like creature, 10.31; b. fable, 10.37; intensely b., 10.39; b. ballad, 10.51; of the b., 10.65; upper current is ... b., 10.66; [“Thanatopsis”] ... undoubtedly b., 10.88; equally b., 10.95; b. confusion of thought, 10.136; b. little poem, 10.142; conception is indeed most b., 10.149; pathos ... truly b. and deep, 10.155; appreciation of the right, the b., 10.213; young and b. enthusiast, 10.221; present edition ... is ... very b., 11.9; b. poems, 11.18; truly b. poems, 11.23; b. rhythm, 11.23; higher manifestations of the b., 11.24; b. stanzas, 11.25; line italicized ... as b., 11.35; of his b. niece, 11.45; sense of the b., 11.71; “the b.” ... the chief attribute of the Muse, 11.73; truly b. poem, 11.80; b. poem, 11.81; each and all b., 11.105; the idea of the b., 11.108; purely b., 11.109; tales ... are b., 11.110; b. little volume, 11.114; she [Geraldine] is b., 11.136; appropriate and b. image, 11.162; strikingly b., 11.168; stanza is especially b., 11.200; quatrain ... although b., 11.202; b. lines of Wordsworth, 11.202; b. poem, 11.203; more b. ... poetry, 11.223; b. in the Latin, 11.227; instinct of the b., 11.244; subject is exquisitely b., 11.244; forms of the b., 11.254; sentiment of the b., 11.255; combinations of b. forms, 11.256; story ... is b., 11.259; “ ... stillness b.,” 11.278; (however b. ...), 11.279; conclusion is ... b., 12.14; less b., 12.39; b. ... poem, 12.87; appreciation of the b., 12.105; b. governess, 12.117; one of the most b. compositions, 12.135; b. poem, 12.143; truly b. throughout, 12.175; b. smile, 12.187; b. volume, 12.193; three remarkably b. lines, 12.193; b. lips, 12.210; “Fair Ines” is so b., 12.220; shorter compositions ... are exceedingly b., 12.231; appreciation of the b., 12.239; keen appreciation of the b., 12.240; very b. poems, 12.244; appreciation of the true and b., 12.247; keen appreciation of the ... physically b., 12.255; poem is truly b., 12.260; so truly ... b. a prosopopeia, 13.19; “b. Gitanilla of Cervantes,” 13.60; passages ... commended as b., 13.73; b. annual “The Gift,” 13.96; “The Waterfowl” is very b., 13.134; [passage is especially b. ...]*, 13.137; inexpressibly b., 13.160; anything but b., 13.177; beyond measure, 13.181; In no respect can she [Mrs. Osgood] be called “b.,” 13.192; most b. ballad of its kind, 13.218; inexpressibly b., 13.218; b. in face and form, 13.226; a valley so b., 14.4; b. and perfectly well-coloured illustrations, 14.96; impression of the b., 14.102; contemplation of the b., 14.197; consequence of contemplating “the b.,” 14.198; “ ... death of a b. woman ... ,” 14.201; a peculiarly b. one, 14.216; rhymes, such as ... b. and dutiful, 14.224; “dutiful” and “b.,” 14.225; the first syllable of “b.,” 14.226; first syllable of “dutiful” and that of “b.,” t 14.227; a very b. poem, 14.236; Taste informs us of the b., 14.273; sense of the b., 14.273; from the contemplation of the b., 14.275; poem ... is especially b., 14.281; less b. (or grand), 15.14N; a b. woman, 15.29; the b. in motion, 15.32; radiantly b. smile, 15.32; to be called b., 15.34; quatrain ... although b., 15.55; b. lines, 15.55; keen appreciation of the b., 15.62; keen appreciation of the b., 15.92; anything but b., 15.95; b. volume, 15.97; a worshipper of the b., 15.104; be termed b., 15.104; b., intellectual, spirituelle, 15.110; limits of the b., 15.117; admirer of the b., 15.122; ( ... love of the b.), 15.122; appreciation of the b., 15.123; forehead ... truly b., 15.137; uniform and b. appearance, 15.146; Both are b., 15.147; very b. and wafered, 15.163; unsettled ideas of the b., 15.168; writing ... remarkably neat and b., 15.170; the most regularly b., 15.180; erroneous ideas of the b., 15.186; Both are b., 15.187; unsettled ideas of the b., 15.197; MS. ... considered b., 15.206; deficiency in the sense of the b., 15.208; delights in the grand, rather than in the b., 15.216; a very b. French hand, 15.220; b. little poem, 15.230; chirography ... b., 15.230; chirography ... very b., 15.231; a keen sense of the b., 15.237; very b. little poem, 15.239; a b. MS., 15.245; b. poems, 15.248; love of the b., 15.251; called b. by the ladies, 15.252; keen sense of the b., 15.254; be called b., 15.255; keen sense ... of the b., 15.257; ladies, not very b., 16.42; purely b., 16.51; “ ... shapes” ... (however b. in themselves), 16.58; exceedingly b., 16.79; a b. thought, 16.145.

BEAUTIFULLY:  b. expresses it, 8.57; end is b. managed, 8.99; b. gotten up, 8.102; volume b. printed, 8.117; most b. filled the vacuum, 9.13; more b., 9.64; was b. gotten up, 9.75; b. stereotyped, 9.104; b. printed, 9.166; so b. filled up, 9.196; a fine idea, b. expressed, 9.280; b. illustrated “Conchology,” 10.26; b. printed, 10.27; b.-painted the difference, 10.36; a b., written treatise, 10.158; a story b. developed, 10.225; b. printed volume, 12.167; b. and most appropriately, 12.175; b. printed, 12.250; b. printed book, 13.176; b. posted up, 13.204; most b. printed book, 15.95; b. formed, 15.162; b. bound volumes, 15.182; b. painted, 16.49.

BEAUTY:  intoxicated with ... b., 8.66; passages of great eloquence and b., 8.72; rare b., 8.72; its chief b., 8.91; b. of style, 8.91; b. stand her in the stead of the lion of Una, 8.97; especial b., 8.103; a passage of surpassing b., 8.131; sonorous b. of its expression, 8.133; Miss Gould ... to seek, b., 8.135; analytical love of b., 8.174; exquisite b., 8.176; shrine of b., 8.190; the queen’s b., 8.292; of great b., 8.302; the moral sentiment of b., 8.303; natural objects of b. or grandeur, 8.304; ideal b., 8.310; lines ... of great b., 8.314; images of real b., 8.314; individual passages of ... b., 9.16; Natural and Moral b., 9.65; loftiest b., 9.74; b. of the lines, 9.75; with equal delicacy and b., 9.93; idea of the b. of the school, 9.96; conveying either the b., 9.102; b. of the line, 9.102; pre-eminent b., 9.103; b. and vigor, 9.111; majestic b., 9.146; original b., 9.151; passage of great ... b., 9.159; with great facility and b., 9.195; comprehensiveness, and b., 9.208; rare b., 9.259; b. is of a high order, 9.282; a high ideal b., 9.285; rare b., 9.292; general b., 9.296; great rhythmical b., 9.298; general b., 9.300; most elevated b., 9.300; ideal b., 9.302; perfect b., 9.303; of no b. like that, 9.304; b. ... of nature, 9.304; discrimination in regard to b., 9.304; praised for the b., 10.30; in a greater b., 10.32; turning the blemish into a b., 10.37; b. of Unity, Totality, Truth, 10.40; the root of all b., 10.41; sought as a b., 10.42; passage of great b., 10.54; b. of sentiment, 10.55; poetical b., 10.56; b. of her maidens, 10.61; glimpse of b. presented, 10.66; ethereal b. beyond, 10.66; sum of ... great b., 10.8; exceeding b. of “Alciphron,” 10.70; highest degree of b., 10.73; a b. more august, 10.74; personification ... is its main b.. 10.75; b. of the ... airs, 10.95; totality of b., 10.120; b. of simplicity, 10.127; b. of style, 10.157; minute b., 10.175; b. ... placed in the fairest light, 11.41; inform us of b., 11.71; with displaying the b., 11.71; appreciation of the b., 11.72; to reach the b. above, 11.72; ecstasy of the b. beyond the grave, 11.72; thirst for supernal b., 11.73; a b. ... not afforded the soul, 11.73; b. ... no possible combination of these forms would fully produce, 11.73; creation of b., 11.73; creation of supernal b., 11.75; elements of that b., 11.75; Rhythmical Creation of b., 11.75; the limits of b., 11.75; b. is always his [Keats’] aim, 11.76; novel moods of b. 11.76; general acceptation of the term b., 11.77; b. of simple-mindedness as a genuine thesis, 11.77; b. of childlike confidence and innocence, 11.77; pure b., 11.77; b. heightened into the sublime, 11.77; b. of bold courage, 11.78; points of b., 11.78; for the legitimate aim, b., 11.79; moral b., 11.80; realization of its dreams of b., 11.80; b. can be better treated in the poem, 11.109; b. of style, 11.142; remarkable b., 11.161; The b. ... of river scenery, 11.163; elements of poetic b., 11.176; thesis is b., 11.177; and b. alone, 11.177; passages of real b., 11.199; rhythmical personification of existing or real b., 11.225; rhythmical creation of b.,” 11.225; “creation of b., 11.225; “ ... existing or ideal b.,” 11.235; conception of its b., 11.236; rhythmical creation of b., 11.239; true poem is the creation of b., 11.244; rare b., 11.245 of this b., 11.245; creation of b., 11.254; conception of pure b., 11.255; impressions of b., 11.255; wilder b., 11.256; physical b., 11.260; effect is only a b., 11.265; intense b., 11.267; naked b., 11.271; human b., 11.278; dwell purely on the b. (moral or physical), 11.278; passages of great b., 12.9; result is ... b., 12.38; pure Imagination chooses, from either b. or deformity, 12.38; the compound ... partaking ... of sublimity or b., .12.38; b. of the things combined, 12.38; fabricates that b., 12.39; “ ... b. of the imagery,” 12.64; b. of woman, 12.126; b. far nearer to perfection, 12.132; b. of the school, 12.141; conveying ... the b. and playfulness of the fawn, 12.144; pre-eminent b., 12.145; career ... of b., 12.186; sentiment of the b. of motion, 12.188; b. is of the richest ... character, 12.212; whose b., 13.39; passages ... understood to have b., 13.73; extreme b. and purity, 13.80; poem of much b., 13.99; reports touching Elfrida’s b., 13.109; object of poetry ... is b., 13.112; warm appreciation of the b. of nature, 13.130; the sleeping b., 13.147; a sense of b., 13.158; full extent of b., 13.161; voluptuous sense of b., 13.162; Elfrida’s extraordinary b., 13.176; b. and consciousness of it, 13.177; “ ... class of the impressions of b. ... ,” 13.180; worshipper of b., 13.192; in sensibility to b., 13.193; b. ... should be considered in the light of an axiom, 13.194; is not b., 13.194; fail to perceive the b., 13.206; sense of b., 13.209; enthusiastic in her [Mrs. Lewis’] admiration of b., 13.216; full extent of b., 13.219; voluptuous sense of b., 13.221; universally acknowledged b., 14.99; ideas of magnificence and b., 14.102; of an ethereal b., 14.108; of no little personal b., 14.151; to b. in its common acceptation, 14.153; to all the forms of b., 14.153; either in accuracy or in b., 14.157; b. of MS., 14.158; orations ... on the b. ... of robbing the Literary Europe, 14.161; “ ... b. of its plumage; ... ,” 14.173; exquisite sense of b., 14.175; appreciation of b., 14.178; “And b. draws ... ,” 14.178; In lauding b., 14.183; To Genius b. gives life, 14.183; b. ... sole legitimate province of the poem, 14.197; men speak of b., 14.197; b. as the province of the poem, 14.198; b. ... is the excitement ... of the soul, 14.198; b. ... the atmosphere and the essence of the poem, 14.198; b. as my province, 14.198; b. of whatever kind, 14.198; “ ... allies itself to b.: ... ,” 14.201; on the subject of b., 14.204; rhymes, such as b. and duty, 14.224; poem of great b., 14.240, in a word, to b., 14.273; no mere appreciation of the b., 14.273; effort to reach the b. above, 14.273; creation of supernal b., 14.275; The Rhythmical Creation of b., 14.275; In the contemplation of b., 14.275; b. ... inclusive of the sublime, 14.275; b. the province of the poem, 14.275; b. ... the atmosphere and the real essence of the poem, 14.276; the sleeping b. in the wax-works, 14.278; the higher manifestations of true b., 14.279; Human Aspiration for Supernal b., 14.290; in the b. of woman, 14.291; b. itself, 15.13N; pure imagination chooses, from ... b. or deformity, 15.13N; sublimity or b., 15.13N; sublimity or b., 15.13N; b. ... its sole object, 15.14N; purity and perfection of b., 15.15; b. which is unusual, 15.31; ideal b., 15.53; Elfrida’s extraordinary b., 15.95; b. and consciousness of it, 15.96; impressions of b., 15.98; madness and her b., 15.111; moral b., 15.117; alive to b., 15.118; the main b., 15.192; one great b. of his [Longfellow’s] poetry, 15.192; sense of b., 15.193; a tragedy full of b., 15.252; b. ... apparent by flashes, 15.260; a b. rather than ... a blemish, 16.29; poetical b., 16.41; human b., 16.56; the b. (Moral or physical), 16.56; Pythagoras’ definition of b., 16.71; b. ... through ... adaptation to the tone of the poem, 16.80; “ ... no exquisite b. without ... strangeness ... ,” 16.85; b. of earth, 16.86; b. of Heaven, 16.86; b. of the parallel, 16.96; a b. nearer to perfection, 16.120; result will be ... b., 16.121; impressions of b., 16.121; the root of all b., 16.137; sought as a b., 16.137; “ ... impressions of b. ... ,” 16.144; either b. or Deformity, 16.155; the compound ... partaking ... of b., 16.156; b. or sublimity, 16.156; b. which is at once its sole object, 16.156; true b., 16.164.

BURLESQUE:  considered a mere b., 8.77; the actual b., 8.145; a more laughable b., 8.181; intended it as a b., 8.181; “The Song” is b., 8.261; a laughable b., 8.264; an air of the b., 8.305; low b., 8.309; b. of some portions of Alnwick Castle, 8.314; specimen of mere b., 8.329; passages of the merest b., 9.74; inundated with the b., 9.77; in the way of b., 10.182; a b., or what not, 11.163; sundry touches of the b., 11.164; low b., 11.199; merest b., 11.201; intended either for satire or b., 12.107; designed as a b., 12.116; schemes in the way of b., 12.133; meant for a b., 12.133; an unintentional b., 12.134; excellent in the way of b., 13.165; a b. poem, 14.64; purposes of b. alone, 14.247; designed as a b., 15.29; apt at b., 15.93; The extreme of b., 15.199; principles of the b., 16.17.

BURLESQUED:  deficiency in spelling ... b., 8.99; style had been b., 15.176.

BURLESQUES:  the greater number of ... b., 11.76; grossest of b., 11.195; b. of the supposed writer’s ... style, 15.176.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


CAUSALITY [FACULTY OF]:  powers of c., 8.284; organs of c., 8.285; forehead ... indicates c. and comparison, 15.7; man’s powers of c., 16.31.

CHARACTER:  The principal c. in the novel, 8.7; c. and manners, 8.46; c. and manners, 8.46; c. and expression, 8.47; has transformed c., 8.52; c. of a young lady, 8.52; no c., 8.60; c. of a Methodist preacher, 8.68; of the c. of Elsie Bell, 8.70; a c. which we may be permitted to consider original, 8.70; c. of this gentleman, 8.95; his final c., 8.96; c. in a novel, 8.97; the c. of a speaker, 8.98; sketching of c., 8.108; the c. and the actions attempted to be portrayed, 8.115; change wrought in the boy’s c., 8.120; a Methodist of no very enticing c., 8.121; habits, and c. are well painted, 8.148; the last c. ... introduced, 8.217; a better sketcher of c., 8.223; private c. of the noble Roman, 8.224; delineations of passion and c., 8.226; understanding of c., 8.257; Southern c. in particular, 8.257; of human c. exclusively, 8.257; the c. ... is neither very original, 8.261; intense observation of c., 8.264; size, c., and other qualities of the equipped, 8.294; c. of Lafitte, 9.108; in delineations of c., 9.112-113; applied so very frequently to the c., 9.115; In depicting c., 9.125; no c. whatsoever, 9.125; In his [Mr. Lee’s] c. of Nigger Tom, 9.136; influence upon a c. unchanging, 9.137; common to all c., 9.154; of Pericles, 9.154; Countess Pungstall is a c., 9.171; to develop his [Balcombe’s] c., 9.245; the c. of Mary Scott, 9.’260; in female c., 9.260; a c. ... dwelt upon, 9.261; a c. to be met with every day, 9.261; modelled in c., 9.302; vigor and breath in the conception of c., 10.27; careless c. of Undine, 10.36; c. of the soulless Undine, 10.39; modelled in c., 10.89; in this c., 10.94; stigma upon her [Catherine Beaufort’s] c., 10.115; delineation of c., 10.125; c. of Quilp, 10.151; originality ... in c. especially, 10.1.original combinations of c.), 10.153; the invention of c., 10.153; his whole c.[o1d man in “The Old Curiosity Shop”], 10.154; the whole conception of ... , c., 10.154; the chief c. [in “Undine”], 10.155; the c. of one Nancy [in “Joseph Rushbrook”], 10.200; the c. of Aubrey [in “Ten Thousand a Year”], 10.212; in c. ... the writer fails, 10.212; peculiarities of person or c., 10.212; subsequent c., 11.55; Mr. Dickens as a delineator of c., 11.61; not surpassed by any c., 11.62; Its [raven’s] c. might have performed, 11.67; of c. in humble condition, 11.88; by no means original c., 11.93; of her [Geraldine’s] c., 11.136; c. . is given, 11.137; considered as the principal c., 11.207; make up the c., 11.208; of manifesting c., 11.211; depicting of c., 11.212; c. of the Tuscarora, 11.214; pieces of mere c.-painting, 11.214; allegorical c., 11.261; speculative c. of Orion, 11.267; womanly c., 12.4; exaggeration of c., 12.118; little application to his [Mr. Augustus Fogg’s] c., 12.118; truthful representations of c., 12.126; the artless c. of the speaker, 12.145; the only c., 12.186; the c. of the Prince, 12.188; c. ... Mrs. Mowatt is ... adapted, 12.190; misconceives the c., 12.211; conceptions of c., 12.211; the leading c., 12.212; settle ... his [Hamlet’s] true c., 12.227; Mr. Pickering’s c., 12.253; drama out of its range of mere c., 13.27; whose c. is a mingled web, 13.38; soul of the drama of c., 13.47; a lady altogether without c., 13.48; a drama of c., 13.51; revolution in the c. of Tortesa, 13.51; representation of no human c., 13.51; true c., 13.65; have no c., 13.73; saintly c., 13.81; c. of Elfrida ... portrayed with great force, 13.109; upon this c. she [Mrs. Osgood] has ... put forth her strength, 13.110; poetical c., 13.112; combination of events with c., 13.112; to delineation of c., 13.176; c. of Elfrida, 13.177; the c. of Scaramouch, 14.46; c. of the ancient Bacchus, 14.48; no c. at all, 15.17; not a c. ... not ... well-understood [in “Fashion”], 15.29; delineations of c., 15.57; c. strange to us sojourners, 15.84; salient points of c., 15.84; each c. ... permitted to develop itself, 15.85; the pedagogical c., 15.86; touches of c., 15.86; delineation of c., 15.95; the c. of Elfrida, 15.96; the c. happily drawn, 15.109; no slight distinction where c. is concerned, 15.110; discrepancy between the words and c. of the speaker, 15.111; depicting of c. itself, 15.111; the amplification of c., 15.119; c. ... exists in the bosom of his originator, 15.200; portraiture of men ... in respect to c., 15.210; c. of Undine, 16.49; development of c., 16.171.

CHARACTER’S:  in any c. mouth, 12.118.

CHARACTERS:  the prominent c., 8.8; delineation of ... female c., 8.8; fortunes of the leading c., 8.11; principal c. in the plot, 8.57; The c. have, 8.60; new c., 8.68; c. ... seldom been surpassed, 8.73; The principal c., 8.79; prominent c., 8.82; can originate such c., 8.98; historical c., 8.98; interwoven such fictitious incidents and c., 8.147; historical c., 8.150; c. in the Iliad, 8.164; All the good c., 8.201; all the bad c., 8.201; The principal c., 8.225; accurate delineation of the scenery, c., 8.257; real incidents and c., 8.258; c. of a Georgian Court-House fight, 8.260; chief c., 9.71; c. of Tecumseh and Elkswatawa, 9.122; the action of his [James S. French’s] various c., 9.123; the chief c., 9.177; neither of which c., 9.197; the principal c., 9.199; original c., so called, 9.261; c. ... are deficient, 10.29; extends to his [William Gilmore Simms’] c., 10.53; original c., 10.125; the c. of Sir Edward Lytton Bulwer, 10.130; admirably drawn c., 10.152; all the c., 11.54; c. of the drama, 11.211; c. are broadly distinctive, 11.266; include in one category both the events and the c., 12.116; routine of stage c., 12.118; c. are well sustained, 12.210; error of attempting to expound his [Shakespeare’s] c., 12.226; the old c., 13.36; tendency to develope ... the c., 13.62; its [“The Spanish Student”’s] c., 13.73; one of the principal c., 14.53; All the c. are properly speaking Chaldaic, 14.71; Its c. [in “Tortesa”], 15.17; c. ... drawn from life, 15.210.

COMPARISON [FACULTY OF]: Reflecting Faculties, viz. ... c., 8.254; organs ... c., 8.285; faculty of c., 8.295; faculty of c., 8.295; powers of c., 8.296; Faculty of mere c., 8.300; springing altogether from c., 8.305; faculty of mere c., 10.64; appealing only to our faculties of c., 10.130; causality and c., 15.7.

CRITICISM:  matters of literary c., 8.94; c. upon it [an author’s book], 8.147; have undergone its c., 8.168; the same tone of c., 8.176; independent c., 8.237; present state of American c., 8.276; general character of our c., 8.277N; deliberate c., 8.277N; unphilosophical and adulatory tenor of our c., 8.298N; stage c., 8.322; late c. received, 8.333; severity and an indiscreetness of c., 8.335; as scarcely deserving c., 9.50; a matter of hyper-c., 9.65; c. alluded to, 9.163; grief of all true c., 10.40; such c. as this, 10.70; just c., 10.141; In the way of c., 10.158; c. upon these extraordinary compositions, 10.178; corrupt nature of our ordinary c., 10.185; rigorous and self-sustaining c., 10.187; useless to expect c. from periodicals, 10.189; severity of c., 10.192; true c., 10.193; positively beneath c., 10.219; serious c., 10.220; literary c., 11.1; provinces of c., 11.2; our c. ... in some danger, 11.3; the review or c., 11.3; anything but c., 11.3; Macaulay’s nearest approach to c., 11.4; nothing whatever to do with that c., 11.4; c. ... does not exist, 11.4; c. ... is, consequently, nothing, 11.5; unique spirit of true c., 11.5; That a c. “now” should be different, 11.5; from a c. at any previous period, 11.5; describes a c. to be, 11.6; c. is not ... an essay, 11.6; can be nothing but — a c., 11.6; a word, “C.,” 11.6; no word but “c.,” 11.6; to limit literary c., 11.7; c. ... no “test of opinion,” 11.7; c. ... is only properly employed, 11.7; c. which affects to despise, 11.8; (with little ... c. ... ), 11.10; amenable to c., 11.13; test of a proper c., 11.16; the thing is called a c., 11.101; in the way of c., 11.126; c. of the newspaper paragraphs, 11.132; with a species of c., 11.132; leading errors of a c., 11.133; single object of c., 11.147; by the c. of the work, 11.153; material for c., 11.156; discriminative c., 11.157; against c. in general, 11.173; agree with this c., 11.194; let our c., 11.225; c. that we ... could give, 12.3; this is the c., 12.13; British c., 12.13; Blackwood c., 12.13; The c. ended, 12.42; the c. in question, 12.43; repelling a c., 12.85; dealt in c., 12.86; class of c., 12.86; tendency of all c., 12.86; principles of c., 12.104; sets at naught all c., 12.129; era of c., 12.202; canons of c., 12.206; irrelevancy of the paper as a c., 12.238; in c. especially, 12.239; c. is ... superficial, 12.240; needless c., 12.260; columns of c., 13.7; discriminative c., 13.37; speculative c., 13.53; detailed c., 13.55; whole c. proving nothing, 13.97; c. of the conservatives, 13.143; the c. which condemns, 13.143; a c. on Simms, 13.150; by such a c., 13.171; in penning a c., 14.74; to present them [readers] with a c., 14.74; applicable to any c., 14.74; envy of c., 14.176; caustic c., 14.281; a c. on Bryant, 15.1; few attempts at c., 15.17; attempted c., 15.22; a kind of ... c., 15.44; silly, condemnatory c., 15.75; racy articles, in the way of c., 15.195; c. upon poetry, 15.239; die of a c., 16.74; Wilson-izing in c., 16.100; common c., 16.111; anomalous c., 16.116; the German c., 16.116; The German c., 16.116; author of the c., 16.146; c. needs a thorough regeneration, 16.148; c. ... beneath contempt, 16.158; style of c., 16.166.

CRITICISMS:  c. on sculpture and painting, 9.63; c. of the Editor, 9.96; political and theatrical c., 9.142; his [Hazlitt’s] Theatrical c., 9.143; a series of c., 9.143; c. on ... genius, 10.195; the random c., 11.150; whose c., 11.224; c. on style, 11.239; c. conscientiously say the same, 12.86; c. ... make the author ... contemptible, 12.87; The c. of the Editor, 12.141; c. of Augustus William Schlegel, 13.43; c. were discriminative, 13.107; c. of similar tone, 13.142; c. ... little effect on the popular taste, 13.142; reminding us of the various c., 13.169; ( ... some commendatory c. ...), 13.172; elaborate c., 13.193; series of c., 15.22; well written retrospective c., 15.249; a hundred c., 16.109; growling ... over their c., 16.173.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


DIDACTIC:  a d. piece, 9.269; a poem essentially d., 9.279; d. sonnet, 9.295; d. termination, 9.297; d. conclusion, 9.300; d. subjects ... beneath the province of true poesy, 10.141; d. moral ... the under-current of a poetical thesis, 11.68; d. moral, 11.79; somewhat d., 11.82; d. essay, 11.254; themes are ... d., 12.14; a d. poem, 13.10; a d. poem, in our opinion, 13.10; heresy of The d., 14.271; marked leaning to the d., 15.33; too d. for ... general taste, 15.195; moral and d. writers, 15.226; toward the d., 16.101.

DIDACTICISM: in spite of ... ultra-d., 10.218; obtrusive nature of their d., 11.68; d. ... the prevalent tone, 11.69; chargeable with d., 11.77; error of d., 11.247; to introduce d., 11.254; d. of its design, 12.11; misplaced d., 12.33; d. of Wordsworth, 16.150.

DIDACTICS:  mere d., 9.305; d. ... out of place, 11.67.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


EPIC:  an e. of high rank, 8.123; essentially e. rather than Dramatic, 8.225; noblest e., 10.44; difference between an e. and an epigram, 10.166; could compose an e., 11.148; Mr. Horne’s e., 11.244; great e., 12.8; sustained effort has accomplished an e., 13.150; certainly not the e., 13.150; aggregate effect of any e., 13.151; in its [“The Iliad”’s] form of e., 13.151; Of the modern e., 13.152; suppression of that e., 14.47; e. poems, 14.67; effect of even the best e., 14.267; granting the e. intention, 14.267; modern e. is ... blindfold imitation, 14.267; accomplished an e., 14.268; forbear praising the e., 14.268; the e. mania, 14.271; Horne’s noble e. ‘Orion,” 15.124; [“The Antediluvians”] the only tolerable American e., 15.258; of an e., 16.67; noblest e., 16.139.

EPICS:  e. ... possessed of this unintentional excellence, 10.182; as the e. have it, 11.27; e. ... an imperfect sense of Art, 11.107; e. ... by the dozen, 13.165; one of the noblest e., 14.233; the e. of Hell-Fire Montgomery, 16.4.

EPICISTS:  the rest of the e., 13.86.

EPIGRAM:  mingled e., 13.184; an e. upon the subject, 14.60; e. upon a picture of Saint Catherine, 14.61; e. of Miguel de Cervantes, 14.61; an e. shot in the ear, 16.129; truth, ... injures an e., 16.155.

EPIGRAMMATIC:  e. nicety and point of the language, 8.137; an e. spirit, 10.70; style ... e., 10.141; composition is ... e., 12.12; e. spirit of the French Vaudeville, 12.210; He [Hazlitt] is ... e., 12.226; e. terseness of phraseology, 13.18; its [“Osceola Signing the Treaty”] conclusions e., 13.104; e.. talent, 13.188; e. paragraph on Southey’s political bias, 13.196; e. without being antithetical, 15.17; forcibly e., 15.166; e. spirit, 16.27; e. grace, 16.38.

EPIGRAMMATISM:  slight e., 9.294; pungent e., 10.183; brevity will degenerate into e., 11.107; of her [Mrs. Osgood’s] e., 13.24; a rich tint of that e., 13.116; e. of her [Mrs. Osgood’s] conclusions, 13.124; Brevity ... may degenerate into e., 13.152; tint of that e., 13.182; e. of her [Mrs. Osgood’s] conclusions, 13.191; degenerates into mere e., 14.268; e. in which she [Mrs. Osgood] excels, 15.100; independently of ... mere e., 15.101; remarkable for ... e., 15.197; no better cause than its e., 16.31; effect from e., 16.115.

EPIGRAMMATIST:  agree with the. e., 16.155.

EPIGRAMS:  innumerable e., 12.104; intentional e., 13.116; e. ... in designating by the dozen, 13.165; intentional e., 13.182; author of these e. must be, 13.183; e. outright, 16.6.

ESSAY:  this e. [on Dante], 8.164; e. on the acting of Kean, 8.321; author of this e., 8.321; e. in the Old Bachelor, 8.322; e. on American Social Elevation, 9.54; his [Dr. Haxall’s] e., 9.164; original portion of the e., 9.165; e. is embraced in a pamphlet, 9.166; an e. on the perfectibility of man, 9.269; e. now before us, 10.57; a good e., 10.189; diffuse e., 11.4; e. is a good thing, 11.4; criticism is not ... an e., 11.6; the e. free ... from every gross error, 11.101; an entertaining e., 11.101; finer field than the e., 11.102; e. on motives, 11.138; a didactic e., 11.254; original point of his e., 12.57; e. by Hawthorne, 13.145; of a legend or an e., 13.192; the e. in question, 13.193; His e. was first published, 14.20; e. we suppose to have been the original, 14.20; for Brewster’s pronouncing the e., 14.20; compendium of the e., 14.20; as the author of the e. himself shows, 14.21; periodical moral e., 14.48; e. on Bacon, 14.191; a very elaborate e., 14.233; a valuable e., 15.24; originality in ... e., 15.43; the e. ... nervous, forcible, thoughtful, 15.74; the e. [“Philip Van Artevelde”], 15.77; grave history or e., 15.85; purpose of ... an e., 15.104; our present e., 15.179; popular as his first e., 15.210; periodical moral e., 16.37; a John Waterish e., 16.95; the e. in question, 16.123; e. on the “Rationale of Verse,” 16.124; e. (which will soon appear), 16.124; shown in the e., 16.126N; an Etonian prize-e. re-vamped, 16.158.

ESSAYS:  the Oxford Prize e., 8.323; several short e., 9.141; the collection of e., 9.143; consisting of e. on various subjects, 9.143; e. which constitute, 9.144; ( ... generality of similar e.:), 9.164; e. ... we would not be hired to read, 10.145; e. as we see here, 10.157; fragments of ... e., 10.207; most [“Twice-Told Tales”] ... are e., 11.101; e. ... not so ... novel, 11.104; pure e., 11.104; e. just named, 11.105; e. of Hawthorne, 11.105; the e. before us, 11.106; agreeable e., 14.73; sundry e., 15.24; e. or sketches, 15.37; various e. thus signed, 15.59; e. have merit, 15.67; brief tales and e., 15.196; several e. and other works, 15.207; occasional e., 15.211; known through ... numerous ... e., 15.216; e. of the pedant’s pupils, 16.3; e. have ... paragraphical effect, 16.83; e. leave no doubt, 16.158; e. indeed, 16.158.

ESSAYIST:  a fine head of the e., 9.140; doctrines of the e., 10.157; strength of the e., 10.158; error into which the e. ... rushed, 10.159; son of the great e., 11.174; critic, or e., 11.229; rambling e., 12.238; left to the e., 13.112; the e. justly observes, 14.192; view him as an e., 15.11; a medical e., 15.25; entertaining e., 15.67; the e., on the very page, 15.68; more successful as an ... e., 15.220; as an e., 16.94; historian, moral philosopher, e., 16.156.

ESSAYIST’S:  great e. review of, 14.191.

ESSAYISTS:  best of the British e., 11.103.

EVENT:  pages which follow this e., 9.153; its leading e., 9.153; an e. so far from weakened, 9.153; reader is prepared for this e., 9.153; commingling with this e., 9.154; leading e. of the story, 10.35; some cursorily-sketched e., 10.121; variety of e., 10.201; The whole e. of the drama, 11.54; not an e., 15.29; e. on which hinges the main interest, 15.110.

EVENTS:  varied e. of the novel, 8.7; e. going forward upon the stage, 8.46; e. and incidents, 8.107; leading e. of the Revolution, 8.146; e. which are a portion of our chronicles, 8.147 scene of the ... e., 8.189; fidelity to all the main e., 8.224; knowledge of past e., 8.227N; detailing the e., 9.15; these varied e., 9.137; as changed by the e., 9.137; wild account of the e., 9.152; history ... fruitful in great e., 9.155; remarks upon public e., 9.177; train of e., 9.245; detailing e. at home, 9.256; most improbable e., 10.2; No e. could be more wonderful, 10.5; than the e. foretold, 10.5; e. of futurity, 10.10; At all e. 10.37; the main e., 10.119; the main e., 10.124; e. ... monstrously improbable, 10.201; e. ... in ... order of ... occurrence, 11.49; train of e., 11.54; record of e., 11.167; of these e., 11.167; narrative of fictitious e., 11.206; succession of e., 11.209; number or paucity of the e., 12.78; play abounds in e., 13.62; unoriginality of the e., 13.69; e. which evolve, 13.70; combination of e. with character, 13.112; combines such e., 13.153; combination of striking e., 14.194; real e., 15.119; by e. alone, 16.22; succession of e., 16.22; e. are our sole means, 16.22; e. are time, 16.22; the more numerous the e., 16.22; “the succession of e.,” 16.22; a balance between e., 16.33.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


FANCIES:  a tribe of f., 12.37; two prominent f., 13.81; f. which were the basis of his flame, 14.152; fully matured f., 14.195; the f. of the moment, 15.94; f. of the poet, 16.26; common f. rejuvenated, 16.58; similar f., 16.62; ( ... other people’s f.), 16.80; a class of f., 16.88; f. at random, 16.88; aware of these “f.,” 16.88; “f.” have ... ecstasy, 16.88; in these f., 16.89; the evanescence of f., 16.89; the f. in question, 16.90; f., or psychal impressions, 16.90.

FANCIFUL:  Moore is as f., 8.227; f. combinations, 8.258; found still only f., 10.62; never more than f., 10.63; f. conception, 10.65; persisted in terming f., 10.66; purely f. attributes, 10.155; drivelling effort to be f., 11.17; f. illustration, 11.199; will be found still f., 12.38; f. poet, 12.38; f. in “Lalla Rookh,” 12.38; would have been f. still, 12.38; essentially f., 12.38; talent for f. ... illustration, 13.26; more delicately f., 13.180; the really f., 14.160; will be found f. still 14.183; “a f. poet,” 14.183; He [Moore] is f., 14.183; to be still f., 14.183; f. embellishment, 14.233; that he [Moore] is f. only, 14.282; most singularly f. of modern poets, 14.283; carrying the f. to the very verge of the fantastic, 14.287; a ... f. ... essayist, 15.67; all very well, f., 15.70; nor so graceful, f., 15.90; musical and f. passages, 15.93; f. nature, 15.105; anything be more f., 15.124; hyper-f. character, 15.186; in an age so f., 16.41; ( ... a f. man ... ), 16.166; terrors ... f., 16.167.

FANCIFULLY:  f. imagined, 8.64.

FANCY:  the f. of poet, 8.70; absolutely radiant with f., 8.77; disordered f., 8.97; engraven upon our f., 8.104; brightest visions of our f., 8.222; the f. ... of Edward Lytton Bulwer, 8.223; chief constituent of f., 8.295; efforts of the f., 8.295; without f., 9.97; rigidly disciplined f., 10.50; essentially the poet of f., 10.61; f. as nearly creates, 10.61; distinction, of degree, between the f. and the imagination, 10.62; know to be f., 10.62; mere f., 10.63; just distinction between the f. and the imagination, 10.65; little of f., 10.66; appertain to the f. alone, 10.68; a vivid f., 10.70; f. ... wavers disagreeably between two ideas, 10.74; f. delights in, 10.126; for our f., 10.130; never tiring f., 10.147; for f. we might have looked, 10.176; f. exuberant and glowing, 10.195; wide fields of f., 10.222; more favourably than its f., 10.223; guide the f., 11.9; originality of f., 11.9; for the human f., 11.21; judge of ... f., 11.157; f. of the poetical, 11.167; quaint f., 11.200; excited f., 11.277; f. of Miss Barrett, 12.7; ethereal f., 12.16; It is f., 12.37; f. ... creates as the imagination, 12.37; distinction ... between the f. and the imagination 12.38; What we feel to be f., 12.38; fact seems to be that ... f., 12.38; result ... appertains to the f., 12.39; when either f. or Humor is expressed to gain an end, 12.40; brilliant f., 12.40; a f. possessed, 12.40; freak of our own f., 12.42; without f., 12.142; between the f. and the Fantasy, 12.216; f. and the Imagination, 12.216; between Fantasy and f., 12.217; vivid f., 12.217; warm f., 12.219; except, perhaps in f., 12.226; in f., 12.231; vivid f., 12.234; of the f., 12.235; f. and Fantasy as his [Hood’s] predominant features, 12.236; tertiary grade of f., 12.238; f. of conception, 12.260; refined and delicate f., 13.51; touches of delicate f., 13.104; children of her delicate f., 13.106; a vivid f., 13.114; f., as contradistinguished from imagination, 13.125; ever-active vigor of f., 13.143; “here is ... obvious f.,” 13.146; best appeals are made to the f., 13.148; feathers of f., 13.152; the f. which invents, 13.158; more remarkable than the f., 13.180; a vivid f., 13.180; imagination as distinguished from its subordinate, f., 13.188; f. and na├»veté appear, 13.191; to the delicate f., 13.224; her [Mrs. Lewis’] f. exuberant, 13.224; warm but inappropriate f., 14.101; economize f., 14.104; f. of our readers, 14.113; operation of pure f., 14.119; f. of the poet, 14.151; to please his own f., 14.157; What we feel to be f., 14.183; adopting the half-f., 14.205; f., on the lover’s part, 14.206; the f. of the gazer, 14.209; a f. to be thoroughly confounded, 14.217; neither mere accident nor mere f., 14.225; f. of a pedant, 14.241; my own f., 14.266; feathers of f., 14.269; while granting him [Moore] f., 14.282; the f. of this poet, 14.782; over the f. of all other men, 14.282; speaking of f., 14.283; identify ourselves, in f., 14.292; exuberant f., 15.12; encourages that f., 15.12; in f. that he reigns supreme, 15.13; f. used with ... little determinateness of meaning, 15.13N; f. as nearly creates as the imagination, 15.13N; imagination, f., fantasy and humour, 15.13N; appertains to the f., 15.14N; f. ... infringing upon, 15.14N; f. seeks incongruous or antagonistic elements, 15.14N; f. or humour, 15.14N; referable to f., 15.15; f. ... not inconsistent, 15.15; (that f. should have ... ), 15.15; f. of illustration, 15.52; vivacity of f., 15.69; the Cinderella f., 15.69; f. . apparent in everything, 15.87; a fine f., 15.92; richness of f., 15.98; less of f., 15.102; subordinate f., 15.102; disordered f., 15.111; excited ... f., 15.127; to the f.-exciting, 15.134; creature of Mr. Smith’s f., 15.200; a quick f., 15.256; a vivid f., 16.27; a merely prurient f., 16.36; excited f. triumphs, 16.56; He [author of “Cromwell”] has f., 16.66; the f. took root, 16.93; in pursuance of this f., 16.93; full of life and f., 16.94; the f. of this individual, 16.111; man have a f., 16.128; a vivid f., 16.144; distinctive features ... secondly, f., 16.144; an irrational f., 16.161; borderline between f. and Fantasy, 16.178; vivid f., 16.178.

FANTASY:  the f. is conveyed, 11.112; the province of f., 12.39; f. seeks not merely ... elements, 12.40; between the Fancy and the f., 12.216; f., the Fancy and the Imagination, 12.216; between f. and Fancy, 12.217; faculties ... rich in that which we have termed f. 12.222; Fancy and f. as his [Hood’s] predominant features, 12.236; imagination, fancy, f. and humour, 15.13N; fancy ... infringing upon ... f., 15.14N; between Fancy and f., 16.178. See also PHANTASY.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


GENIUS:  the impress of g., 8.43; the g. of its author, 8.71; a writer of infinite g., 8.75; the singular g., 8.100; the g. of Mrs. Sigourney, 8.127; undoubted and indubitable g., 8.156; evidences of her [Miss Sedgwick’s] g., 8.162; any particle of g., 8.170; men of g., 8.186; a man of g. and reflection, 8.201; Such [use of certain words] is g., 8.202; work of a man of g., 8.214; strong indications of a g., 8.215; sense of propriety ... inseparable from true g., 8.216; triumphs of g., 8.222; contemplation of his [Bulwer’s] g., 8.223; the g. of Niebuhr, 8.227; rare g., 8.229; g. should not ... cannot be bound down to ... commonplaces of existence, 8.231; no surer mark of g., 8.235; the author’s g., 8.235; the matured and vigorous g. of England, 8.298; a man of g., 9.110; a man of g., 9.123; comprehensiveness of his [Hazlitt’s] g., 9.145; the g. of the times, places, and people depicted, 9.155; To g. of any kind, 9.169; g. of the language, 10.18; evil g. of mere matter-of-fact, 10.30; high g., 10.37; men of g., 10.40; men of g., 10.40; ultimate destination of the song ... its essence — its g., 10.41; the g. of Aeschylus, 10.43; man of g., 10.58; poet of high g., 10.72; g. of the poet, 10.72; g. of the author, 10.85; errant g., 10.85; noblest order of g., 10.88; Perseverance ... one thing ... g. is another, 10.122; man of g., 10.132; g. of Arago, 10.136; graver g. of the Saxon, 10.138; nobler order of g., 10.143; that g. which gave it birth, 10.149; inspiration of g., 10.150; truest g., 10.150; created a g., 10.150; through g., 10.150; every man of g., 10.155; precocious g., 10.174; the g. ... evinced, 10.178; redolent of g., 10.190; criticisms on ... g., 10.195; g. of Miss Landon, 10.195; g. of Petrarch, 10.202; man of g., 10.208; man of g., 10.208; fatality ... so constantly attended g., 10.208; g. of the author of “Pelham,” 10.218; In her [Lucretia Maria Davidson’s] g., 10.222; “staunch American g., Mr. Paulding,” 11.2; man of g., 11.9; of indisputable g., 11.18; profundity of that g., 11.39; critical propositions reduced by g. into practice, 11.41; high g., 11.58; reverence for g., 11.63; no positive g., 11.64; ( ... keen “taste” of g. ...), 11.66; g. of Mr. Longfellow, 11.67; permitting his [Longfellow’s] g., 11.67; g. to get the better of ... conventional prejudice, 11.69; of the highest intellect and g., 11.87; done justice to his own [Dickens’] g., 11.89; wrong to ... g., 11.89; g. is a rare gift and divine, 11.89; spark of g., 11.89; dignity of g., 11.90; spirit of true g., 11.96; indisputable g., 11.104; highest g., 11.106; demands of high g., 11.107; every man of g., 11.109; Art subservient to g., 11.110; truest g., 11.113; estimate of ... g., 11.125; g. of the highest rank, 11.125; the spirit, or g., 11.143; unmistakeable g., 11.158; Mr. Patch was a g., 11.164; judgment and g., 11.177; stupendous g., 11.178; high g., 11.200; man of g., 11.206; the g. evinced in the composition, 11.206; the man of ... g., 11.221; man of g., 11.221; g. we defined, 11.221; Mr. Griswold’s g., 11.222; burning with g., 11.236; g. of its author [Tennyson], 11.236; g. and originality, 11.237; superiors in g., 11.241; g. of Shakspeare, 11.242; high poetical g., 11.249; Loftier g. than any [man], 11.249; high g., 11.250; highest g., 11.250; every man of g., 11.275; ( ... fine g.), 11.278; higher order of g., 11.278; admiration of her [Miss Barrett’s] g., 12.3; wild and magnificent g., 12.10; whirl of ... g., 12.14; g. ... too impetuous, 12.19; instinct of g., 12.32; neglected man of g., 12.59; neglected man of g., 12.59; g. in America, 12.108; indication of g., 12.147; man of g., 12.148; spirit of true g., 12.148; poetical g., 12.166; g. of Tennyson, 12.180; development of g., 12.185; spirit of g., 12.185; career of g. and of beauty, 12.186; g. of the play, 12.187; woman of g., 12.188; g. of Hood, 12.217; Hood’s g., 12.222; men of g., 12.226; Hood’s g., 12.233; g. of the author, 12.233; g. has been greatly misconceived, 12.233; fine g., 12.235; bold g., 12.237; g. of its author, 12.249; ( ... Frogpondian g.), 13.7; True g., 13.73; of g. in its author, 13.86; evidence of g., 13.95; gave indication ... of g., 13.95; g. would have been rendered immediately manifest, 13.95; g. of the poet, 13.108; noblest of all attributes of g., 13.120; men of g., 13.128; indispensable indications of g., 13.129; reconciling g. with artistic skill, 13.129; highest g. and the profoundest art, 13.130; never do to claim for Bryant a g. of the loftiest order, 13.130; to deny him [Bryant] g. in any respect, 13.130; Mr. Bryant has g., 13.130; a man of g., 13.135; evinces extraordinary g., 13.141; man of g., 13.142; perseverance is one thing and g. quite another, 13.150; exercise of the highest g., 13.151; g. ... most advantageously employed, 13.151; purposes of ambitious g., 13.152; hand of g., 13.176; to the aid of g., 13.195; to disparage g., 13.195; the highest g., 13.195; a man of g., 13.206; of mechanical g., 14.6; wonderful mechanical g., 14.21; man of g., 14.45; droll g., 14.87; judge ... must be a g., 14.103; appreciation of g., 14.163; displays of g., 14.176; that highest g., 14.176; g. which all men ... acknowledge, 14.176; g. which demonstrates itself, 14.176; g. which speaks without a voice, 14.176; factitious “g.”, 14.176; “g.” in the popular sense, 14.176; such “g.” fail, 14.177; pseudo-g. to which I refer, 14.177; true g., 14.177; the world calls “g.,” 14.177; works of ... g., 14.177; the true g., 14.178; g. is greater or less, 14.178; idea of g., 14.178; g. ... evinces a filial affection, 14.183; To g. Beauty gives life, 14.183; All men of g., 14.189; men of g., 14.189; to appreciate g., 14.189; at the root of g., 14.190; g. of the people, 14.261; the poetic g., 14.262; g. quite another, 14.268; men of g., 15.2; g. involves ... scorn of chicanery, 15.2; men of g., 15.3; men of g., 15.3; extraordinary g., 15.4; man of g., 15.8; indications ... of g., 15.9; absolute g., 15.12; g. as yet unrevealed, 15.30; the woman of g., 15.32; intuitive perceptions ... belong ... to g., 15.40; not exactly of g., 15.57; Miss Fuller’s g., 15.75; ( ... high g. she [Miss Fuller] ... possesses), 15.75; hand of g., 15.95; appreciation of g. in others, 15.105; keen appreciation of g., 15.107; decided g., 15.113; g. proper, 15.136; air noble of g., 15.136; indicative of g., 15.153; indicative of ... g., 15.182; better g. evinced, 15.184; g. unquestionably, 15.186; taste, without g., 15.187; Mr. Halleck’s hand ... indicative of his g., 15.189; high talent ... amounting to g., 15.190; g. cannot be doubted, 15.205; without being a g., 15.249; no man of g., 15.252; man of ... g., 15.254; men of g., 15.254; men of unquestionable g., 15.259; To high g., 15.261; man of g., 16.19; or of g., 16.19; man of g., 16.26; poetic g., 16.29; a man of g., 16.30; true g., 16.34; truest g., 16.43; dearth of g., 16.53; ( ... fine g.), 16.56; higher order of g., 16.57; Dickens ... higher g. than Bulwer, 16.61; men of g., 16.66; what we call g., 16.67; possess all the g., 16.67; “g.” itself, 16.67; “work of g.,” 16.67; quality and g., 16.67; “works of g.,” 16.67; men of g., 16.67; “work of g.,” 16.67; g. itself, 16.67; men of g., 16.78; g. ... poor in worldly goods, 16.78; Our g. ... repressed, 16.78; g. ... manifested ... in ... choice of the clay, 16.99; g. regards ... with respect, 16.100; regards g. with respect, 16.100; g. of the play, 16.110; indolence of g., 16.121; g. of the highest order, 16.121; prominent feature of g., 16.121; Give to g. a ... motive, 16.121; element of g., 16.121; the lot of g., 16.121; g. which is true, 16.121; incompatibility of g. with art, 16.122; the impress of his [Sallust’s] g., 16.122; some poor devil of a g., 16.123; the man of g., 16.123; glowing abandon of g., 16.126; Men of very high g., 16.126; partial g., 16.127; true g., 16.127; the song proper ... its g., 16.136; the g. of Aeschylus, 16.138; g. ... must inevitably succumb, 16.148; that which is instinctive with g., 16.148; men of indisputable g., 16.152; agrees better with mere Talent than with g., 16.152; indolent men of g., 16.158; g. it is not, 16.158; poet without g., 16.159; a man of g., 16.160; a man of g., 16.163; the highest g., 16.163; point of g., 16.164; men of g., 16.175; men of g., 16.175; with g., 16.177; peculiar g., 16.178.

GENIUSES:  small g., 11.39; versatile g., 14.176; on account of being g., 14.256.

GROTESQUE:  bordering on the g., 8.132; for a subserviency so g., 8.276; overwhelmed with the g., 8.299; bathetic and g., 8.306; g. speculations, 9.67; g. music, 9.69; g. in rhythm, 9.94; g. acts, 10.151; so g. an air, 10.163; aloof from the g., 12.219.

GROTESQUELY:  g. out of place, 11.138.

GROTESQUENESS:  g. ... adjuncts to Ideality, 9.94; source of g., 9.96.

GROTESQUERIE:  richest g., 12.216; brilliant g., 12.216; effect arises from that g., 12.234; richest g., 16.178; glowing g., 16.178.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


HUMOUR: a mind overflowing with ... h., 8.76; wit. especially, and its [Cherubina’s] h., 8.80; neither wit nor h., 8.151; broad h., 8.223; the h., the energy, 8.223; of the truest h., 8.257; in joint h. and verisimilitude, 8.260; of the truest h., 8.261; sly h., 8.264; h. is very fine, 8.315; the same hidden h., 8.320; true h., 9.17; full of h., 9.19; vivacious h., 9.21; broad h., 9.47; h. of the Doctor, 9.69; fine h., 9.83; a rich vein of h., 9.98; the writer’s h., 9.139; true h., 10.39; In pathos, h., 10.132; Attempts at h., 10.206; h. ... antagonistical to that which is the soul of the Muse, 11.24; h. and that quality, 11.24; individual branch of h., 11.24; remarkable h., 11.60; interest and h., 11.134; portraiture abounds in h., 11.213; Fantasy, and h., 12.38; in recognizing h., 12.40; when Fancy or h. is expressed to gain an end, 12.40; compensating incongruousness ... or h., 12.118; ethereal class of h., 12.216; such words as Wit, h., 12.216; domains of h., 12.217; new generous “h.,” 13.50; the most delicate h., 13.155; imagination, fancy, fantasy, and h., 15.13N; laugh outright in recognising h., 15.14N; either fancy or h., 15.14N; also some h., 15.21; the merit of h., 15.23; perpetual good h. with all things, 15.60; racy h., 15.84; truth and h., 15.86; species of wit, approximating h., 15.86; h. of the moment, 16.3; perfect good h., 16.39; ethereal h., 16.178.

HUMOURED:  good-h. outpouring of ... merriment, 13.168.

HUMOURIST:  (a practical h.), 8.261.

HUMOURISTS:  Solidists, h., and advocates, 9.166.

HUMOUROUS:  h., and very clever book, 8.265; the merely h. pieces, 11.23; h. verse, 11.24; in all h. painting, 11.62; h. pieces, 11.76; to confound h. verse with poetry, 11.76; ( ... the sarcastic, or the h.), 11.109; pieces entitled “h.,” 11.167; not so much h. in itself, 12.218; productive of the usual h. effect, 12.218; variety of h. or pathetic observation, 13.76; sarcastic, but seldom h., 15.183; best of the h. poets, 15.256.

HUMOUROUSLY:  h. sketched, 9.20.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


Notes:

None.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞

[S:1 - PCV, 1966] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - An Index of Poe's Critical Vocabulary (Dameron and Stagg) (Index to Criticism, A-H)