Text: J. L. Dameron and L. C Stagg, “Index to Criticism, P-Z,” An Index of Poe’s Critical Vocabulary in Poe’s Collected Works, (1966), pp. 37-50 (This material is protected by copyright)


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CRITICISM [[P-Z]]

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PASSION:  a reciprocal p., 8.57; drama of ... p., 8.73; rich with ... p., 8.74; the very soul of p. and imagination, 8.75; disenthralment from p., 8.97; chivalries of p., 8.124; methods of evincing ... p., 8.188; a more forcible tale of p., 8.223; uniting in one person ... the p., 8.223; highest stage of action or p., 8.225; delineations of p., 8.226; what a p. the Count is in, 9.111; in an absolute p., 9.190; in a growing p., 10.34; indicative of vehement p., 10.93; drama of action and p., 10.123; no part in the p., 10.149; a p. to be satiated, 11.72; unguided p., 11.87; Not so with terror, or p., 11.109; on fire with p., 11.165; expression of p., 11.232; poetry and p. are discordant, 11.255; intense p., 11.255; exalts the soul not into p., 11.255; earthly p., 11.255; impulses of p., 11.255; reject p. from the true, 11.256; if we reject even p., 11.256; principles of ... p., 11.261; the p. of Mrs. Norton, 11.275; p. is prosaic, 11.277; tone of p., 11.277; poetry and p. are discordant, 11.278; ghastly p., 12.15; fiercest P., 12.16; Mr. Dinneford ... in a p., 12.137; depicting of p., 12.191; poetic p., 12.202; madness of his p., 12.211; absurd p. for the lower species, 13.27; discovered his p., 13.40; poetry of p., 13.110; the p. of poetry, 13.110; great tragic element, p., 13.113; not singing the p. of love, 13.131; p. proper and poesy are discordant, 13.131; p. in its connexion with poetry, 13.134; intense p. of grief, 13.134; pulses of the heart’s p., 13.146; p., enthusiasm, and abandon, 13.156; tale of romantic p., 13.157; perceive ... the same p., 13.162; in such a p., 13.167; put him [Lowell] in such a p., 13.169; in such a p., 13.171; blending of the poetry of p., 13.177; the p. of poetry, 13.177; great tragic element, p., 13.179; even p., 13.188; tale of p., 13.217; a tale ... of p., 13.219; the same p., 13.221; full of p., 13.225; p. for Mary Chaworth, 14.150; p. ... of the most thoroughly romantic, 14.151; ( ... p. ... can be properly termed), 14.151; of a p. thus engendered, 14.151; whatever of soul-p., 14.151; unless we have ... p., 14.178; when we speak of ... “p.,” 14.178; so much of the fiercest p., 14.182; p., or the excitement of the heart, 14.198; p. [demands] a homeliness, 14.198; p ... may not be introduced, 14.198; p., which is the excitement of the heart, 14.275; the incitements of p., 14.276; divine p. of love, 14.282; independent of that p., 14.290; in regard to p., 14.290; a p. for being mysterious, 15.23; scenes of p. ... intensely wrought, 15.46; so great a p., 15.48; love of solitude ... a p., 15.55; “universal p.,” 15.85; more ... p., 15.102; a disenthralment from p., 15.111; ideality is not so manifest as ... p., 15.117; p. is ... subdued, 15.117; Mere p., 15.117; triumph over p., 15.117; more p., 15.119; in a great p., 15.164; exquisite sensibility and p., 15.184; particulars of p., 16.34; p. of Mrs. Norton, 15.54; True p., 16.56; tone of p., 16.56; poetry and p., 16.56; subdued p., 16.144.

PASSIONATE:  a p. devotion to its interests [music], 8.234; vigor of p. thought and expression, 8.304; p. purity, 10.195; effect ... purely p., 11.255 ; p. poems of Byron, 11.255; among the class p., 11.277; p. poem, 11.277; among the class p., 11.277; an instance of a p. one [poem], 11.278; not p., 11.278; p. grief, 12.146; more p. admiration, 12.146; p. love, 12.190; unaffectedly p., 12.191; p. heart, 12.191; most p., 12.192; p. ... man 12.202; p. expression, 13.114; p. sadness, 13.121; p. tenderness, 13.125; p. earnestness, 13.158; most p. of sentiments, 13.160; p. expression, 13.176; most p. of sentiments, 13.218; It [“The Broken Heart”] is ... more p., 13.224; richly imaginative and p., 13.225; (the truly p. ...), 14.198; in more p., human hearts, 14.282; unaffectedly p., 15.30; p. heart, 15.31; p. expression, 15.95; skillful and p., 15.184; p. sensibility, 15.210; most p. of fictions, 16.34; among the class p., 16.56; a p. poem, 16.56; the class p., 16.56; a p. one, 16.56; not p., 16.56.

PASSIONATELY:  dwelt upon ... so p., 10.36; p. at heart, 14.202; so p., 16.49; p. weeping bride, 16.51.

PASSIONS:  p. of mankind, 8.283; human p. wildly affected, 9.154; p. the sternest of our nature, 9.154; quick apprehensions and p., 10.58; appealed to the p. of a populace, 10.59; man of “p.,” 10.132; diseased by p. nearly ferocious, 11.99; profound p., 12.188; profound p., 12.191; “the gentler p.,” 13.131; far inferior to ... that of the p., 13.168; profound p., 15.30; p. ... made him what he is, 16.158.

PHANTASY:  p. pieces, 10.39; such p.-pieces as the “Lady of Shalott,” 16.28.See also FANTASY.

PICTURESQUE:  lovers of the ... p., 8.11; striking and p. legends, 8.91; p. handling, 8.95; eye then for the p., 8.216; p. effect, 8.260; p. ... description, 9.4; p. oddity of the scene, 9.9; so unusually p., 11.35; highly p. effect, 11.177; p. imagination, 11.267; naive and p., 13.100; dramatically p., 13.112; p. combination of incident, 13.154; p. low-life, 15.21; quick appreciation of the p., 15.57; always forcible ... p., 15.78; p. description, 15.84; incidents ... singular and p., 15.86; p. and more poetical value, 15.92; incidents interwoven are p., 15.120; love for the graceful rather than for the p., 15.150; due sense of the p., 15.154; prevailing character ... p., 15.155; in regard to the p., 15.155; no little of the p., 15.156; thoroughly p., 15.158; decidedly p., 15.158; somewhat heavy, and p., 15.160; too uniform to be p., 15.163; more of the p., 15.165; less of the p., 15.158; degree of the p., 15.173; sense of the p., 15.185; p. still-life pieces, 15.185; speak ... of the p., 15.185; the p. ... equally deficient, 15.189; little of the p., 15.189; less of the p., 15.193; little of the p., 15.196; neat and p., 15.197; much of the p., 15.199; too uniform to be p., 15.201; less of the p., 15.206; rather graceful than p., 15.221; clear, bold, decided and p., 15.223; forcible or p., 15.226; clear, weighty, and p., 15.235; distinct, and p., 15.249; a converse of the p., 15.250; forcible, p. and legible, 15.253; p. quaintness, 15.256; keen sense ... of the p., 15.257; p. error, 16.42; p. vigor, 16.136.

PICTURESQUENESS:  racy p., 9.157; vivid p., 11.268; p. of ... passages, 11.272; abound in p., 11.273; vivid p., 12.10; p. and finish, 15.166; deficient in ... p., 15.190; great ... p., 15.196; force and p., 15.213; without p., 15.224; boldness, strength, and p., 15.250; p. of the numerous pencil-scratches, 16.3.

PLAGIARISED:  one is p. from the other, 12.79; it [thought] has been ... p., 13.181.

PLAGIARISING:  charge him with p., 12.61; the p. poet, 16.77; accuse ... of p., 16.109.

PLAGIARISM:  a p. entire, 8.140; The most unfortunate charge ... p., 8.187; the most laughable piece of p. on record, 8.196; p. is still more laughable, 8.197; of incongruous folly, p., 8.205; p. from the work of Bishop Newton, 10.11N; charges of p., 10.12N; p. ... too palpable to be mistaken, 10.80; barefaced p., 10.191; A second p., 10.200; resembles p., 11.112; topic of p., 12.44; no p. is chargeable, 12.44; p. is committed, 12.54; exposure of p., 12.54; of p. generally, 12.54; guilty of p., 12.55; as p. exists, 12.56; that p. cannot exist, 12.56; p. in itself, 12.56; charge of p., 12.57; no such thing as p., 12.57; “glaring improbability” of the p., 12.59; he perpetrates the p., 12.60; accuse his friend ... of a p., 12.61; committed a p., 12.63; committed a p., 12.63; p. ... can be committed, 12.63; p. in the case in question, 12.65; impossibility of p., 12.65; innocent of the p., 12.65; “ ... charge of p ... ,” 12.67; deny the p. abstractly, 12.79; gross a p., 12.95; continuous p., 12.103; accusations of p., 12.104; a charge of p., 12.105; rebutting of a charge of p., 12.105; no such thing as p., 12.105; gross inconsistency of p., 12.105; charged with p., 12.106; palpable p., 12.190; If this is not a p., 12.233; similarity cannot ... amount to p., 13.71; charge of wholesale p., 13.214; a palpable p., 14.47; cry of p., 15.35; direct charge of p., 15.35; chargeable with p., 15.62; the charge of p., 15.62; a p. ... distinctly proved, 15.62; charged with p., 15.63; downright p., 15.65; unnecessary p., 16.52; poet who commits a p., 16.77; p. in the first degree, 16.96; not demonstrably p., 16.96; charge of p., 16.102; a p. from Channing, 16.132; the p. appeared in a foreign country, 16.132; unjustly accused of p., 16.134; deliberate p., 16.134; Is this p., 16.144.

PLAGIARISM’S:  the risk of p. detection, 12.54.

PLAGIARISMS:  call them p., 12.86; frequent and palpable p., 12.106; grossest p., 12.156; palpable p., 15.62; most frequent and palpable p., 15.63; p. of this character, 16.77; Apparent p., 16.133.

PLAGIARIST:  error is adopted by the p., 8.204; learning of the p., 10.217; a consummate p., 11.13; p. has not merely committed a wrong in itself, 12.55; not sympathy for the p., 12.55; the p. is either a man of no note or ... of note, 12.59; p. ... has ... ground, 12.60; who is the p., 12.79; he who shall copy verbatim ... no p., 15.35; less ... p. than ... quack, 15.36; the p. ... fallen upon the idea, 16.134; who the p., 16.135.

PLAGIARISTS:  one of the most scoundrelly p. in Christendom, 8.204; what all the p., 12.56; “acquaintances” of the p., 12.56; class of wilful p., 12.57; “ ... willful p. ... ,” 16.132.

PLOT:  p. of Norman Leslie, 8.52; Here’s p. ... 8.56; principal characters in the p., 8.57; p. ... a monstrous piece of absurdity, 8.60; p. is briefly as follows, 8.77; no pretensions to a connected p., 8.95; p. of Clinton Bradshaw, 8.110; p. will be readily conceived, 8.120; In p., 8.141; little p., 8.146; the basis of the p., 8.225; discovered in the p., 8.301; p. of Elkswatawa, 9.116; the p. and the adventures, 9.126; p. of ... is simple, 9.146; p. of “Philothea,” 9.154; narrative of a p., 9.183; idea of the p., 9.185; p. is miserably inconsequential, 10.28; without injury to the p., 10.28; has no p., 10.50; (for p. it has none), 10.60; the p. of “Night and Morning,” 10.116; groundwork of the p., 10.116; p. ... conveys but an indefinite meaning, 10.116; will not result in p., 10.117; p. a good one, in which none of the leading incidents, 10.117; p. of “Night and Morning” ... one of the best, 10.117; perfection of p., 10.119; the word p., 10.120; p. as near perfection as possible, 10.120; the interest of p., 10.120; perfection of p., 10.124; elsewhere in p., 10.127; p. is the best, 10.149; p. can only please, 10.198; of p. ... none at all, 10.198; where no p. is to be cared for, 10.200; no attempt at p., 10.211; p. is ... improbable, 10.215; p. and conduct, 11.17; p. of “Barnaby Rudge,” 11.42; author ... cognizant of his p., 11.50; conceal the secret of the p., 11.51; essentials of the p., 11.53; any particular 11.54; the soul the p., 11.57; p. is exceedingly meagre, 11.90; about this p., 11.91; general p. or narrative, 11.92; The p., 11.195; if p. it can be called, 11.195; that p. is none, 11.195; no reference to p., 11.205; as for p., 11.209; p. ... an artificial effect, 11.209; absence of p., 11.210; part and parcel of its p., 12.8; p. of the drama, 12.8; surpasses in p., 12.16; p. of “Fashion,” 12.112; p. such as this, 12.116; simplicity in p., 12.119; As the p. runs, 12.186; means of a p., 13.40; in relation to the p., 13.44; “abound in p.,” 13.44; incidents ... will no more constitute a p., 13.44; p., properly understood, 13.44; consider a p., 13.45; construction of p., 13.46; perfection of p., 13.46; p. of God, 13.46; unity resulting from p., 13.46; p. ... an adjunct to the drama, 13.46; dramas ... with very little p., 13.47; plays of high merit, having p., 13.47; without effect upon the p. itself, 13.47; no portion in the p., 13.47; misconception of the nature ... of p., 13.48; chief unraveller of the p., 13.49; in the light of its [Tortesa”] p., 13.51; p. runs thus, 13.61; p. ... , looks better in our naked digest, 13.62; conceptions of the nature of p., 13.69; its [“The Spanish Student”’s] p., 13.73; is no p., 13.73; rambling p., 13.168; (if p. it can be called), 13.168; p. or conduct of this Fable, 13.171; in construction, or p., 13.176; differs in p., 13.219; p. forms a portion of the contemplated interest, 14.188; p. is very imperfectly understood, 14.188; a sufficiently good p., 14.188; fail signally in p., 14.188; best constructors of p., 14.189; instance of admirably managed p., 14.189; sacrifices to mere p., 14.189; every p., worth the name, 14.193; give a p. its indispensable air, 14.193; p. ... a tissue of absurdities, 15.17; simplicity of p., 15.29; p. ... estimable for simplicity, 15.29; (that is to say, p.,), 15.95; to p. it has little pretension, 15.109; construction of p., 16.10; perfection of p., 16.10; p. of God, 16.10; p. which ... has no adaptation, 16.44; as the p. runs, 16.110; Defective p., 16.171.

PLOTS:  p. ... neither adapted nor intended for scrutiny, 10.198; adhere to the old p., 13.36; p. of God, 13.46; p. ... not so good as ... individual items, 15.57; p. of God, 16.10.

PLOTTING:  allusion to some real p., 11.56.

POESY, [SENTIMENT OF]:  describing p., the Sentiment, 8.281; sentiment of p., 8.282; p. is the sentiment, 8.283.

POETIC SENTIMENT:  of this p., 8.284; if we consider the p., 8.284; ( ... exciting the p.), 8.284; soul of the p., 8.293; least degree the p., 8.295; imbued with the p., 8.296; at war with the p., 8.296; the means of the p., 8.302; produce ... p., 8.302; prompted by the p., 8.303; by the p. alone, 8.303; even the proper p., 9.94; to infuse the p., 9.95; soul of the p., 11.17; demands of the p., 11.107; fail to satisfy the p., 11.107; principles of the p., 11.148; true p., 11.247; yielded his [Mr. Horne’s] own p., 11.254; p. ... implies, 12.105; direct ratio of the p., 12.106; proper p., 12.139; infuse the p., 12.140; p. ... may develope itself in various modes, 14.274; when inspired by the p., 14.274; which we recognise as the p., 14.275; p. presupposes a keen appreciation of the beautiful, 15.62; direct ratio of the p., 15.63; brimful of the p., 15.79; p. implies ... keen appreciation of poetic excellence, 16.77; p. (in distinction from the poetic power), 16.97; necessary ... to have p., 16.101.

POETIC SENTIMENTS:  exciting the p. in others, 8.284.

POETICAL SENTIMENT:  sufficient test of the p., 9.304; development of the p., 11.75; recognised as the p., 12.148.

PUFF:  For the sake of everything p., 8.51; both a p. and a publisher, 8.205; not to p. him [Dr. Holmes], 11.237; No p. no privilege, 12.138.

PUFFABLE:  For the sake of everything, ... p., 8.51.

PUFFED:  “Paul Ulric” p., 8.200; So continuously have we p., 10.192; be-p. into Demi-Deism, 11.18.

PUFFER:  of p. Hopkins, 11.238.

PUFFERY:  aid of foreign opinion and p., 8.94; system of p., 10.186; spirit of p., 10.190; mere p., 12.1.

PUFFING:  For the sake of everything ... p., 8.51; by indiscriminate p., 8.211; charge of indiscriminate p., 8.277N; come to think p. the duty, 10.192; pounded up into p.-paste, 12.8.

PUFFS:  critic p. himself, 11.224; occasional p., 14.161.


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QUAINT:  q. in phraseology, 9.94; occasionally q. phrases, 10.153; sweet and q. simplicity, 11.114; Mr. Tennyson is q. only 11.176 some have imagined him [Tennyson], q., 11.177; q. fancy of the thought, 11.200; q. in phraseology, 12.6; obscure, original, or q., 12.33; q. in phraseology, 12.139; limits of the q., 12.195; q. and stilted tone, 13.70; q. grace of expression, 13.133; q. sentence, 14.55; limits of the q., 15.37; q. ... grace, 16.38.

QUAINTNESS:  q. of expression, 8.309; q. ... adjuncts to Ideality, 9.94; q. in manner, 9.95; uneasy and meretricious q., 11.105; allude to his [Tennyson’s] q., 11.176; occasional q., 11.176; q. ... auxiliary to a poem, 11.177; mere q., 12.20; His [Shelley’s] q., 12.33; obscurity, q., exaggeration, 12.33; the q. in question, 12.69; q. ... a very powerful adjunct to ideality, 12.139; delight ... traced to ... q., 12.140; q. ... defended as a legitimate effect, 12.195; the tricks of ... q., 13.161; q. judiciously introduced, 14.180; “ ... q. of Tennyson,” 14.181; q. aimed at, 15.37; q. ... an admissible and important adjunct to ideality, 15.71; picturesque q., 15.256; q. arose from intuitive perception, 16.149; q. and exaggeration, 16.150; q. within reasonable limits, 16.159.

QUAINTNESSES:  those q., 12.21; the tricks of phraseology — q., 13.221; q., in a word, 16.159.


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RATIOCINATION:  tales of r., 11.109; the species of r., 12.105; r. actually passing through the mind, 14.149; a species of r., 14.257.

RATIOCINATIVE:  modes ... (the r., for example ... ), 11.109.

ROMANCE:  very fine r. Calavar, 8.65; disordered from r. reading, 8.77; episode of the purest r., 8.104; personages of pure r., 8.224; the constituent parts of a r., 8.224; in the light of r., 8.226; the pages of r., 8.226; in the guise of r., 8.231; prose r., 8.304; the richest r., 9.55; glowing vigor of r., 9.75; nor endurable r., 9.168; historical r., 9.169; spirit of r., 9.196; atmosphere of r., 9.197; spirit of r., 9.248; design of the r., 10.37; finest r. in existence, 10.37; the most of pure r., 10.50; utterance of the r. in “Otello,” 10.93; till r.-writing, 10.125; content to swallow his r., 10.131; style in r. writing, 10.196; wonderful that this r., 10.217; a r. or a melodrama, 11.6; r. of Scott, 12.190; Italian r., 12.223; best r. of its language, 12.224; emblematical r. of homely life, 13.73; wild r., 13.217; “The Child of the Sea” is a long r., 13.225; for the mere r., 14.151; essentiality of r., 14.152; the r. of ‘Anastasia,’ 15.45; r.-writers, in general, 16.170.

ROMANCERS:  of the silliest r., 9.

ROMANCES:  prose r., 10.65; r. ... so long fashionable, 10.122; long r., 10.122; long r. ... written before, 10.122; Italian prose r., 12.223.

ROMANTIC:  “situations” of “Elfrida” are ... ultra-r., 13.178.

ROMANTICIST:  fairest field to the r., 10.37.

ROMANTICO-:  r.-histories, 16.66.


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SATIRE:  most malignant s., 8.42; a s. levelled against the extravagances, 8.171; what we suppose to be s., 8.185; the arrows of his s., 8.219; s. ... a welcome novelty, 10.182; genuine s., 10.182; subjects for s., 10.182; aggrieved by the s., 10.183; general conduct of the s., 10.183; asserting that this s., 10.184; This s. has many faults, 10.193; general s., 10.193; s. of Byron, 10.194; incapacity for s., 10.214; bitter s., 11.133; nature and s., 12.27; s. of the “all,” 12.43; prose s., 12.107; subjects for s., 12.107; intended either for s. or burlesque, 12.107; refused to encourage s., 12.108; what s. we have, 12.108; task of composing a s., 12.109; “legitimate” s., 12.109; when the s. was printed, 13.131; s. is ... no poem, 13.132; accomplished in the way of s., 13.165; can be fairly called “s.,” 13.165; direct and obvious s., 13.166; In England ... s. abounds, 13.166; s. is unknown, 13.166; self-s. ... odious to the mass, 13.166; to sympathize with the s., 13.166; refused to encourage s., 13.166; s. ... so imperatively demands, 13.167; as subjects for s., 13.167; element of all s., 13.167; s. alone is worth talking about, 13.168; avenged his [Byron’s] wrongs in a s., 13.169; s. with a parallel title, 13.169; the s. sustains us, 13.169; no means a s. throughout, 13.171; this literary s., 13.171N; avoided this rhythm in s., 13.174; medley of fact, fiction, s., 15.44; s. ( ... published in exquisite style ...), 15.47; the s. ... bitter, 15.47; the best s., 15.47; best American s., 15.47; the only s. by an American, 15.47; “The Vision” ... our best s., 15.47; objects of ... s., 15.48; additional canto of the s., 15.48; broad s., 15.198.

SATIRES:  the greater number of s., 11.76; publication of several pointed s., 11.191; features of these s., 11.191; ( ... in all the more classical s.), 13.167; his [Fitz-Greene Halleck’s] s., 15.51.

SATIRIC:  s. model, 10.183; left arm of the s. Muse, 13.168; prose, with s. verse, 13.168; all the true s. effect, 13.170; quintessence of the s. spirit, 13.174.

SATIRICAL:  a s. poem, 8.171; termed s., 11.168; s. abilities done into verse, 12.107; suitable field for s. display, 12.107; s. and rhythmical power, 13.132; suitable field for s. display, 13.166; in respect to the s. essence, 13.169; bulky s. poem, 15.47; s. papers, 15.93; s. tale, 15.249.

SATIRICALLY:  (s.?) called classical taste, 10.142; which are (s.?), 11.168.

SATIRIST:  to the s., 13.167; produced by the s., 13.170; “common sense” of our s., 13.173.

SATIRISTS:  no s. ourselves [Americans], 10.182; used by these s., 10.184; scarcely so much s., 12.107; we are no s., 13.167.

SATIRIZE:  affects to s., 12.158; we s. only ourselves, 13.166.

SATIRIZED:  from the s., 13.167; writers ... s. accordingly, 13.172.

SATIRIZING:  s. of fashion, 12.124; in s. the people, 13.166.

SIMPLICITY:  s. of diction, 8.4; unpretending s., 8.9; by s. we imply, 8.9; s. here was the most reasonable, 8.105; perfect s., 8.138; mingled s. and enthusiasm, 8.165; tender sentiment and s., 8.316; striking s., 9.14; s. and accuracy, 9.49; has much ... s., 9.74; specimens of the singular s., 9.82; straight-forward s., 9.95; s. and perfect obviousness, 9.268; chief merit is s., 9.281; s. of expression, 9.291; s. of expression, 9.299; A rich s., 9.302; s. of design and execution, 9.302; rigorous s., 10.38; (whose majestic s. ...), 10.76; A graceful s., 10.89; s. both of design and execution, 10.89; the s. and warm-heartedness, 10.90; beauty of s., 10.127; all ornament save ... s., 10.157; the merit of s., 11.23; meaning seems s. itself, 11.82; quaint s., 11.114; s., perspicuity and vigor, 11.142; s. of these stanzas, 11.202; a horror sublime in its s., 12.16; s. in plot, 12.119; supremely artistic s., 12.131; s. is ... effective feature, 12.131; not the s. ... in the Greek drama, 12.132; s. of the Greek sculpture, 12.132; art in itself is s., 12.132; but evidence of the s., 12.140; s. is exquisite, 12.169; excess of s., 12.224; rigorous s., 12.236; truthful s., 12.260; rich s., 13.22; plain to the extreme of s., 13.140; most rigorous s., 13.160; general character of s., 13.160; most rigorous s. at all points, 13.218; general character of s., 13.218; the s. of the means, 14.28; possesses both s. and dignity, 14.60; more than accuracy and s. 14.96; ( ... s. of its [a true genius] works ...), 14.178; mode is that of s., 14.251; s. of demeanour, 15.7; s. of Smollett, 15.21; respect for ... s., 15.24; s. of plot, 15.29; plot ... estimable for s., 15.29; s. ... of sentiment, 15.54; his [Duyckinck’s] s., 15.60; s. and genuine earnestness, 15.102; utter s., 15.157; of s. and precision, 15.182; endeavors at s., 15.192; rigid s. and proportion, 15.192; MS. ... has much s., 15.200; unpretending strength and s., 15.252; rigor of ... s., 16.50; artistic s., 16.119; s. important ... in all true art, 16.119; the s. ... in Greek drama, 16.119; art in itself is s. in itself, 16.120.

STYLE:  Mr. Kennedy’s s., 8.9; s. of writing, 8.9; s. of Mr. K., 8.9; a s. simple and forcible, 8.9; subject of s., 8.9; Mr. Fay’s s., 8.60; to denominate its [“The Hawks of Hawk-Hollow’s”] s., 8.71; the s. of the novel, 8.72; may be called its s., 8.72; which s. is not, 8.72; s. properly so-called, 8.72; originality of manner, or of s., 8.73; beauty of s., 8.91; s. ... highly artificial, 8.93; purity of s., 8.95; generally excellent s., 8.98; Mr. Mattson’s s., 8.202; ( ... a s. necessarily similar), 8.209; Mr. Slidell’s mechanical s., 8.219; in spite of its [“The American in England”’s], 8.222; in s., 8.223; in the s. of the Kunstromanen, 8.231; s. of Mr. Wilmer, 8.236; idea of its [Bubbles From the Brunnens of Nassau’s] s., 8.320; peculiar s., 8.320; constrained character of the s., 9.2; much fault with the s., 9.9; the s. of Mr. Paulding’s Washington, 9.15; happy s., 9.16; to mistake for s., 9.16; In s., 9.36; witty-pedantic s., 9.36; s. is concise, 9.49; discrepancies of s., 9.68; cannot vary his s., 9.68; s. is somewhat over-abundant, 9.78; general s. of Mr. French, 9.125; s. of the Prince de Canino, 9.156; jejune s., 9.159; s. ... very minute and prosy, 9.177; the s. of George Balcombe, 9.262; beautiful s., 9.267; finish of s., 9.305; polish of the s., 10.48; s. of our novelist, 10.54; no poetical s., 10.69; a distinct s., 10.69; a polished s., 10.90; defects of s., 10.126; the idea of mere language with that of s., 10.126; chief constituent of a good s., 10.126; important object in s., 10.127; in s., 10.127; niaiseries of ... s., 10.129; in point of s., 10.130; s. is ... epigrammatic, 10.141; a vigorous s.,10.147; beauty of s., 10.157; Macaulay’s s., 10.157; s. of the profound thinker, 10.158; s. in romance writing, 10.196; simplicity of s., 10.201; slovenliness of s., 10.205; His [Bulwer’s] s., 10.212; turgid pretension of the s., 10.216; bombast of s., 10.218; the mechanical s., 11.8; s. of “Cyril Thornton,” 11.14; fluent and simple s. of narration, 11.64; s. ... is unusually bad, 11.101; s. of Review-making, 11.101; s. of Mr. Hawthorne, 11.103; s. is purity itself, 11.113; s. commensurate with its literary worth, 11.124; beauty of s., 11.142; force of s., 11.157; in the s., 11.172; faults of ... s., 11.215; particulars of s., 11.215; disfigure the s., 11.220; Boz’s s., 11.238; criticisms on s., 11.239; (so far as s. is concerned), 11.280; chaste, vigorous and comprehensive s., 12.27; prose s., 12.36; if any s., 12.36; preserves the s., 12.37; s. of Mr. Willis, 12.37; topic of his [Willis’] s., 12.37; prose s. of Mr. Willis, 12.40; imitations of s., 12.87; natural s., 12.134; s. ... of luxurious elegance, 12.135; s. of Hunt, 12.238; mere s., 12.245; s. of a period so remote as that of Milton, 12.245; any s. can be justly commended, 12.245; a gorgeous magnificence of s., 12.245; inaccuracies of s., 12.248; Mr. Ingersoll’s s., 12.253; s. ... is peculiarly the author’s own, 13.76; purity of its [“The Sinless Child”] s., 13.79; discipline in the minor merits of s., 13.85; the more prosaic a poetical s. is, 13.103; customary neat s., 13.127; accuracies and elegancies of s., 13.129; in a simple s., 13.140; natural s., 13.147; has the purest s., 13.155 abandonnement of her [Mrs. Osgood’s] s., 13.175; s. of Macaulay’s critical papers, 13.195; s. of Emerson, 13.195; s. of Miss Fuller, 13.195; (in point of s.), 13.196; ordinary kind of s., 13.206; in exquisite s., 13.219; fluent abandon of s., 13.226; to s. M’Pherson’ Ossian, 14.54; to a s. which dazzles, 14.74; “ ... stately but artificial s.,” 14.92; of the s. of Gibbon, 14.93; distinct s. of handwriting, 14.157; species of improvement in s., 14.157; improvement of s., 14.158; “ ... s. of Macaulay,” 14.180; precision of s., 14.215; This “ease” ... in a literary s., 14.277; His [N. P. Willis’] s. proper, 15.17; s. ... pure and sparkling, 15.19; s. ... vigorous, precise, 15.24; in point of s., 15.58; verbal s., 15.34; exquisite s., 15.47; s. ... lacks real power, 15.57; in good s., 15.58; s. ... remarkable, 15.59; s. ... quite remarkable, 15.61; s. that is “too perfect,” 15.67; (declamatory) s., 15.77; prose s., 15.77; s. of Miss Fuller, 15.79; no s. surpasses it [Miss Fuller’s], 15.79; everything that a s. need be,15.79; freshness of s., 15.86; mere s. [of Caroline M. Kirkland], 15.87; s. is pure, earnest, 15.90; warm abandonnement of ... s., 15.94; s. ... , a model for purity, 15.105; purity of s., 15.109; excellence of s., 15.111; pure s., 15.113; distinguished by their s., 15.114; s. ... of all Mr. Hoffman’s books, 15.119; a s. half plausible, 15.128; s. that served as the vehicle, 15.129; His [Richard Adams Locke’s] prose s., 15.136; s. of the characters, 15.147; literary s., 15.150; s. of writing, 15.154; s. of chirography, 15.159; s. of composition, 15.162; the literary s., 15.166; vigor of s., 15.169; Mr. Stone’s literary s., 15.173; the supposed writer’s usual s., 15.176; s. had been burlesqued, 15.176; antique Johnsonism of s., 15.180; precision and finish of ... s., 15.181; s. ... lucid, terse, and pungent, 15.183; chief feature ... literary s., 15.185; s. of the characters, 15.186; the s. ... formed or decided, 15.187; in s ... most inflated, 15.191; literary s., 15.192; precision of ... s., 15.193; vivacity of s., 15.196; the literary s., 15.197; literary s., 15.198; comic s., 15.198; literary s., 15.199; in the same s., 15.199; masculine s. of thought, 15.203; traits of ... literary s., 15.205; s. ... as a writer, 15.205; merits of s. for a literary reputation, 15.206; literary s., 15.212; a s. which ... flies off into whimsicalities, 15.212; much vigour of s., 15.216; in keeping with ... s., 15.221; precision of s., 15.222; modulation of s., 15.227; impurity of s., 15.227; s. regards ... tone, 15.227; Irving’s s., 15.227; lamentable s., 15.227; Dr. Channing’s s., 15.227; a chastened s., 15.228; terseness of ... s., 15.228; s. ... terse, 15.232; literary s., 15.234; ordinary clerk s., 15.235; literary s., 15.238; plain, unornamented s., 15.242; s., has every possible fault, 15.243; most inartistical s., 15.249; finish of s., 15.251; usual clerk s., 15.235; vivid drollery of his s., 15.256; s. of Gibbon, 16.14; s. ... frequently commended, 16.14; concise s., 16.16; poetical s., 16.27; ( ... a distinct s. ...), 16.27; precision of s., 16.34; chief merit ... of the s., 16.34; verbal s., 16.39; s. ... so involute, 16.40; s. ... purity itself, 16.43; s. ... of Curran, 16.48; in this s., 16.52; (so far as s. is concerned), 16.58; mechanical s. of “Athens,” 16.66; to s. McPherson’s “Ossian,” 16.72; s. is pure, 16.94; s. ... pure and sparkling, 16.98; diffuseness ... s., 16.103; gaucherie in s., 16.106; the more prosaic a poetical s., 16.154; s of criticism, 16.166.

STYLES:  of all poetical s., 12.34; most singular s., 16.110; purest of all poetical s., 16.150.

STYLIST:  a bad s., 10.127; so original a s., 11.60; most accurate s. of his age, 13.200.

STYLISTS:  s. as Mr. Briggs, 15.67; despicable as s., 15.227.

SUBLIME:  into the energetic and the s., 8.9; moral and physical s., 8.127; energies of the s., 8.174; picture as s., 8.218; sense ... of the s., 8.282; the s. and the mystical, 8.282N; the most s. music of Heaven, 8.306; of the s., 9.305; immature poet to think himself s., 10.156; inclusive of the s., 11.77; beauty heightened into the s., 11.77-78; separate the Unknown from the s., 11.254; forms of the ... s., 11.254; s. spirit, 11.255; Truth is ... s., 11.257; horror s. in its simplicity, 12.16; passage quoted as “s.,” 12.23; between the s. and the ridiculous, 12.24; inclusive of the s., 12.38; a sense of the s., 13.150; between the s. and the ridiculous, 13.201; soars into the s., 13.206; writings of antiquity more s., 14.59; a sense of the s., 14.268; this s. end is ... attained, 14.275; Beauty ... inclusive of the s., 14.275; inclusive of the s., 15.13N; in picturing the s., 15.71.

SUBLIMELY:  the s. ridiculous, 8.298; s. imaginative, 11.268.

SUBLIMELY:  s. of river scenery, 11.163; s. of everything odd, 11.177; s. of human love, 11.245; loftiest s., 11.257; lines very narrowly missed s., 12.23; compound ... partaking ... of s. or beauty, 12.38; of the respective s. or beauty, 12.38; lines narrowly missed s., 13.201; character of s., 15.13N; respective s. or beauty, 15.13N; beauty, or s., 16.156; beauty or s. of the things combined, 16.156.


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞


TALE: Horse-Shoe Robinson ... a t., 8.4; a t. in the Diary of a Physician, 8.59; the opening of the t., 8.65; personages in the t., 8.70; absolute conclusion of this t., 8.74; t. of the Peasantry, 8.75; the magic t. of Ellen Wareham, 8.75; magical t., 8.96; t. neither ... verisimilar, nor ... well told, 8.121; well executed t., 8.121; t. betrays ... ignorance of law, 8.121; t. of the year seventy-five, 8.121; disposition, ... character ... preserved, throughout the t8.148; peculiar features of the t. [“Country Cousin”], 8.161; t. of striking vicissitudes, 8.161; t. [St. Catharine’s Eve”] appertains to ... thirteenth century, 8.161; t. for the young, 8.161; a t. of seduction, 8.192; a t. of the Present Times, 8.193; dénouement of our t., 8.201; the magic t., 4; the tendency of the t., 9.115; epoch of his [Mr. French’s] t., 9.123; heroine of the t., 9.146; a t. of a young hunter, 9.286; the t. of an Indian maiden, 9.290; fervidly poetical t., 10.53; dénouement of his t., 10.117; A good t., 10.120; the brief t., 10.122; commencing the t., 10.147; occupied with the t., 10.147; body of the t., 10.149; title ... t. bears, 10.149; excellences of the t., 10.152; a t. which will secure, 10.155; the “t.” of Powhatan, 10.167; thrilling t., 10.175; romantic love-t., 10.176; (the hero of the t. ...), 10.199; t. entitled, 10.209; ( ... effect of the t.), 11.51; “ ... to project this t.,” 11.53; call ... attention to a point in the t., 11.55; hero of the t 11.62; equal to the t., 11.63; ruin of the t., 11.93; the t. ... as ... prose opportunity, 11.102; twattle called t.-writing, 11.102; The t. proper, 11.106; the prose t., 11.107; the brief t., 11.108; artist ... constructed a t., 11.108; The idea of the t., 11.108; t. has ... superiority over ... poem, 11.108; aim of the t., 11.109; writer of the prose t., 11.109; a prose t., 11.109; force of Mr. Hawthorne’s t., 11.111; The t. commences, 11.207; t. is a mere succession, 11.209; “worldly wisdom,” or selfishness, of the t., 11.261; original t., 13.93; an admirable t., 13.97; single t. ... by Hawthorne, 13.145; in a second t., 13.145; The t. proper affords the fairest field, 13.151; the brief prose t., 13.152; In the brief t., 13.153; artist has constructed a t., 13.153; idea of the t., 13.153; a t. of romantic passion, 13.157; t. of that “true love,” 13.225; t. in Plato’s “Convivium,” 14.44; the t. of the despised Aschen-possel, 14.50; respectably skilful t.-writer, 14.75; ability in t.-writing, 14.75; could a t. unfold, 14.162; an excellent fairy-t., 14.190; a t. writer, 15.11; merit of the t., 15.56; horrors of the t., 15.86; satirical t., 15.249; soon a t. unfold, 16.46; an astonishing t., 16.46; In the t. proper, 16.171; in the t., 16.171; t.-writers, 16.171.

TALES:  t. of love, 8.95; seven t., 8.120; enchantment of the Arabian t., 8.235; His [L. A. Wilmer’s] prose t., 8.236; the best of the t., 8.265; t. are six in number, 9.71; putting various t. into the mouths of a social party, 10.144; fragments of t., 10.207; t. of ordinary sequence, 11.64; love-t., 11.91; broad t., 11.92; American t. of high merit, 11.102; by no means all “t.,” 11.103; speak here chiefly of the t., 11.104; collection of t., 11.104; by no means all t., 11.104; t. proper, 11.105; finest t., 11.109; t. of ratiocination, 11.109; t. of effect, 11.109; American t. of real merit, 11.109; Hawthorne’s t., 11.110; the best of these [“Twice-Told Tales”] t., 11.110; objection ... to ... these t., 11.113; a collection of t., 12.247; (one of his [William Gilmore Simm’s] first t. ...), 12.248; other t. of the volume, 12.249; of short t., 13.96; All the t., 13.96; Of skillfully-constructed t., 13.153; happiest and best-sustained t., 13.154; t. of Willis, 13.154; under the head of t., 14.74; in subsequent t., 14.75; best of his t., 14.75; t. which ... are ... faultless, 14.89; t. (written ... for the magazines), 15.15; charm ... of these t., 15.15; occasional t., 15.27; t. ... cleverly written, 15.28; brief t., 15.; collection of t., 15.85; more regularly constructed t., 15.85; a writer of t., 15.90; reading all t., 15.90; writer of poems 15.107; brief t. and essays, 15.196; prose t., 15.216; t. were good, 15.236; t. distinguished by ... peculiarities, 15.240.

TASTE:  a fine t., 8.10; poetical t., 8.42; the t. ... of Miss Leslie, 8.50; possessing talent or t., 8.77; persons of t., 8.100; fine t., 8.125; t. exquisitely alive; 8.137; bad t., 8.156; villainously bad t., 8.156; fine t., 8.160; fine t., 8.169; that t. must be fastidious, 8.173; each article in good t., 8.177; exhibit his t., 8.203; Georgian t., 8.259; mechanical t., 8.334; standard of correct t. in literature, 8.334; t. for chaste and instructive reading, 8.334; good t., 9.1; selected with t., 9.49; a t. for science, 9.50; discrepancies of t., 9.66; bad t., 9.74; bad t., 9.77; claim to t., 9.92; corrupted t., 9.153; a modification of feeling, t., 9.163; natural and cultivated t., 9.195; little t., 9.198; finer t., 9.305; refined t., 10.28; man of t., 10.42; in worse t., 10.54; bad t., 10.56; Similes ... in good t., 10.68; a fine t., 10.70; t. of the publishers, 10.85; correct t., 10.91; the essence of sculptural t., 10.120; classical t., 10.142; shockingly bad t., 10.205; His [Bulwer’s] t. is exquisite, 10.212; involving a question of ... t., 10.213; reader of t., 10.215; public t., 10.222; public t., 11.18; t. of an Ariel, 11.25; the critical and the popular t., 11.40; correct t., 11.50; no disputing about t., 11.65; his own t., 11.65; t. ... is an arbitrary something, 11.65; laws of t., 11.65; ( ... keen “t.” of genius ...), 11.66; the pure intellect, t., 11.70; t. between the intellect and the moral sense, 11.70; t. alone to inform us of Beauty, 11.71; handmaiden but of t., 11.71; while t. contents herself, 11.71; sole arbiter is t., 11.75; ill. t., 11.80; uncultivated t., 11.87; lower t., 11.88; t. higher and more refined, 11.88; addressing the general t., 11.88; true t., 11.98; fastidiousness of t., 11.106; imagination ... controlled by t., 11.111; t. displayed in the selections, 11.125; nearly amounting to t., 11.146; ill t., 11.149; ill t., 11.150; fine t., 11.150; a man of t., 11.156; a man not more of t., 11.158; ineffable bad t., 11.170; good t., 11.173; Every reader of t., 11.194; cultivation of t., 11.209; want of t., 11.222; bad t., 11.264; refined t., 11.275; scholastic t., 12.133; matters of t., 12.165; bad t., 12.194; debased in t., 12.213; reflecting credit on the t., 12.233; variable t., 12.240; external t., 12.254; classicism of t., 12.255; men of t., 12.257; offence against t., 13.18; t. was the guide, 13.34; antique t., 13.35; “ ... t. is the guide, ... ,” 13.35; the engrafting of Reason upon Feeling and t., 13.36; with Feeling and t., 13.36; subservient to Feeling and to t., 13.37; constructed with Feeling and with t., 13.37; with Feeling and t. guided and controlled, 13.37; refined t., 13.45; a fine t., 13.52; instances of bad t., 13.94; “bad t.,” 13.94; a very refined t., 13.98; deep feeling and exquisite t., 13.109; delicacy of t., 13.125; ill t. of the editors, 13.128; popular t., 13.142; popular t., 13.142; popular t., 13.147; warping of the t., 13.149; the finest t., 13.155; vexes the true t., 13.186; offence against the finer t., 13.191; our notions of t., 14.101; of t. as regards to the proprietor, 14.102; limits of legitimate t., 14.102; irreconcilable with good t., 14.103; t. in its dying agonies, 14.103; perversion of t., 14.104; deficient in t., 14.105; false in t., 14.105; corruption of t., 14.106; of a certain bias by which t. leads, 14.177; t. manifested by our transcendental poets, 14.179; t. on her death-bed, 14.179; t. kicking in articulo mortis, 14.179; popular and the critical t., 14.196; not below the critical, t., 14.197; cultivated musical t., 14.219; the uncultivated t., 14.219; matters of t., 14.233; my own t., 14.266; Pure Intellect, t., 14.272; place t. in the middle, 14.272; t. informs ... of the Beautiful, 14.273; t. contents herself with ... charms, 14.273; sole arbiter is t., 14.275; t. ... rather unexceptionable, 15.8; t. and discrimination 15.17; Whatever t. he [Mr. Briggs] has, 15.22; t. in letters, Flemish, 15.22; no very refined t., 15.27; exquisite t., 15.32; t. ... not to be disputed, 15.39; general t. of “Arcturus,” 15.59; termed t. or decorum, 15.59; matters of art or t., 15.84; indication of t., 15.117; classicism of t., 15.123; too piquant for the general t., 15.185; fine t., 15.187; the t. of the ultra-romanticists, 15.188; too didactic for the general t., 15.195; belauded ... less for ... t., 15.199; dependence upon ... t., 15.208; every person of t., 15.210; too clerky for our t., 15.211; of fine t., 15.215; a fine t., 15.218; floridity of t., 15.220; the popular t., 15.221; man of talent and t., 15.232; very bad t., 15.240; a refined t., 15.240; fine t., 15.243; t. is fine, 15.243; in t. ... deficient, 15.245; t., nature and reason the antipodes, 15.249; gentleman of t. and judgment, 15.249; gentleman of t., 15.253; not to our t., 15.253; fine t., 15.254; too clerky for our t., 15.256; man of intellect and t., 15.261; the true t., 16.8; man of t., 16.19; or of t., 16.19; a fine t., 16.27; man of t., 16.29; fine t., 16.32; the most correct t., 16.44; more refined t., 16.54; tendency in American t., 16.82; a scholastic t., 16.94; t. tending entirely, 16.101; ultimate throe of t., 16.116; man of t., 16.138; cultivation of the t., 16.163; debased in t., 16.177.

TASTEFUL: excessively, t., 15.59; t. form, 15.123.

TASTEFULLY:  extracts ... t. made, 11.150; room t. furnished, 14.106.

TASTELESS:  t. folly, 9.63; for anything false ... or t., 10.213.

TASTELESSNESS:  elaborate t., 15.237.

TASTES:  rural t., 8.217; British rational t., 8.231; nothing but his [Southey’s] t., 13.199; t. ... resemblance to those of ... Nicholas Biddle, 15.40; t. akin, 15.91; to have refined t., 15.155.

TOTALITY:  termed by Schlegel, “the unity or t. of interest,” 8.126; t. of effect, 8.126; the beauty of unity, t., 10.40; the unity or t. of effect, 10.122; the unity or t. of interest, 11.79; t. of effect, 11.79; force derivable from t., 11.107; an idea of the vast t., 12.31; immense benefit of t., 13.153; t. is at once destroyed, 14.196; t., or unity, of effect, 14.196; t. of effect or impression, 14.267; They [Mary E. Hewitt’s poems] lack unity, t., ultimate effect, 15.123.

TRANSCENDENTAL:  t. all about Law, 10.131; so deeply t. a nature, 11.15; t. reasons to account for it, 12.109; (the t. vagabonds!), 13.9; not sufficiently t., 13.12; t. notions, 13.43; taste manifested by our t. poets, 14.179; t. poets, 15.70.

TRANSCENDENTALISM:  conceited piece of t., 13.169; [“Essays on the Classic and Romantic Schools”] tinctured with t., 15.43.

TRANSCENDENTALIST:  a t. as Miss Fuller, 13.170.

TRANSCENDENTALISTS:  by styling themselves t., 11.253; cant of the t., 12.5; audience of t., 13.12; speak of the t., 13.129; nor can all the t. ... confound, 13.150; poetry of the so called t., 14.208; mysticism of the t., 15.61; one of least intolerable of ... Boston t., 15.69; affectation of the t., 15.79.

TRUTH:  no less t. than modesty, 8.115; so pregnant with t., 8.119; naked and unvarnished t. 8.121; in confining either his [Simms’] t. or his fable, t., 8.147; stating the t., 8.147; where t. is sought, 8.215; persuaded of ... t., 8.223; Historic t., 8.227; t. guilty of all the inefficiency of Fiction, 8.227; speaking, in all instances — the t., 8.237; the vivid t. to nature, 8.261; air of t., 8.265; consciousness of this t., 8.283N; t. of what we have already assumed, 8.293; undeniable t., 8.322; positive t., 9.17; any serious t., 9.67; the direct t., 9.94; moral t., 9.95; and in t., 9.101; great variety of t., 9.102; historical t., 9.107; relates the whole t., 9.132; impressed with the t., 9.138; luminousness of t., 9.139; evidence of a t., 9.145; profound t., 9.157; more positive t., 9.163; relies on the t., 9.177; the literal t., 9.246; suspected the t., 9.246; unsuspecting the whole t., 9.248; essential value of t., 9.256; the effect of t., 9.263; t. and honor form no exceptions, 9.264; Apply this to t., 9.264; then t. and honor, 9.264; all who esteem t., 9.264; t. and honor ... are most prized, 9.264; then t. and honor, 9.264; unwitting testimony to the t., 10.1; a t. that few ... to deny, 10.10; the whole t. of revelation, 10.10; of the general t., 10.12N; testimony of its t., 10.13; love of t., 10.16; perception of t., 10.28; meant to embody the t., 10.36; beauty of ... t., 10.40; brightest poetical t., 10.72; brightest t. in itself, 10.72; t. ... the result only of the strictest proportion, 10.72; the full t., 10.92; drawn with t., 10.125; very slight foundation in t., 10.143; depicting of t., 10.152; absolute t., 10.157; t. ... is seldom, 10.158; approximate the t., 10.158; revealed t., 10.159; full of minute beauty, and t., 10.175; unadulterated air of t., 10.182; speaking fearlessly the t., 10.184; when t. is out of fashion, 10.184; because it is the t., 10.185; integrity and the t., 10.187; t. ... is the subject, 10.187; wit lies with his t., 10.189; the spirit of severe t., 10.192; singular instance of its t., 10.197; a very remarkable t., 10.207; a question of t., 10.213; founded in reason and in t., 11.2; t. ... not, as yet, made itself heard, 11.18; Dolly Varden is t. itself, 11.61; looks upon as t., 11.69; semblance of t., 11.69; demands of t., 11.70; enforcing this t., 11.70; obstinate oils and waters of Poetry and t., 11.70; intellect deals with t., 11.71; t. of imitation, 11.71; either Duty or t., 11.75; understood as t., 11.76; the aim of instruction, or t., 11.79; chief merit of a picture is its t., 11.84; t. ... not even the aim, 11.84; slight degree of t., 11.84; nothing ... farther from t., 11.84; t. indeed, 11.84; t. is the highest aim, 11.84; affirmed with t., 11.99; basis in t., 11.109; t. ... the aim of the tale, 11.109; (which is t.), 11.133; demonstrates a t., 11.147; received as t., 11.147; substance of t., 11.152; founded in t., 11.176; skill and t., 11.212; ( ... hear it — the t.,), 11.240; reverence the t., 11.244; obstinate oils and waters of Poetry and of t., 11.254; suppose to be t., 11.257; t. is ... sublime, 11.257; t. to be all, 11.257; not t. ... made their thesis, 11.257; t. ... rendered manifest, 11.257; great t., 11.261; speak of her [Miss Barrett] the t., 12.3; possibility of our speaking this t., 12.3; the simple t., 12.9; ( ... greatest t. ...), 12.33; truest ... of poetical styles, t., 12.34; effort of t., 12.40; swear to its t., 12.56; indisputable t., 12.65; the t. of the twentieth part of it, 12.65; investigate their falsehood or their t., 12.77; moral t., 12.140; palpable t., 12.201; traits of nature and t., 12.211; stick to the t., 12.225; far nearer the t., 12.238; seekers of the simple t., 12.241; t. ... injures an epigram, 12.244; historical t., 12.248; syllable of t., 13.10; desire for t., 13.14; not be very far from the t., 13.14; determination to speak the t., 13.31; worshippers of t., 13.32; preaching about t., 13.32; evidences of the t. of intention, 13.107; the t. or falsehood, 13.109; office of either poetry or of the drama to inculcate t., 13.112; conveys the t., 13.113; how this t., 13.113; how any t., 13.113; not in the power of any fiction to inculcate any t. , 13.113; the inculcation of t., 13.113; This is the t., 13.130; not the whole t., 13.130; allegory ... made to enforce a t., 13.148; nearest approach to t., 13.149; to recognize the t., 13.158; essentiality and inspiration is t., 13.158; absolute t., 13.160; office neither of poetry nor of the drama, to inculcate t., 13.179; imitation ... is merely adherence to t. and Reason, 13.196; come still nearer the t., 13.204; the t. should be told, 13.208; absolute t., 13.218; lead us to the t., 14.36; t. of immortality, 14.41; to seize t., 14.91; “t.” in the most ordinary phrase, 14.91; with a great T, t., 14.91; the searcher after t., 14.99; In t., 14.105; to maintain the t., 14.121; t. itself, 14.150; the t. is, 14.163; t. in general, 14.186; t., or the satisfaction of the intellect, 14.198; t. ... demands a precision, 14.198; even t., may not be introduced, 14.198; the nature of t., 14.210; common accentuation express the t., 14.251; object of all Poetry is t., 14.271; demands of t. are severe, 14.272; enforcing a t., 14.272; oils and waters of Poetry and t., 14.272; Intellect concerns itself with t., 14.273; vivid a t. of description, 14.273; no concern whatever ... with t., 14.275; easily distinguished from t., 14.275; the lessons of t., 14.276; t. ... the satisfaction of the Reason, 14.290; in regard to t., 14.290; through the attainment of a t., 14.290; in the least degree to the t., 14.290; a merry effort of t., 15.14N; feel the t. of ... proposition, 15.15; a t.-telling ... preface, 15.48; t. and novelty, 15.84; full of t. and humor, 15.86; very soul of t. and honor, 15.104; t. of the whole affair, 15.134; not ... far from the t., 15.146; sacrificing t. for ... a bon-mot, 15.178; the cause of t., 15.183; desire for t., 15.194; unity of t., 15.247; beneath the t., 16.13; t. ... impulsively uttered, 16.17; fall short of the t., 16.23; “t. ... stranger than fiction,” 16.25; fabricate t., 16.34; the full t., 16.45; embody the t., 16.49; dogged air of t., 16.52; far more of t., 16.68; the essentials of t., 16.92; t. seems to be, 16.121; the t., generally, 16.121; a t. very different, 16.121; admixture of error and t., 16.123; the t. on the topics at issue, 16.124; blinds man to t., 16.129; the solemn t., 16.130; t. to which Bacon alone, 16.149; ( ... the greatest t. ... ), 16.150; the t. ... injures an epigram, 16.155.

TRUTHFULLY:  t. copied, 11.61.

TRUTHFULNESS:  merits are ... t., 10.27; delicate imagination and t., 12.143; combines t. with jeu d’esprit, 12.210; replete with t., 13 ... has reference, 13.113; indispensable t. of the drama, 13.113; blended fervor, delicacy, t., 14.150; t. of the passages, 15.76; the ground of its t., 16.28; t. ... the one overwhelming defect, 16.28; commending the t., 16.28.

TRUTH’S:  for t. sake, 10.158.

TRUTHS:  failure to perceive these t., 10.66; understood as t., 10.81; damaged as t., 13.152; of all t., 14.41; certain moral and physical t., 14.92; damaged as t., 14.268; important t., 15.194; falsities ... received as t., 16.166.


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UNITY:  that indispensable u., 8.75; u. of effect, 8.75; termed by Schlegel, “the u. ... of interest,” 8.126; Mrs. Hemans and Mrs. Sigourney ... at variance with this u., 8.126; to deprive the entire poem of all u. of effect, 8.310; u. of effect, a quality not easily appreciated, 9.46; remarks on the u. of effect, 9.47; completeness and u., 9.208; u., completeness — a beginning, middle and end, 9.279; sonnet demands ... u., 9.294; single thought ... gives u., 9.295; Of his [Bryant’s] ... u., 9.305; Its [“Undine”’s] u. is absolute, 10.37; the beauty of u., 10.40; nothing of u., 10.72; of the spirit of the unique — of u., 10.74; force, from u., 10.75; u. of the novel, 10.122; species of u., 10.122; the u. or totality of effect, 10.122; certain degree of u., 10.146; such u. as may be thus had, 10.146; preserving the u. desired, 10.147; u. ... will impress the metaphysician, 10.176; a species of u., 10.201; (the u. of the writer’s individual thought), 10.201; its [“Lenore”’s] u., 10.223; u. of conception, 11.8; with the force or the u., 11.9; u. of place, 11.59; u. of time, 11.59; the u. or totality of interest, 11.79; at variance with such u., 11.79; u. of conception, 11.83; u. of effect, 11.106; u. cannot be thoroughly preserved, 11.106; without u. of impression, 11.107; sufficient to destroy the true u., 11.108; to deprive it [“Alnwick Castle”] of all u. of effect, 11.199; entire u. of impression, or effect, 11.278; its [“Faint Heart Never Won Fair Lady”’s] u. of effect, 12.210; u. resulting from plot, 13.46; poem ... has u., 13.133; always interfere with that u. of effect, 13.148; to destroy the true u., 13.153; u. of place, 14.63; derivable from u. of impression, 14.196; loss of u., 14.196; totality, or u., of effect, 14.196; (demanding no u.), 14.196; with mere u. of place, 14.204; absolute u., 14.226; vital requisite in all works of Art u., 14.267; to preserve its [art’s] u., 14.267; artistic u. and perfection, 15.46; u. of effect, 15.52; They [Mary E. Hewitt’s poems] lack u., totality, ultimate effect, 15.123; u. of truth, 15.247; u. of God, 16.6; result in u., 16.7; absolute u. of effect, 16.50; entire u. of impression, or effect, 16.57; scruples about u. of place, 16.69; A book remarkable for its artistic u., 16.142.

UTILITARIAN:  the great u., 9.56; most palpable and u., 11.72; degree of u. ability, 11.148; Upon the u., 13.33; the u. ... provinces of the art, 13.34; its [architecture’s] u. departments, 13.35; homely u. views, 15.84.

UTILITARIANISM:  misconceived u., 9.158; tinge of u., 9.192; degrading spirit of u., 10.25; tone of ... u., 16.105.

UTILITARIANS:  conciliate the u., 16.11.


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VERISIMILAR:  tale neither so v., 8.121; to be v., 8.216; more v. than true, 12.108.

VERISIMILITUDE:  never at outrance with ... v., 8.95; potent magic o v., 8.170; simple v., 8.235; joint humor and v., 8.260; arts which give v., 9.139; absurd sacrifices of v., 10.124; pathos, humour, and v., 10.132; gained of v., 11.61; show of v., 12.85; deficiency in v., 12.118; total deficiency in v., 12.118; v. of the play, 12.190; It [speaking aside] ... destroys v., 13.35; that of earnestness or v., 13.148; to describe with great v., 15.87; purity of ... v., 15.109; due v. to any fiction, 15.128; very close v., 15.128.


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WIT:  a mind overflowing with ... w., 8.76; w., especially, ... indisputable, 8.80; neither w. nor humor, 8.151; arrows of ... w., 8.185; of ... w., philosophy, and science, 8.187; some species of w., 8.223; vivid w., 8.223; fine w., 9.18; w. and humor, 9.69; fine w., 10.46; for the reputation of a w., 10.47; w. ... of Horace Walpole, 10.47; other’s w., 10.47; racy w., 10.137; score of sarcasm, vigour, or w., 10.184; w. lies with ... truth, in a well, 10.189; an attack which has neither vigor nor w., 10.214; miracle of w., 10.214; brilliant w., 11.199; genuine w., 11.238; comments upon ... stolidity, for w., 12.17; pure w., 12.40; pseudo w., 12.215; such words as w., 12.216; w. of Hood, 12.233; of the w., 12.235; pure w. or sarcasm, 15.15N; sarcastic w., 15.28; under no circumstances ... w. the forte of Mr. Osborn, 15.48; species of w., approximating humor, 15.86; “w.” ... nothing like a definition of it [mixture of humor and fun], 15.86; clever productions; ... full of ... w., 15.200; w. and universal bonhomie, 15.207; Idol of the w.. 16.31; information or of w., 16.60; eidolon ... ( ... of the w. ...), 16.129; false w. in question, 16.178.

WITS:  living on his w., 9.132.

WITTICISM:  everyday w. and mirth, 10.187.

WITTICISMS:  sparkling w., 13.168; the puny w., 16.118.

WITTY:  hero is w., 8.109; either w. or wise, 8.152; more w., 9.45; most w., 9.67; Frenchman is invariably w., 10.137; ( ... too benevolent to be w.), 12.217; “The Vision” is ... w. enough, 13.167; brilliantly w., 15.88; often w., ... sarcastic, 15.183; w. ... at the expense of a modest young gentleman, 16.143.


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Notes:

None.


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[S:1 - PCV, 1966] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - An Index of Poe's Critical Vocabulary (Dameron and Stagg) (Index to Criticism, P-Z)