Text: J. L. Dameron and L. C Stagg, “Index to Criticism, I-O,” An Index of Poe’s Critical Vocabulary in Poe’s Collected Works, (1966), pp. 25-36 (This material is protected by copyright)


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CRITICISM [[I-O]]

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IDEAL:  i. elevation to moral fortitude, 8.45; i. spectator, 8.46; i. and lofty elevation the beau-i. of feminine disinterestedness, 8.160; in short of the i., 8.301; the purely i., 8.303; burlesque with the i., 8.309; i. elevation of manner, 9.125; passage of Hazlitt’s on the i., 9.145; loftier regions of the i., 9.262; lines are highly i., 9.292; more strictly i. beauty, 9.302; a fine i. elevation, 10.27; more ethereally i., 10.39; of its [music’s] ethereal, its i., 10.42; into the i., 10.62; class of the pseudo-i., 10.62; an i. or imaginative poem, 10.63; false and true i., 10.63; in short, of the i., 10.65; into the i., 10.65; poems ... of the purely i., 10.66; was ever richly i., 10.68; no portion of the i., 10.68; i. beauties, 10.76; loftier regions of the i., 10.126; august regions of the i., 10.153; reader, who is at all i., 10.153; blends so happily with the i., 11.24; more i. compositions, 11.65; at war with the i., 11.148; low burlesque and the i., 11.199; highly i., 11.203; i. beauty, 11.235; more richly i., 11.246; an i. Helusion, 11.256; richly i., 11.279; loftiest exhibitions of the i., 12.16; a more i. ... image, 12.19; a new phase of the i., 12.216; lofty region of the i., 13.46; richly i., 13.134; incarnation of the i., 14.151; the less i., 14.152; of confounding with the i., 14.207; lines ... richly i., 14.271; It [“The Haunted House”] is ... powerfully i., 14.284; i. beauty, 15.53; more truly i., 16.11; richly i., 16.27; one’s i. sense, 16.28; i. ... character, 16.29; ethereally i., 16.50; richly i., 16.57; its i. ... character, 16.137; new phase of the i., 16.178.

IDEALIST:  a true i., 15.118.

IDEALITY:  Thirdly, in i., 8.44; i. of the Greek drama, 8.46; i. of conception, 8.46; i. of representation, 8.46; i. of conception, 8.47; i. of representation, 8.47; Imaginative Faculties, containing ... i., 8.254; Faculty of i., 8.282; deficient share of i., 8.284; faculty of i., 8.284; unaided i. of his competitor, 8.284; phrenological tokens of i., 8.285; i. ... the soul of the Poetic Sentiment, 8.293; i. ... rendered manifest, 8.293; lines ... composed without exercising ... i., 8.295; without reference to i., 8.295; things evince no i., 8.296; what is not i., 8.299; purest i., 8.299N; i. in a wonderful degree, 8.300 i. in these lines [from Culprit Fay], 8.302; i. not of a high order 8.302; highest order of i., 8.306; adjunct to i., 8.309; To i. it [Marco Bozzaris] has few pretensions, 8.312; admissible adjuncts to i., 9.94; glowing i., 9.288; purest i., 9.301; spirit of i., 9.303; higher regions of i., 10.37; loftiness of its i., 10.38; i. in a wonderful degree, 10.64; attributed to i., 10.67; of a high i., 10.89; evince little i., 10.142; i. of the “Curiosity Shop,” 10.154; pathos ... relieved ... by i., 10.154; a duty to call i., 11.18; derives more in i., 11.61; i. high, 11.67; i. not richer than that of Longfellow, 11.68; i. of far loftier character, 11.200; spirit of poetry — i., 11.223; burning with ... i., 11.236; flow of i., 11.241; organ of i., 11.256; scope for an i. 12.15; adjunct to i., 12.139; His [Wilson’s] i., 12.239; he [Wilson] possesses i., 12.239; rich i., 12.246; deficient in i., 13.121; prominent organs of i., 13.140; sustained i. of Mrs. Maria Brooks, 13.19 deficient i., 15.7; more feeling than i., 15.29; Quaintness is an ... adjunct to i., 15.71; their i. ... not so manifest as ... passion, 15.117; i. ... distinguishing trait of ... moral nature, 15.122; high i., 15.234; loftier i., 15.248; i. ... rich and well-disciplined, 15.257; organs of i., 16.11; purity of ... i., 16.50.

IDEALIZING:  most i. manifestations of moral beauty, 15.117.

IMAGINATION:  i. of the most etherial kind, 8.43; rich with i., 8.74; the very soul of passion and i., 8.75; i. ... of the most etherial kind, 8.77 extravagancy of the i. of man, 8.94; i. of the highest order, 8.96; powers of i., 8.135; volition over i., 8.170; The Poetry of ... i., 8.173; a more delicate ... i., 8.223; in one person the i., 8.223; i. is its soul, 8.283; i. is, possibly in man, a lesser degree of the creative power in God, 8.283N; powers of i., 8.293; evidence of i., 8.293; the i. they [lines in Culprit Fay] display, 8.294; lines ... composed without exercising ... i., 8.295; congratulated ... upon ... i., 8.300; i. displayed in Jack the Giant-Killer, 8.301; discovering his own i., 8.301; degree of i., 8.301; i. ... exalted by the moral sentiment of beauty, 8.303; rich i., 8.309; delicacy of i., 9.73; without a jot of i., 9.97; delicate i., 9.101; leaving much to the i., 9.138; vigorous and lofty i., 9.195; influence upon her [Mrs. Hemans’] i., 9.197; less i., 9.279; evidences of fine i., 9.282; rich i., 9.287; Of i., we discover much, 9.305; delicate i., 9.305; influence upon the popular i., 10.1; exquisite management of i., 10.38; [Fancy] in contradistinction to i., 10.61; fancy as nearly creates as the i., 10.61-62; distinction, of degree, between the fancy and the i, 10.62 congratulated ... upon ... 1., 10.64; i. displayed in Jack the Giant-Killer, 10.64; i. to surpass that of the author, 10.64; just distinction between the fancy and the i., 10.65; everything of i., 10.66; that happiest quality, — i., 10.67; i. ... not the leading feature of ... Moore, 10.67; i. ... is vivid, 10.72; fitful (unsteady) i., 10.73; ( ... wildest vigour of i.), 10.122; chaste, vigorous, and glorious i., 10.153; The i. ... as great in this latter work [“Undine”], 10.155; dazzled the i., 10.216; our i. is feeble, 11.9; i. ... a “counterfeit presentment,” 11.17; the human i., 11.22; no very lofty i., 11.23; true i., 11.23; the soul of the Muse (i.), 11.24; clearly deduce ... the i., 11.73; “Invention” ... or “i.,” 11.74; richest i., 11.80; Hawthorne’s distinctive trait is invention, creation, i., originality, 11.110; boldest i., 11.111; i. ... controlled by taste, 11.111; high i., 11.113; genius, called i., 11.144; true i., 11.159; as much i., 11.159; delicacy of i., 11.263; i. ... is of the most refined, 11.266; refined and picturesque i., 11.267; true i., 11.271; purest i., 11.273; the i. of Maria del Occidente, 11.275; thus grief the i., 11.277; radiant i., 12.30; an i. even more vigorous, 12.35; creates as the i., 12.37; distinction ... between the fancy and the i., 12.38; No subject exalts it into i., 12.38; i., Fancy, Fantasy, and Humor have in common ... Combination and Novelty, 12.38; i. ... the artist of the four, 12.38; pure i. chooses, 12.38; range of i., 12.39; estimate of i., 12.39; delicate i., 12.143; i. is vigorous, 12.166; passages of ... i., 12.195; what is i., 12.216; Fancy and the i., 12.216; realm of i., 12.217; more of true i., 12.219; true i., 12.236; glow of ... i., 12.239; Man of i., 12.249; richest and most vigorous i., 12.249; bold and rich i., 13.18; i. of the spectator, 13.50; by dint of no i., 13.53; gum-elastic i. of an infant, 13.66; pure and high i., 13.88; more of genuine i., 13.92; a very vigorous i., 13.95; noblest of all attributes of genius — i., 13.120; equal of Mrs. Maria Brooks in i., 13.125; fancy, as contradistinguished from i. proper, 13.125; ever-present force of i., 13.143; most radiant i., 13.155; let down the i., 13.161; far inferior to ... that of the i., 13.168; noblest poetical requisite — i., 13.182; supply all the i. requires, 13.186; more of the true i., 13.188; passages of true i., 13.191; let down the i. from its pride of place, 13.220; bold i. of a poet, 13.224; her [Mrs. Lewis’] i., 13.224; enkindle the i., 14.155; most delicate i., 14.180; the i. of Mr. Somebody, 14.180; most delicate i. 14.182; No subject exalts it [Fancy] into i., 14.183; 1.has not been unjustly ranked, 14.187; knowledge ... from a highly stimulated i., 14.187; to goad the i., 14.190; Mr. Longfellow is a man of i., 14.264; delicate and ethereal i., 14.270; no great range of i., 14.277; to deny Moore i., 14.282; fancy as nearly creates as the i., 15.13N; i., fancy, fantasy and humour, have in common ... elements, 15.13N; i. is ... artist, 15.13N; pure i., 15.13N; range of i., 15.14N; our estimate of i., 15.14N; true i., 15.15; a true i., 15.17; passages of rich i., 15.38; i. is not Mr. Osborn’s forte, 15.49; “pure i.,” 15.65; he [C. P. Cranch] has i., 15.69; i. ... in everything she [C. M. Kirkland] does, 15.87; much i. and sensibility, 15.90; true i., 15.102; graceful and brilliant i., 15.105; classic i., 15.113; however rich the i., 15.130; dint of i., 15.136; true i., 15.136; a restless and vivid i., 15.156; a vivid i., 15.204; a fine i., 15.228; i. of no common order, 15.230; vigor of ... i., 15.239; in i. ... deficient, 15.245; rich i., 15.259; i. of the reader, 16.4; that he has i. is more, 16.8; i. ... of a lofty order, 16.34; more i., 16.41; i. ... rich, 16.43; management of i., 16.50; all the i., 16.54; grief the i., 16.56; i. ... greatly excited, 16.104; German ... i., and ... other qualities of impulse, 16.116; less i. and warmer sympathies, 16.117; true i., 16.144; glowing i., 16.147; The pure i., 16.155; the range of i., 16.156; our estimate of i., 16.156; the nose of the mob is its i., 16.160; “muscular i.,” 16.162; the i. of Man, 16.167; domain of the true i., 16.178.

IMAGINATION’S:  i. half sister, 15.

IMAGINATIONS:  “ ... effect produced on their i. ... ,” 13.198.

IMAGINATIVE:  i. Faculties, 8.253; i. faculties, 8.284; i. power, 8.293; i. faculty, 9.145; rich i. conception, 9.205; i. portraiture, 9.284; i. ... commencement, 9.288; an ideal or i. poem, 10.63; who are themselves i., 10.65; prose romances ... to designate as i., 10.65-66; paths of i. lore, 10.86; the i., 11.72; of the really i., 11.96; truly i. intellect, 11.106; highest order of the i. intellect, 11.148; most i., 11.159; i., intellects, 11.253; sublimely i., 11.268; peculiarly i., 11.270; purely i., 12.15; i. conception, 12.18; harmony of an i. work, 12.39; most i. ... poets, 12.110; two finely i. stanzas, 12.177; i. reader, 12.216; i. men, 12.216; never truly i 12.217; i. spirit, 12.219; They [extracts] are graceful, ... i., 13.58; specimens of i. poetry, 13.121; highest class of poetry, the i.-natural, 13.135; [ ... i. extracts], 13.136; richly i. lines, 13.137; aggregation of ... i. passages, 13.162; i. affect, 13.199; passages ... highly i., 13.209; aggregation of its i. passages, 13.221; richly i., 13.225; landscape of an i. cast, 14.107-108; i. character, 14.151; an i. effect, 14.180; of the i. man, 14.187; more weirdly i., 14.283; It [“The Haunted House”] is ... i., 14.284; harmony of an i. work, 15.14N; gloriously i., 15.53; truly i., 15.61; an i. poet, 15.63; i. ... or poetical ideas, 15.70; every (i.) person, 15.76; richly i., 15.135; passionate, as well as i., 15.184; i. powers, 15.216; richly i. production, 16.11; richly i. thoughts, 16.26; our i. faculties, 16.33; i., upon the whole, 16.97; harmony of an i. work, 16.156; a noble composition ... i., 16.176; the i. reader, 16.178; purely i., 16.178.

IMITATE:  If any music must i. anything, 10.43; to i. was out of the question, 12.32; Mr. Longfellow can continuously i., 12.42; i. it from every body, 12.69; people will i. the nobles, 14.102; If music ... i. anything, 16.29; teaches it to i., 16.109; if music ... i. any thing, 16.138; to i. was out of the question, 16.149.

IMITATED:  i. with close precision, 11.114; i. by us [Americans], 13.43; it [thought] has been i., 13.181; cavity ... was i., 14.9; i. at all, 15.254; manners i., 16.36; things i. are identical, 16.122.

IMITATES:  human figure ... i. a statue, 13.52.

IMITATING:  justifiable in i. this silly practice, 8.156; i. the entireness of the volume [“The Old Curiosity Shop, and Other Tales”], 10.142; i. the rhythm of i., 12.27; i. the repetition of phrase, 12.69; i. ... from Coleridge, 12.69; charged Mr. Longfellow with i. it, 12.88.

IMITATION:  i. ... visible [in Swallow Barn], 8.4; i. of Sir Walter Scott, 8.73; in i. of the Edinburgh Ballantyne Club, 8.86; worst species of i., 8.109; solely by i., 8.124; mannerisms of i., 8.125; a backwoods i. of Sir Somebody Guloseton, 8.151; sin of i., 8.218; i. of Sterne, 9.67; Three Hundred Years Hence is an i., 9.71; i. of Shelley, 9.75; sin of i., 9.113; beaten paths of i., 9.126; Without being chargeable ... with i., 9.265; i. of Nature, 10.28; i. of “Hyperion,” 10.40; i. in musical sounds, 10.42; i. should be limited, 10.43; sin of i., 10.53; i. ... perceptible in higher particulars, 10.53; i. of Collins’ “Ode to the Passions,” 10.141; leading sin of i., 10.183; i. ... conveyed ... higher qualities, 10.183; Servility of i., 10.184; i. of the Swift and Rochester school, 10.184; erred through i., 10.194; the i. of Fagin, 10.200; a degrading i., 11.5; an i. from Campbell, 11.23; obvious i. of Longfellow’s Hymn to the Night, 11.29; another accident of i., 11.34; gross i., 11.60; a gross i., 11.60; errors of affectation and i., 11.67; truth of i., 11.71; i. of Longfellow, 11.80; speaking of i., 11.87; powers of i., 11.88; species of i., 11.88; close observation and i., 11.88; servile i. of the “Don Juan,” 11.134; (betraying her [Miss Talley], unconsciously, into i..), 11.158; a well executed i., 11.195; i. of Boz’s style, 11.238; i. of the old English ballad, 12.14; a very palpable i., 12.16; sin of i., 12.35; danger of i., 12.37; innocent of the i., 12.65; kind of i., 12.87; accuse Mr. Longfellow of i., 12.88, accusing me [Poe] of i., 12.88; supposed i., 12.88; accusing Mr. Longfellow of i., 12.89; upon this i., 12.93; charge of i., 12.95; establish at least the i., 12.101; charging Mr. Longfellow with i., 12.103; in charging him with i., 12.103; sin of i., 12.108; supine spirit of i., 12.119; spirit of i., 12.126; i. of Tennyson, 12.171; i. from John Neal’s poem, 12.174; i. of Bryant’s “Waterfowl,” 12.176; i. of Barry Cornwall’s ... Tom-Foolery, 12.177; adversary of Invention is i., 13.33; no reference to i., 13.34; spirit of i., 13.37; i. to render Reason subservient to Feeling and to Taste, 13.37; stupid i. of Sancho Panza, 13.65; obvious vein of i., 13.71; i. of “Miserrimus,” 13.93; ground for the charge of i., 13.93; a blindfold i. of a “come-by-chance,” 13.152; sin of i., 13.167; i. ... is merely adherence to Truth and Reason, 13.196; advantages of the “i.,” 13.196; i. of the living animal, 14.8; i. of David’s Psalms, 14.49; weak i., 14.166; palpable i. of the former, 14.182; modern epic is ... blindfold i., 14.267; i. of Smollett, 15.20; i., produces an unfavorable impression, 15.20; management of her [Mrs. Mowatt’s] i., 15.30; close i. of “Don Juan,” 17.52; “Libraries” in i., 15.58; consequent i. of “The Spectator,” 15.60; an i. in its external appearance, 15.62; proneness to i., 15.63; inexcusable sin ... is i., 15.65; a very clever i., 15.83; of i. ... not the slightest ... taint, 15.109; positive i., 15.120-121; i. of Don Juan, 15.191; sins of ... i., 15.191; i. ... verging upon ... theft, 15.191; an i. of Don Juan, 15.222; i. of “Collins’ Ode to the Passions,” 15.248; elegant i., 15.249; stain of the i., 15.254; i. in music, 16.29; limit the i., 16.29; to attempt i., 16.36; i. of the “Turkish Spy,” 16.40; barbarian attempts at i., 16.44; i. of foreign ... models, 16.79; aptitude at i., 16.96; exact points of the i., 16.97; leads ... inevitably to i., 16.97; penchant for i., 16.97; i. of the Brutus, sive de Claris Oratoribus, 16.103; propensity to i., 16.109; a respectful i. of Carlyle, 16.122; i. of the same character, 16.122; attempts at absolute i., 1.6.137; i. should be limited, 16.138.

IMITATIONS:  The i. ... from Pelham, 8.196; like all i., 11.238; Longfellow’s i., 12.86; i. of thought, 12.86; i. of style, 12.87; such i. as this, 12.87; one of his [Longfellow’s] i., 12.87; a score or two of i., 12.103; i. of it [“School for Scandal”], 12.117; intentional i., 12.169; i. of Elizabethan drama, 13.36; as i. of life, 14.28; but very indifferent i., 14.28; in these i., 14.93; comprehensive i. in English, 15.48; persevered in his i., 15.254.

IMITATIVE:  less of the i., 10.222; in a peculiar i. speciousness, 11.146; i. faculties, 11.237; i. vapors, 12.33; chief of the i. arts, 12.119; art is i., 13.33; most i. arts, 13.33: Sculpture ... most i. of all arts, 13.34; its [drama’s] i. portion, 13.34; the principal of the i. arts, 13.34; the principal of the i. arts, 13.35; Trumbull’s clumsy and i. work, 13.165; (Mr. Lowell) i. as usual, 13.169; i. and strong, 13.196; the i. arts, 16.71; the i. propensity, 16.71; heaping up i. vapors, 16.149.

IMITATIVENESS:  more than occasional i., 12.167; inferior i. of painting, 13.34; in the ratio of their i., 13.35; chief sin is i., 13.209; direct ratio of its non-i., 16.72; source of the i., 16.79; His [Thomas Buchanan Read’s] sin is i., 16.145.

IMITATOR:  Mrs. Sigourney ... an i., 8.125; i. of the Scotch novelist, 9.169; on the part of his i., 11.13; observant i., 12.36; to prove ... an i., 12.78; a good i. of Henry B. Hirst, 13.212; a determined i., 15.4; most audacious i. in America, 16.97.

IMITATORS:  brainless i., 8.309; Sculptors, painters, dramatists, are ... i., 13.35; i. of Macaulay, 13.195; herd of ... little i., 14.92; adopted by his [Gibbon’s] i., 14.93; common failing ... with i., 15.20; host of brainless i., 15.200; all i., 16.72; i. ... not, necessarily, unoriginal, 16.97; gross i., 16.97; great i. are poets, 16.97; i. who are his contemporaries, 16.157.

INCIDENT:  i. is tolerably managed, 8.59; i. upon which hinges ... interest of the narrative, 8.96; i. ... worthy of Miss Sedgwick, 8.98; leading i., of the novel, 8.149; not one original i. or idea, 8.184; chain of fictitious i., 8.224; every essential i., 9.26; legend from this i., 9.31; (an i. upon which the whole narrative depends), 9.118; This i. determines Rolfe, 9.120; improbability of the main i., 9.123; crowded with i., 9.259; little i., 10.20; crowded with i., 10.35; involution of i., 10.117; an i. utterly without aim, 10.119; nice and complex adjustment of i., 10.121; a startling i., 10.129; i. ... the sole thing which answers, 10.200; one i. begets another, 10.200; a dearth of i., 10.201; story ... scrambled through by means of i., 10.218; rich variety of i., 10.218; not a good i., 11.13; originality ... of i., 11.103; a well-known i., 11.111; each little modicum of i., 11.136; i. ... naturally and effectively conceived, 11.212; exaggeration of character or i., 12.118; leading i., 12.189; the leading i., 12.212; mere i., 12.224; disarrange any single i. involved, 13.45; in Nature we meet with no such combination of i., 13.46; abound in irrelevant i., 13.47; in i., we mean, 13.47; “ ... love of the Spanish student for the Gipsy girl” ... called an “i.,” 13.59; “main i.,” 13.60; indebted for an “i. only,” 13.60; independence of the i., 13.67; not appear to arise ... from any i., 13.67; scarcely a single i., 13.69; not an i. ... not ... in ... comedies of intrigue attributed to Calderon and Lope de Vega, 13.70; action and earthly i., 13.112; combinations ... of i., 13.145; picturesque combination of i., 13.154; every i. has its proper position, 13.220; narrative ... replete with i., 13.224; her [Mrs. Lewis’] range of i. wide, 13.224; complexity of i., 14.188; i. of the day, 14.193; wrought by i., 14.194; both of i. and tone, 14.194; effect of insulated i., 14.204; amused by the i., 14.207; an array of i., 14.207; tedious repetition of slang and i., 15.199; novel and ingenious i., 16.104; variety of i., 16.171.

INCIDENTFUL:  eventful or i. love, 13.60.

INCIDENTS:  a succession of stirring i., 8.4; i. ... seldom been surpassed, 8.73; i. occurring in ... manner ... unknown to the Romans, 8.107; common i. of life, 8.127; range of i., 8.141; fictitious i., 8.141; some i. at sea, 8.217; blending and contrasting of its i., 8.226; i. of extraordinary force, 8.229; real i., 8.258; such i. as occurred, 8.320; some tolerable i., 9.32; leading i., 9.107; introduction of his [Professor Ingraham’s] i., 9.113; i. are well conceived, 9.137; meeting with no i., 9.239; i. with which she [Mary Scott] is enveloped, 9.260; overloaded with i., 10.28; irrelevant i., 10.28; minute and conflicting i., 10.69; i. made up of the struggles of the young men, 10.115; plot ... woven from the i., 10.116; leading i., 10.117; the latter i. ... emenations, 10.118; remarkable i., 10.135; story ... not ill-conceived in its i., 10.176; swallow the ... i., 10.198; i. ... inadapted and improbable, 10.211-212; i. are improbable, 10.218; character of ... i., 10.218; mere i., 11.11; mere i., 11.11; fluent from the i., 11.80; fashioned ... thoughts to accommodate ... i., 11.108; invents such i., 11.108; i. of the world of 1839, 11.141; i. ... common property of every novelist, 11.209; i. of ... melodramatic absurdity, 11.211; deduced from the i., 11.247; number or paucity of the ... i., 12.78; i. as one person supplying another’s place, 12.117; i. are admirably conceived, 12.186; i. ... vivid yet natural, 12.210; a mere succession of i., 13.44; arranging the ... i., 13.46; i. are evidently irrelevant, 13.47; i. have no ultimate effect, 13.47; influential i. of a drama of five acts, 13.48; that [originality] of the several i., 13.59; hackneyed i., 13.59; originates the i., 13.60; true i. of his [Longfellow’s] story, 13.60; inconsequence of the i., 13.62; not appear to arise ... from any ... i., 13.67; feebleness of the i., 13.69; such i. as the child stolen by gipsies, 13.69; allusion to book i., 13.71; i. are antique, 13.73; thesis and i. of the two works, 13.93; its [“Elfrida, a Dramatic Poem”] i. inconsequential, 13.109; thoughts to accommodate ... i., 13.153; invents such i., 13.153; true interest of the i., 13.161; i. are well adapted, 13.177; its [“Elfrida”’s] i. unconsequential, 13.178; some i. of the first wooing, 13.179; true interest of the i., 13.220; some of the i., 14.50; the i. of this story [“Peter Snook”], 14.89; i. of his [Byron’s] parting, 14.150; by making the i., 14.193; by ordinary i., 14.194; burlesque upon ... conventionality of stage i., 15.29; i. ... striking and original, 15.46; salient i., 15.57; i. ... singular and picturesque, 15.86; i. of a voyage to Cuba, 15.92; i. ... well adapted to dramatic purposes, 15.96; i. ... better woven into ... tragedy, 15.119; i. interwoven, 15.120; points, or i., 16.10; perplexed i., 16.27; i. are admirably conceived, 16.109; i. ... striking and original, 16.142.

INDEFINITE:  a sense of ... i. ... delight, 9.94; necessity for the i., 10.43; plot ... conveys ... i. meaning, 10.116; sense of ... i., 12.139; miserably i., 12.174; some under-current, however i., of meaning, 14.207; ( ... i. idea of “duty” ...), 15.117; i. glimpse, 16.6; The i. is an element in the true, 16.28; necessity for the i., 16.138; this i. word “grace,” 16.144.

INDEFINITIVENESS:  wild license and i., 10.41; an i. recognized by every musician, 10.41; ratio of its [music’s] i., 10.42; i. ... essentials of true music, 10.43; to hang an i., 10.92; “i.” and “general imbecility, ” 13.10; a very gross i., 13.78; a suggestive i. of meaning, 16.28; i. is an element, 16.29; license and i., 16.136; an i. recognized by every musician, 16.137; in the ratio of its i., 16.137; i. ... one of the essentials of true music, 1.138.

INTRIGUE:  a love-i., 8.225; German critics term i., 9.265; mere i., 10.116; dramas of i., 12.119; unnecessary and impertinent i., 13.43; this matter of i., 13.43; bits of i., 13.44; in spite of that i., 13.44; irrelevancy of i., 13.47; examples of ... irrelevancy of i., 13.48; comedies of i., 13.70; dramas of i., 15.29.

INTRIGUES:  i. so obtrusively forced, 13.48; i. perseveringly, 13.48.


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LION:  chief l. of the day, 8.31.


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MELANCHOLY:  m. details, 8.160; with his [Mr. Ulric’s] m., 8.200; unaffected m., 7.236; a species of m., 8.296; mother ... becomes m., 9.126; into a m. derangement, 9.136; she grows m., 9.187; tone of ... m., 9.285; tender m., 10.34; profound sense of m., 10.93; m. death, 10.195; m. theme, 10.221; touching air of m., 11.23; m. is inseparable, 11.24; constitutional m., 11.106; a tone of m., 11.113; m. regret, 11.278; Byronic affectation of m., 12.201; taint of m., 12.234; more of an earnest m., 13.101; peculiarly m. expression, 13.140; inherited the m. temperament, 13.215; bordering upon m., 13.216; m. ... most legitimate of all the poetical tones, 14.198; with that m. ... the tone of the poem, 14.200; poem of m. tone, 14.201; “Of all m. topics ...,” 14.201; “ ... the most m.,” 14.201; “ ... most m. of topics” 14.201; m. character of the word [“Nevermore”], 14.201; m. heart of the student, 14.207; intense m., 14.279; gentle, loving, m., 15.110; from doubt to m., 15.110; from m. to madness, 15.110; in temperament, m., 15.126; m. regret, 16.56.

METAPHYSICAL: bizarre fiction, ... partly m., 8.231; such m. acumen, 8.284; m. than poetical powers, 8.285; ( ... m. science), 8.329; the m. student, 9.66; of supposing Donne and Cowley m., 9.94; “m. verse,” 9.95; m. reading, 9.141; if a m. treatise, 11.7; that m. art, 11.64; too m. to have any pretension, 11.81; m. recitatives, 12.9; themes are ... m., 12.14; supposing Donne and Cowley m., 12.140; “m. verse” of Cowley, 12.140; m. originality, 13.145; a m. cast of thought, 15.222; m. reason, 16.21; too “m.,” 16.25; purely m., 16.111; may be considered m., 16.111.

METAPHYSICIAN:  means the m. may discover, 8.284; an Italian m., 14.61.

METAPHYSICIANISM:  anomalous m., 12.33; m. of Coleridge, 16.150.

METAPHYSICIANS:  told by the m., 12.37; As, by m., 15.13N.

METAPHYSICS:  the m. of Mr. Bentham, 8.85; derivation of the word m., 14.68; the word m., 14.69; cloudland of m., 14.209; ideas ... about m., 16.21; the perplexity of m., 16.25; the word, m., 16.25; condition of m., 16.111; science of m., 16.111.

METEMPSYCHOSES:  in the various m., 9.137.

METEMPSYCHOSIS:  with the conception of the m., 9.137; maintains the doctrines of the m., 14.56.

MORAL:  infinitely more m., 8.8; m. condition, 8.25; m. fortitude, 8.45; m. influence, 8.117; m. and physical existence, 8.125; conception of the m. and physical sublime, 8.127; m. and physical science, 8.212; m. capabilities, 8.253; m. ... absurdities, 9.17; m. and political science, 9.55; m. influence, 9.55; m. Beauty, 9.65; all-important m. law, 9.67; m. intelligence, 9.85; m. and political responsibility, 9.90; with our m. ... position, 9.90; m. truth, 9.95; of the very doubtful m., 9.137; m. standing of the tutor, 9.159; devoid of m. principle, 9.180; m. and Political Science, 9.193; m. courage, 9.261; qualities (m. or physical, or both), 9.261; a capability of m. action, 9.292; in the m. world, 9.292; m. being, 9.302; m. or physical universe, 9.304; of “ ... m. or physical universe ... ,” 9.304; vaguely term the m., 10.65; m. existence, 10.89; m. bias, 10.128; m. facts, 10.144; a m. and pecuniary view, 10.184; m. ... tendencies, 10.217; m. reflections, 11.23; didactic m., 11.68; inculcation of a m. ... essential, 11.69; m. sense, 11.70; m. sense, 11.70; m. sense, 11.71; deduction of a m., 11.77; a didactic m., 11.79; the m. thus conveyed, 11.79; default of the m. beneath, 11.79; the pointed m., 11.80; m. beauty, 11.80; “a false m. ... ,” 11.83; m. corruption, 11.97; m. put into ... mouth of ... dying minister, 11.111; m. ... conditions, 11.148; purport of the m. conveyed, 11.258; point to his [Horne’s] m., 11.259; (m. or physical), 11.278; suggestive of a m., 12.15; mental and m. combination, 12.34; m. taint, 12.42; characters overpower the m., 12.125; the m. they illustrate, 12.125; m. truth, 12.140; so-called m. courage, 12.239; m. of the story, 13.76; wisdom is m. rather than intellectual, 13.80; m. of very equivocal tendency, 13.112; what is absurdly termed, “a m.,” 13.112; in a m. point of view, 13.112; applauded for its [“George Barnwell”’s] “m.,” 13.113; its [“Elfrida”’s] m. of very equivocal tendency, 13.178; periodical m. Essay, 14.48; certain m. and physical truths, 14.92; m. power, 14.204; to seek a m., 14.208; poem ... inculcate a m., 14.271; by this m. is the poetical merit ... adjudged, 14.271; Pure Intellect, Taste, and the m. Sense, 14.272; m. Sense is separated, 14.272; m. Sense is regardful of Duty, 14.273; m. nature, 15.55; m. delinquency, 15.62; m. beauty, 15.117; m. nature, 15.122; the m. ... world, 15.123; m. and didactic writers, 15.226; character, literary or m., 15.228; m. force, 16.12; m. biography, 16.18; periodical m. essay, 16.37; beauty (m. or physical), 16.56; properties strictly m.), 16.67; m. nature of man, 16.68; shape of a m., 16.105; m. matter in motion, 16.123; m. combination, 16.150; m. philosophy, 16.158; m. philosophies, 16.158; “m. courage,” 16.162; courage ... not m., 16.162; simply “m.,” 16.162; “m. courage,” 16.162; loftiest m. nobility, 16.163.

MORALIST:  to the m., 11.7; excellent old English m., 11.15.

MORALIST’S:  m. parade of measures, 11.13.

MORALISTS:  metaphysicians and m. agree, 8.85; old English m., 14.172; Among the m., 16.35.

MORALITIES:  all m. in Erebus, 11.257; m. of manner, 13.200.

MORALITY:  high tone of m., 8.11; practical m., 8.172; m. of ... disclosures, 8.192; specimen of exquisite m., 8.199; dry and sarcastic m., 8.264; high spirit of ... m., 9.81; lofty m., 9.154; the m. of her tribe, 9.290; elevated m., 10.90; mock m., 11.93; words of grave m., 11.95; page of m., 11.247; Not the m. ... peculiarly exceptionable, 11.247; m. to be suggested, 11.247; “elaborate a m.,” 11.257; tone of thoughtful m., 15.109; Literary m., 16.153.

MORALIZE:  begins to m., 9.130; not forbidden to m., 11.71.

MORALLY:  the m. ... beautiful, 12.255; m. energetic, 13.140.

MORALS:  code of m., 9.64; m. unquestionable, 9.169; departments of ... m., 9.194; m. of art, 11.9; m. of the Muse, 11.114; these “minor m.,” 11.220; the minor m. of literature, 12.248; minor m. of composition, 13.118; minor m. of the muse, 13.138; in the “minor m.,” 13.140; Aristotle’s treatise on m., 14.68; m. of an author 14.174; so far as m. are concerned, 14.181; tripping in the minor m., 15.17; m. of literature, 15.227; Aristotle’s Treatise on m., 16.25; Minor m. of Literature, 16.32; minor m. of the Muse, 16.146.

MORAL SENTIMENT:  the Fairy ... not ... unaccompanied by any m., 8.301; m. of the brightness of the sky, 8.302; imagination ... exalted by the m. of beauty, 8.303; unaccompanied by any m., 10.65.

MORAL SENTIMENTS: Imaginative Faculties ... and m., 8.254; enveloped in the m., 8.301; enveloped in the m., 10.65.

MUSIC [IN POETRY]:  like unresolved discords in m., 9.272; poems with an eye to their adaptation for m., 10.41; strict reference to m., 10.41; pleasure derivable from m., 10.42; Give to m., 10.42; If any m. must imitate, 10.42; essentials true m., 10.43; verse ... most strictly married to m., 10.43; poetry not designed for m., 10.43; of an accompaniment in m., 10.65; sentiment may develop itself in ... m., 11.74; m. as one of the moods, 11.74; in m. ... the soul most nearly attains, 11.74; m. ... a moment in Poesy, 11.75; union of song with m., 11.75; A strain of m. enchants, 11.277; equality of sounds ... the principle of m., 14.219; scientific m., 14.219; scientific m., 14.219; the morale of m., 14.219; inferior or less capable m., 14.220; apparently incomprehensible m., 14.236; m. of the line, 14.239; perceive any rhythm or m. in the line, 14.253; appreciate their flow — their m., 14.254; certain sort of m., 14.254; the certain sort of m., 14.254; inviolable principle of all m., 14.258; the intended m., 14.260; m., the most entrancing of the Poetic moods, 14.274; through the poem, or through the m., 14.274; Poetic Sentiment ... especially in m., 14.274; m. ... is of so vast a moment in Poetry, 14.274; m. ... when inspired by the Poetic Sentiment, 14.274; union of Poetry with m., 14.275; Its [“A Mother’s Prayer in Illness”] m., 15.102; regularity enough, but no great deal of m., 16.5; element of the true m., 16.29; imitation in m., 16.29; m. must imitate, 16.29; strain of m., 16.55; stanza ... full of m., 16.59; m. in its most extended sense, 16.84; the mathematics ... of m., 16.112; adaptation for m., 16.136; strict reference to m., 16.136; sentimental pleasure derivable from m., 16.137; Give ... m. ... undue decision, 16.137; m. must imitate, 16.138; essentials of true m., 16.138; verse ... married to m., 16.138; “m. of the spheres,” 16.163; “m.” as “the best education for the soul,” 16.163; “m. of the spheres,” 16.163; m. in our understanding of the term, 16.163.

MUSICAL [IN POETRY]:  stanzas of a common, but m. versification, 9.285; spirited, imaginative and m. commencement, 9.288; absolute imitation in m. sounds, 10.42; a m. ear, 10.71; of the deeper m. impressions, 11.75; ancient m. expressions, 11.281; m. effect, 12.88; “The Unseen River” is m., 12.173; ( ... not merely the m. effect), 12.262; cultivated m. taste, 14.219; line will seem m., 14.236; the line ... m., 14.237; the line is m., 14.237; declare it m., 14.238; lines ... sweet and m., 14.242; m. in spite of all law, 14.243; ancient verse ... in general m., 14.253; ancient verse ... occasionally very m., 14.253; m. and fanciful passages, 15.93; she [Mrs. Hewitt] is led by a m. ear, 15.125; a m. ear, 16.27; true m. expression, 16.29; m. expressions, 16.59; imitation in m. sounds, 16.137.

MUSICALLY [IN POETRY]:  a passage ... most tersely and m. ... expressed, 12.31.

MYSTIC:  a m. ... meaning, 10.35; atmosphere of the m., 10.42; involved in the consideration of the m., 10.65; term m. ... in the sense of Augustus William Schlegel, 10.65; moral of any sentiment is its m. ... expression, 10.65; strongly m., 10.66; he [Hawthorne] has done well as a mystic, 13.155; atmosphere of the m., 16.29; atmosphere of the m., 16.137.

MYSTICAL:  sense of the ... m., 8.282; the sublime and the m., 8.282N; of the m., 8.301; of the m., 10.65; as m. as Kant, 11.235; m. something or nothing, 12.4; m. strain, 12.8.

MYSTICISM:  m. of the writer, 9.52; dignity and m., 10.131; of its m., 11.111; tone of ... m., 11.113; vortex of m., 11.253; m. of his [Hawthorne’s], 13.154; m. of the transcendentalists, 15.61; m. and cant, 15.191.

MYSTICISM’S:  for m. sake, 15.260.

MYSTICS:  with whom we have no patience ... the m., 15.260.


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NATURE: [IN RESPECT TO ART AND AUTHORITY]:  false to n., 8.71; fidelity to n., 8.73; true to n., 8.97; looked upon n. with a speculative attention, 8.124; in the vivid truth to n., 8.261; turn our eyes from n., 8.281; crowded with n., 9.102; true to n., 9.103; All deviations ... from n., 9.138; calm majesty of n., 9.162; eternal cycles of physical n., 9.269; to endow inanimate n., 9.292; not in the imitation of n., 10.28; subservient to n., 10.93; n. ... a bond-maiden to ... most unsatisfactory art, 10.121; Art of Mr. Dickens ... a happy modification of m., 10.150; to copy with accuracy, 10.152; The analogies of n. are universal, 10.222; immoveably in n., 11.2; ( ... until n. herself expires), 11.5; a firm basis in n., 11.24; acute observation of n., 11.61; [Old Willet] is n. itself, 11.62; imitation of n., 11.88; faith in n. and her laws, 11.99; unfounded in n., 11.105; general intention of n., 11.279; or n. lies, 12.39; gorgeous unaltered handiwork of n., 12.64; a n. that can never grow old, 12.119; The “Great worshipper” is n., 12.150; ideas of chance, n., art, etc., 12.163; the mother of n., 12.163; the offspring of n., 12.163; reads ... with the emphasis of n., 12.188; teachings ... of n. herself, 12.192; n. which combines ... truthfulness with ... jeu d’esprit, 12.210; redeeming traits of n. and truth, 12.211; in n. we meet with no such combination of incident, 13.46; (either of n. or civilization), 13.75; happiest development of n., 13.86; true to n., 13.111; portraiture of n. in human action and earthly incident, 13.112; surpass n. herself, 13.112; fidelity with which it [drama] should depict n., 13.113; breathing of n., 13.115; at war with all the analogies of n., 13.129; warm appreciation of the beauty of n., 13.130; cycles of physical n., 13.133; [ ... to endow inanimate n. ...]*, 13.137; least concern with n., 13.147; true to n., 13.178; breathing of n., 13.181; images of n., 14.183; instead of n., 14.217; laws of n., 14.256; not of n. but ... tourism, 15.119; taste, n. and reason the antipodes, 15.249; general intention of n., 16.57; no n. so immediately presented, 16.120; “ ... what the Senses perceive in n. ... ,” 16.164; what is in n., 16.164.

NATURE’S [IN RESPECT TO ART AND AUTHORITY]:  turn our eyes ... even to n. God, 8.281; n. own tear, 12.191; n. general intention, 13.112; no absolute controversion of n. general intention, 13.113; a path not so much his [Macaulay’s] as n., 13.196; n. own tear, 15.31; one of “n. own noblemen,” 15.48.

NOVEL:  Mr. Kennedy’s new n., 8.4; varied events of the n., 8.7; principal character in the n., 8.7; right usage of n. writing, 8.7; main interest of a n., 8.7; art of n. writing, 8.52; the hero of the n., 8.55; Mr. Fay’s n., 8.59; the n. of Norman Leslie, 8.61; his [Dr. Bird’s] last n., 8.63; this n. [‘The Hawks of Hawk Hollow’] reached us some years ago, 8.63; read the n. from beginning to end, 8.64; a n. ... by the author of ... Calavar, 8.65; the opening of the n., 8.71; Dr. Bird’s n., 8.71; style of the n., 8.72; find in the n., 8.72; a character in a n., 8.97; dislike the n., 8.110; as a n., 8.110; one n. of a series, 8.145; historical n., 8.146; the hero of the n., 8.147; every fashionable n. since the flood, 8.148; leading incident, of the n., 8.149; writing a n., 8.158; that very fine n. [“The Linwoods”], 8.162; every n. and volume of poetry, 8.185; most perfect specimen of a n. extant, 8.186; a fashionable n., 8.187; the business of his [Mr. Mattson’s] n., 8.189; Mr. Mattson’s n., 8.193; hero of ... n., 8.196; writing a n., 8.200; The n. is written, 8.200; discoursing of the n., 8.202; ( ... the common acceptation of “the n.”), 8.223; the best n. of Bulwer, 8.223; characters who figure in the n., 8.225; under the title of a n., 8.226; readers ... not yet seen the n. [Rienzi], 8.228; the master n. of Scott, 8.234; published ... a n., 8.279N; of the usual n. size, 9.24; fashionable n., 9.46; n. certainly requires, 9.46; common n., 9.46; historical n., 9.106; in the n. of Professor Ingraham, 9.112; n. is written by Mr. James S. French, 9.116; Mr. French’s n., 9.118; plan of the n., 9.122; n. is an original, 9.126; neglected in the n., 9.137; of the species of n., 9.138; species of n., 9.153; scene of this n., action of the n., 9.245; the best American n., 9.264; n. bears a strong family resemblance, 9.265; n. now published, 10.50; the hero of the n., 10.115; every second n., 10.116; most striking portions of the n., 10.118; Mr. Bulwer in his last n., 10.120; scene in the whole n., 10.121; unity of the n., 10.122; figured in every n., 10.125; out of a n., 10.130; best n., 10.132; the whole n., 10.212; perusal of the n., 10.214; no n. was less interesting, 10.217; a n. ... less than nothing, 10.220; nor an art n., 11.6; commencement of the n., 11.14; thesis of the n., 11.49; fashion of periodical n.-writing, 11.54; true catastrophe of the n., 11.59; n. does not admit, 11.102; ordinary n., 11.107; end unattainable by the n., 11.108; n. heroes, 11.212; received this n., 12.207; well known n., 12.219; ordinary n. size, 13.94; ordinary n. is objectionable, 13.152; n. cannot be read at one sitting, 13.153; idea of the tale ... in the n., altogether unattainable, 13.153; n. was written backwards, 14.189; Having chosen a n., 14.194; the ordinary n. form, 15.45; a n. of somewhat greater elaborateness, 15.108; “Hope Leslie” ... also a n., 15.108; the ordinary “n.” form, 15.112; treated ... subject more effectively in his [W. Gilmore Simms’] n., 15.119; a n. called “Elkswatawa,” 15.219; a n. called “Maurice Werterbern,” 15.234; a well-written n., 15.241; “The Forsaken,” a n., 15.255; like a n.-hero dilemma’d, 16.4; ordinary n. volumes, 16.77; gilded pill of the ... n., 16.79; a better n. of its kind, 16.142; more imperatively demanded than in the n., 16.171.

NOVELIST:  the n. ... fortunate in the choice of an epoch, 8.6; what no n. ... hitherto performed, 8.147; the n. has interwoven ... fictitious incidents, 8.147; adoption by our n. [Simms], 8.156; the n. ... himself [Morris Mattson], 8.185; slang dialect made use of by either n. [Mattson, Bulwer], 8.196; Viewing him [Bulwer] as a n., 8.223; the n. had ... meditated, 8.224; by the n. in language, 9.108; n. is too ... descriptive, 9.114; n. is unequal, 9.125; As a n., Mr. James, 9.168; imitator of the Scotch n., 9.169; the great n., 9.172; anecdote ... of the n., 9.203; no American n., 9.260; for the purpose of the n., 9.261; ordinary n., 10.38; n. dwells too unequivocally, 10.54; style of our n., 10.54; n. had proceeded, 10.117; design of the n., 10.120; n. has failed, 10.124; n. seems to make it a point of conscience, 10.129; success as a n., 10.132; periodical n., 10.150; successful n., 10.201; fancying the n. in some perplexing dream, 10.215; interest ... due, not to the n., 10.216; “truly native n., Mr. Cooper,” 11.2; as a n., 11.16; purpose of the n., 11.49; insisted upon by the n., 11.56; fame of the n., 11.63; n. has ... written, 11.207; property of every n., 11.209; immortalized by our n., 11.214; “the best n.,” 12.248; Mr. Cooper, the n., 14.46; reputation as a n. [Mr. Paulding], 15.51; the west ... untrodden by ... the n., 15.84; Nothing was left to the n., 15.119; [Mr. Simms] As ... poet ... better than as a n., 15.193; F. W. Thomas ... distinguished ... as a n., 15.209; more successful as ... essayist ... than as a n., 15.220; An ordinary n., 16.50; classes of composition ... n., 16.156; As a n., 16.157.

NOVELIST’S:  n. inanity, 10.216.

NOVELISTS:  American n., 8.4; the best of our native n., 8.95; some Parisian n., 8.156; representative of those n., 9.168; best of the English n., 9.169; qualities in American n., 9.247; n. of Great Britain, 9.265; our n. are great Knowns, 10.190; one or two hundred ordinary n., 14.38; popular n., 15.188; all our n., 16.41.

NOVELS:  master n. of the day, 8.95; one of the Pelham n., 8.151; imitations ... from the other two n. [Gil Blas and Anne of Geierstein], 8.196; ponderous and beloved n., 8.222; Art n., 8.231; Art n., 8.232; composition of their n., 9.116; historical n., 9.168; in the n. of the day, 9.255; one of his [Bulwer’s] previous n., 10.124; A mode ... in ... his [Smollett’s] n., 10.168; The n. of Marryat, 10.200; n. ... read with a hurry, 10.201; periodical n., 10.210; In both n. [“Caleb Williams” and “Jack Shepherd”] the hero escapes ... from prison, 10.218; n. depending for effect, 11.10; one of the Smollett or Fielding n., 11.14; similar to the n., 11.205; n. of Cooper, 11.209; most passionate and romantic of n., 12.192; n. of Scott, of Bulwer, or of D’Israeli, 12.224; anonymous n., 13.94; James’s multitudinous n., 14.171; one or two brief n. in pamphlet form, 15.30; one of the best n. [“The Confessions of a Poet”] of its kind, 15.47; one of the best n. [“George Balcombe”] ... published in America, 15.195; one of the best of American n. [“Calavar”], 15.204; the “fashionable” n., 16.35; the “fashionable” n., 16.36; his [John Neal’s] earlier n., 16.131; list of foreign n., 16.157.


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ORIGINAL:  If ever volumes were ... called o., 8.4; entitled to the character of “an o.,” 8.8; unfortunately not o., 8.59; a character ... we may ... consider o., 8.71; an o. one [mountebank], 8.71; o. conception, 8.96; Kisel ... is o., 8.97; thirty-nine are o., 8.138; the o. poems, 8.140; whether it [a book] be o., 8.159; o. publications, 8.139; the first o. work [of Mr. Lieber], 8.164; not one o. incident or idea, 8.184; “How o. is Mr. Mattson!” 8.190; nervous, brilliant, and o., 8.217; Captain Trelawney is as o., 8.223; the character described ... is neither very o., 8.261; o. generic delineations, 8.261; accredited to him as o., 8.304N; especially delicate and o., 9.3; upon the o. idea, 9.10; o. in American Belles Lettres, 9.126; o. beauty, 9.151; contrived to be ... o., 9.159; the most ... o. portion of the Essay, 9.165; the most o., 9.171; the most o., 9.259; in any degree o., 9.260; not o., 9.261; o. characters, 9.261; o. conception, 9.302; idea ... not o., 9.304; done an o. thing, 10.57; o. conception of the ballad, 10.89; groundwork ... of no very o. character, 10.116; o. characters, 10.125; ideas ... would have been o., 10.141; o. in conception, 10.148; ( ... o. combinations of character), 10.153; abounding in o. views, 10.156; not quite o., 10.166; (although by no means o.), 11.30; o. about matters of versification, 11.35; so o. a stylist, 11.60; as o. caricatures, 11.61; Sir John Chester is ... not o., 11.62; brief o. pieces, 11.66; from the o. poems, 11.67; of the o. pieces, 11.67; o. poems, 11.79; o. conception, 11.80; anecdotes ... not one truly o., 11.92; genius be o., 11.96; The inventive or o. mind, 11.110; o. at all points, 11.110; vividly o., 11.111; nothing very o., 11.162; passage ... not altogether o., 11.169; o. way of conglomerating consonants, 11.173; nothing o. in this story, 11.209; o. literary contents, 11.222; o. thought, 11.237; book ... “as o.,” 11.238; Mr. Griswold’s o. portion, 11.238; o. with Mr. Lowell, 11.244; o. conception, 11.259; combine the o., 11.278; neither very o. in subject, 12.14; profoundly o., 12.33; But whether obscure, o., 12.33; faults of the great o., 12.33; o. quack, 12.36; o. point, 12.57; o. versification, 12.70; ( ... none are individually o.), 12.70; not claimed ... o., 12.88; o. ... man of genius, 12.108; more o. kind than ... Iambic Pentameter, 12.109; scarcely look for anything very o., 12.110; o. point of the play, 12.121; thesis is not an o. one, 12.124; o. writer, 12.130; entitled to be called o., 12.167; full of o. force, 12.170; not altogether o., 12.178; conception is o., 12.228; one of the most o. fictions, 12.248; idea is not only o., 12.262; an o. poem, 13.12; metre is o., 13.22; seldom indeed an o. development, 13.54; to produce a fully o. effect, 13.59; Is he [Longfellow] o., 13.59; Is he [Longfellow] o., 13.59; Whether ... author is o., 13.60; may he [Longfellow] not be o., 13.70; an o, book, 13.73; o. in conception, 13.73; an o. ... book, 13.77; most o. of American poems, 13.79; to be peculiar is to be o., 13.143; very o. writers, 13.143; such persons are too o., 13.143; mind which most keenly feels the o., 13.143; if Mr. Hawthorne were really o., 13.144; he [Hawthorne] is not o., 13.144; as o., 13.144; considers o., 13.144; an o. writer, 13.144; justified in thinking him [Hawthorne] o., 13.145; first design of calling him [Hawthorne] “o.,” 13.145; to be o. is to be popular, 13.145; regard as o. in letters, 13.145; absolutely o. with the writer, 13.146; the true o., 13.146; “how o. this is,” 13.146; strong ... affinity to the true o., 13.147; He [Hawthorne] is peculiar and not o., 13.154; o. imagery, 13.157; never very o., 13.170; weak and o., 13.196; sake of being erroneously o., 13.196; if the idea be o., 13.210; article is not o., 14.40; unquestionably o., 14.147; o. in itself, 14.147; o. contributions, 14.160; no man ... has ever done ... an o. thing, 14.203; an o. character, 15.21; wit ... in any respect o., 15.28; thought ... not o., 15.28; palming off their spirit as o., 15.35; whether ... o., 15.36; incidents ... striking and o., 15.46; the finale ... o., 15.64; not always vividly o., 15.90; rather broad than o., 15.93; rarely entitled to be called o., 15.206; o. poems, 15.222; saw it [“Florence Vane”] ... as o., 15.234; forcible or o., 15.241; o. genius, 15.254; o. composition, 16.9; an o. one, 16.16; An o. idea, 16.28; somewhat the less o., 16.39; o. in ... entire theme, 16.43; thoroughly o., 16.43; more trouble than an o. thing, 16.46; combine the o. with that which is natural, 16.57; to be o., 16.68; o. ... metaphor, 16.87; done an o. thing, 16.90; remarkably o., 16.97; an o. writer, 16.103; incidents are striking and o., 16.142; profoundly o., 16.149.

ORIGINALITIES:  the happiest o., 13.145.

ORIGINALITY:  o. of manner, 8.73; o: of manner, 8.73; the remotest claim to o., 8.77; aims at o., 8.109; appearance, and ... value, of o., 8.136; the o. ... of Edward Lytton Bulwer, 8.223; o. of expression, 9.1; o. of thought, 9.71; latter species of o., 9.262; little o. of thought, 9.279; pretension to o., 10.12N; absence of o., 10.53; o. . one of the distinguishing traits, 10.57; latter class of o., 10.126; embodies more o., 10.152; remarkable o., 10.152; shrine of o., 10.183; indication of o., 10.198; o. of fancy, 11.9; Its [“Culprit Fay”’s] o. is none at all, 11.17; Mr. Mathews’ claim to o., 11.35; clearly deduce the novelty, the o., 11.73; His [Hawthorne’s] o. both of incident and of reflection, 11.103; high o. of thought, 11.105; o. of manner and expression, 11.105; o. ... has an uneasy and meretricious quaintness, 11.105; more of o., 11.105; absence ... of o., 11.106; abound in ... o., 11.110; Hawthorne’s distinctive trait is ... o., 11.110; nature of o., 11.110; whose genius and o., 11.237; (Is not this o.? ... ), 11.237; fresh o., 11.250; in o., 11.271; nothing of o., 11.277; o. of theme, 11.277; so far as o. is concerned, 11.277; Dismissing o. and tone, 11.278; absolute o., 12.106; great deal ... of o., 12.110; score of o., 12.116; o. of plan, 12.125; shadow of o., 12.125; point at which o. ceases to be a virtue, 12.130; o. of manner, 12.216; in o. of its conception, 12.231; semblance of o., 12.237; more of o. in conception, 12.256; story has a marked o., 12.260; o. of Mr. Longfellow, 13.11; o. of poetic invention, 13.18; some o. in his [Tomaso’s] conception, 13.51; autorial o., 13.59; o. of the general thesis, 13.59; o. ... one of the rarest of merits, 13.59; lower branches of o., 13.59; claim to o., 13.60; claim o. of subject, 13.60; meed of o. for the peculiar manner, 13.70; excelling in this most important point (o.), 13.79; o. ... a principal object, 13.85; every class of fiction is the better for o., 13.85; lofty merit of o., 13.86; a proper o., 13.86; o. of “The Sinless Child,” 13.86; true o., 13.143; true or commendable o., 13.143; the element of the literary o., 13.144; writer’s claim to o., 13.144; even novelty ... would cease, to produce the legitimate o., 13.144; if we judge this o., 13.144; to preserve his o., 13.144; commended this poem [“Lalla Rookh”] for o., 13.145; the effect, o., 13.145; an understanding of o., 13.145; metaphysical o., 13.145; o. ... tasks and startles the intellect, 13.145; true o., 13.146; want of general o., 13.154; no o. on the face of the earth, 13.171; o. of poetic invention, 13.191; pretensions to o., 14.40; true o., 14.73; o. always in view, 14.194; first object (as usual) was o., 14.203; o. ... by no means a matter ... of impulse or intuition, 14.203; no o. in either the rhythm or metre, 14.203; o. the “Raven” has, 14.204; effect of ... o. of combination, 14.204; which gives him [N. P. Willis] the o., 15.13; air of o., 15.19; merit of o., 15.20; the air of o., 15.28; not a particle of o., 15.29; winning credit ... for o., 15.35; lauded as o., 15.35; reputation for o., 15.36; o. in this essay, 15.43; inconsistent o., 15.59; absolute o., 15.63; o. of effect, 15.69; o. in ... structure, 15.102; the distinction of o., 15.110; suggestive o. of Miss Fuller, 15.113; Freedom, dignity, precision, and grace without o., 15.187; not destitute of o., 15.197; seldom evince high o., 15.207; to furnish ... friends with ... o., 15.209N; o. of thought, 15.211; force, boldness, and o., 15.220; claim to o., 15.236; forte ... o., 16.21; nothing of o., 16.55; o. of theme, 16.55; so far as o. is concerned, 16.56; o. and tone, 16.57; rant and cant against o., 16.67; invectives against o., 16.68; distaste for o., 16.68; element of ... o., 16.85; element ... of o., 16.86; certain air of o., 16.98; an air of o., 16.103; o. ceases to be a matter of commendation, 16.103; marked o., 16.178.

ORIGINALLY:  can think o., 9.92; talk ... o., 16.2.


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Notes:

None.


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[S:1 - PCV, 1966] - Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore - Works - An Index of Poe's Critical Vocabulary (Dameron and Stagg) (Index to Criticism, I-O)